All posts by gamesavepoint

Xbox One Adds New Backwards Compatible Game Today

New additions to the Xbox One backwards-compatible game catalog have been slow to start the new year, but we’ve just gotten a good one. Microsoft has announced that Xbox 360 game Ace Combat 6: Fires of Liberation is now playable on Xbox One, just days before the release of its sequel.

As is typical with backwards compatible games, you can simply pop in the disc to initiate a download and begin playing on Xbox One. The game is unfortunately not currently available for purchase digitally from the Xbox Store. That said, if you have any interest in the upcoming Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown, you’re in luck; by pre-ordering, you’ll receive a free copy of Ace Combat 6. Ace Combat 7, which you can see in the video above, releases on January 18 for both Xbox One and PS4.

Ace Combat 6 was originally released back in 2007 as an Xbox 360 exclusive. Although it didn’t offer much in the way of innovation for the series outside of online multiplayer, it was well received in our review, which scored it an 8.5/10.

“Ace Combat 6 makes up for it by providing the most immersive experience yet in an arcade flight combat game, thanks to smooth, gorgeous visuals and polished gameplay,” Kevin VanOrd wrote. “And you’ll want to play again and again: There are medals to earn, aircraft and special weapons to purchase with the points you receive during missions, and a good selection of Xbox Live achievement points to earn that are spread out evenly among the campaign and multiplayer modes. You can also save replays of your matches, and the cinematic camera views make them a pleasure to watch. Whether you’re an Ace Combat veteran or a series newcomer, you won’t be disappointed.”

Other recent additions to the Xbox One backwards compatibility list include Battlestations Pacific, Fuel, and Rayman Raving Rabbids. The number of playable titles (which also includes a limited selection of those for the original Xbox) has grown to a staggering size. For some help in finding what’s worth playing, check out our recently updated rundown on Xbox One’s best backwards compatible games.

Source: GameSpot.com

New Xbox One Backwards Compatible Game Out Now

New additions to the Xbox One backwards-compatible game catalog have been slow to start the new year, but we’ve just gotten a good one. Microsoft has announced that Xbox 360 game Ace Combat 6: Fires of Liberation is now playable on Xbox One, just days before the release of its sequel.

As is typical with backwards compatible games, you can simply pop in the disc to initiate a download and begin playing on Xbox One. The game is unfortunately not currently available for purchase digitally from the Xbox Store. That said, if you have any interest in the upcoming Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown, you’re in luck; by pre-ordering, you’ll receive a free copy of Ace Combat 6. Ace Combat 7, which you can see in the video above, releases on January 18 for both Xbox One and PS4.

Ace Combat 6 was originally released back in 2007 as an Xbox 360 exclusive. Although it didn’t offer much in the way of innovation for the series outside of online multiplayer, it was well received in our review, which scored it an 8.5/10.

“Ace Combat 6 makes up for it by providing the most immersive experience yet in an arcade flight combat game, thanks to smooth, gorgeous visuals and polished gameplay,” Kevin VanOrd wrote. “And you’ll want to play again and again: There are medals to earn, aircraft and special weapons to purchase with the points you receive during missions, and a good selection of Xbox Live achievement points to earn that are spread out evenly among the campaign and multiplayer modes. You can also save replays of your matches, and the cinematic camera views make them a pleasure to watch. Whether you’re an Ace Combat veteran or a series newcomer, you won’t be disappointed.”

Other recent additions to the Xbox One backwards compatibility list include Battlestations Pacific, Fuel, and Rayman Raving Rabbids. The number of playable titles (which also includes a limited selection of those for the original Xbox) has grown to a staggering size. For some help in finding what’s worth playing, check out our recently updated rundown on Xbox One’s best backwards compatible games.

Source: GameSpot.com

Dragon Ball Z Action RPG In Development

Bandai Namco has some big Dragon Ball-related announcements in store for this month. In addition to teasing a new DLC character for Dragon Ball FighterZ, the publisher revealed that a brand-new Dragon Ball game is in development.

No further details about the new title have been announced yet, but Bandai Namco says it will be an action RPG “focusing on the world of Dragon Ball Z.” In the same tweet, the publisher hinted that Dragon Ball FighterZ will add “the Warrior from Universe 11” to its roster, presumably referring to Jiren from the Tournament of Power arc in Dragon Ball Super.

Bandai Namco indicated it will reveal more information during the Dragon Ball FighterZ World Tour Finals, which take place later this month, on January 26-27. “We said that new information on FighterZ would be coming during the Finals, but we’re also planning to release other big news,” Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 producer Masayuki Hirano said during the recent Dragon Ball Games Super Showcase stream. While it seems Hirano is teasing more information about the new in-development RPG, it could also be that Bandai Namco’s “other big news” pertains to the existing Dragon Ball Z titles.

During the same stream, Dragon Ball FighterZ producer Tomoko Hiroki hinted that a second season of DLC is on the way for the game. The first season pass included eight additional fighters, with the most recent–Android 17–arriving back in September.

In other Dragon Ball news, Bandai Namco recently announced that Super Dragon Ball Heroes: World Mission will receive a western release. The game is scheduled to launch for PC and Nintendo Switch on April 5.

Source: GameSpot.com

Final Fantasy XIV’s New Blue Mage Class Is Limited But Fun

Final Fantasy XIV added Blue Mages to the game this week, allowing players to dress in their finest costumes and learn magical attacks from monsters. The “limited” job can’t do as many activities as others, but their addition creates fun opportunities for groups and solo players alike.

Blue Mages were announced during the Final Fantasy XIV Fan Festival in November to a mixture of excitement and confusion. Fans were excited about the unique class but unsure what FFXIV’s first “limited” job would mean. The answer is a bit disappointing: Blue Mages can only level up to level 50 and can’t queue up for events like dungeon roulettes, raids, or PvP activities. But the core experience of leveling up your character and finding new skills is fun if brief and brings a lot of color to the game world.
I was excited as I waited for the Blue Mage class quest to arrive in-game late Monday night. The city plaza was full of so many players that moving a few step meant waiting some seconds before data loaded and you could see more people. The crowd was dressed in blue, bards played the song “Blue (Da Ba Dee)” by Eiffel 65, and folks tried to summon the NPCs by waving blue glo-sticks. To pass time, I helped judge a costume contest for a group of players excited for a change of pace and new magical skills to try.

Unfortunately, the quest giver didn’t spawn until much later Tuesday morning. When I woke up, I started the quest, wherein a supposed swindler is selling access to blue magic. Turns out he’s legit, even if his presentation method is a bit questionable. I was quickly able to access the class, donned a dashing outfit, and began to explore the game world for monsters. Blue Mages learn skills by seeing monsters perform them. To get a new skill, you need to fight a monster, see them use a skill, and then defeat them, which opens up a small chance that you’ll learn the ability. Combine this with the fact that Blue Mages earn a lot more experience off monsters than other classes—presumably because they can’t queue for random dungeons—and my server was full to the brim with Blue Mages. It was fun, encouraging people to get out of cities and private instances. Players in high level zones would call out the coordinates of rare monsters, while other areas were nearly overflowing with Blue Mages trying to get skills. It didn’t always work out—trolls started to head to these areas and kill the monsters before Blue Mages could learn their abilities—but if the goal of Blue Mages was to get people out and about, it definitely succeeded.

Part of the fun of Blue Mages comes from trying to know where to find an ability. I’m newer to the game than most of the people I know, so I teamed up with them to speed up the process. Playing in a group of only Blue Mages is a strange thing, but I had a lot of fun. It’s a mix between a normal experience-grinding party and something more deliberate. You run around and beat up monsters, but you ping-pong from area to area, stopping to let Bombs self-destruct in your face or watch a Cactuar fire 1,000 needles. In some cases, we entered dungeons together. Some Blue Mage abilities can only be obtain in dungeons, which means making a premade group and delving deep into risky instances. Because your repertoire is limited to what you’ve seen (and you’re not barred from going into higher level areas), you might not have traditional tanks and healers. But you can still, as I did, have one Blue Mage casting healing spells while the rest fire off 1,000 Needles spells for huge spikes of damage. It’s a more haphazard experience than normal dungeon crawling, but the silliness is fun.

It doesn’t take long to level up a Blue Mage; I power leveled from about level 19 to 50 in a handful of hours. A player who was already level 50 showed me an area where I could pull high level monsters and have my tank friend kill them off to gain tons of experience. As a result I was able to go from level 24 to 50 in about two hours. It helped, too, that I had gear provided by a kind crafting friend of mine.

That frees me up to focus on hunting monsters and learning abilities, but some players might be disappointed that they are able to blaze through the leveling process, especially since the max power level is lower than other classes. Blue Mage abilities, while fun, are less powerful than traditional classes. As a result, I expect to see the amount of Blue Mages in the field reduce dramatically in the new few days.

To make up for their limited utility, Blue Mages have access to special solo content called the Masked Carnivale. This is a collection of combat challenges that players can tackle for rewards like cash and special currencies for redeeming gear. Blue Mages are able to survey a scenario’s details beforehand—what enemies there are, what their elemental weaknesses are—and then try to defeat the challenge using the spells they know. The idea is to make the perfect spell loadout for each encounter and try to defeat the encounter quickly.

The Masked Carnivale has nice brain-teasers, and I even spotted players comparing strategies in chat. However, once you figure out what to do, the encounters could quickly become side-content you farm sometimes for some quick cash and nothing else. If the Carnivale expands and adds encounters at a good pace, or even offers new, special challenges from time to time, I can see players testing their skills and even competing for the best completion times.

Blue Mage isn’t going to impress players who wanted something more robust, and its limited nature seems destined to produce a fad more than a long-standing class. However, the immediate effect of Blue Mages on Final Fantasy XIV has been pretty magical. Watching my server eagerly await the class and then explode (sometimes literally, thanks to the self-destruct monster ability) into a frenzy of activity has been incredibly exciting.

Blue Mages show that limited classed can work in Final Fantasy XIV, offering new kinds of gameplay experiences. Players eager for a change of pace should check it out and embrace the chaos while they can. The process might be fleeting, but it’s tons of fun while it lasts.

Source: Kotaku.com

Check Out This Massive Spider-Man Game Collectible Of Rhino

By now, if you have been playing Spider-Man, you’ve probably beaten it, gotten through all the DLC, and spent plenty of time as the friendly neighborhood web-slinger taking selfies in front of famous New York City landmarks. But now, you can celebrate your love of the critically acclaimed game by picking up a couple of cool dioramas from Diamond Select Toys, including the Spider-Man villain, Rhino.

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The Rhino diorama, which you can see above, stands at 10 inches tall, and his appearance is based on the look from the Spider-Man PS4 game. It will be packaged in a full-color window box and will cost $70. It will be available for pre-order on January 25.

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Additionally, there is a Spider-Man diorama available for pre-order now. The $45 collectible comes in at 10 inches and is wearing his costume from the game, which you can see above. He stands on the Spider-Man logo, ready to thwip someone.

If you’re interested in either of these figures, make sure to check out Diamond Select Toys, but Rhino won’t be available for pre-order for a couple weeks.

We named Spider-Man one of the 10 best games of 2018, and GameSpot gave Marvel’s Spider-Man a 9, and Edmond Tran said in his review, “Minor shortcomings don’t detract from Insomniac’s achievement in creating a game that feels like an authentic interpretation of a beloved creation. The feeling of embodying Spidey and using his abilities is astonishing, and the time spent on exploring its major characters help make its story feel heartfelt, despite superhero bombast. There have been open-world Spider-Man games before, but none so riveting and full of personality, none that explore and do justice to this many facets of the universe.”

Source: GameSpot.com

Yesterday, Riot Games updated its company manifesto

Yesterday, Riot Games updated its company manifesto, which, according to Kotaku’s report, was a contributing factor to its sexist culture. Released in 2012, Riot’s values “served us well for many years, but didn’t evolve along with us,” the website reads. The new manifesto has removed points like “Take Play Seriously” and “Challenge Convention” and added “Dare To Dream” and “Thrive Together.”

Source: Kotaku.com

EA’s Troubled Decade Of Star Wars Games

On May 6, 2013, Disney and Electronic Arts announced that the two companies had signed a ten-year deal to make Star Wars games. It was an industry-changing deal that, in retrospect, looks like a big mistake for both parties.

The deal, which was largely put together by EA Labels president Frank Gibeau, came just four weeks after the collapse of the storied developer LucasArts. Gibeau, CEO John Riccitiello, and their executive team had discussed all sorts of variations on this deal, as I reported in my first book. Would they buy LucasArts outright? Continue development on the much-hyped action-adventure Star Wars 1313 and the near-finished shooter Star Wars: First Assault? Ultimately, they decided to buy the exclusive license to Star Wars, ensuring that EA and only EA could make console games based on the most popular franchise in the galaxy. (Mobile and social games would continue to be a free-for-all.)

Back in 2013, Star Wars was in a rough place. The most recent movie had been 2005’s Revenge of the Sith, while the newest video game had been 2012’s Kinect Star Wars. Both got plenty of attention, but little of it was good. So when Disney bought Lucasfilm in April 2013 and then gave EA the keys to the Millenium Falcon in May, fans hoped this might lead to a Star Wars video game resurgence.

Nearly six years later, that resurgence has not happened. While Disney’s new Star Wars movies (and cartoons) are generally great, the video game landscape remains grim. Gibeau is no longer at EA, having left for Zynga in early 2016, and the publisher has only been able to release two console games since 2013: the well-received but multiplayer-only Star Wars Battlefront and its catastrophic sequel, Star Wars Battlefront II, which epitomized the worst habits of modern gaming with its to pay-to-win mechanics, discovered as the game was in beta. Those mechanics proved so controversial that EA stripped them from the game before it even came out.

What became of EA’s other ambitious Star Wars plans? In October 2017, the publisher shut down Visceral Games, the studio behind Dead Space, and cancelled its turbulent project Ragtag. The legendary role-playing game developer BioWare has tried to get a Knights of the Old Republic sequel off the ground for years but has never quite succeeded. And this month, as I broke last night, EA canceled yet another Star Wars project code-named Orca, which had been in development at its Vancouver studio since Visceral’s closure.

There are projects still in the pipeline, including Jedi Fallen Order, an action-adventure game from the makers of Titanfall that’s currently scheduled for a fall 2019 release. EA Vancouver is now making a smaller-scale Star Wars game in hopes of releasing it around late 2020 (to coincide with next-gen consoles), and, according to people connected to the company, EA’s Motive studio in Montreal is also leading its own smaller-scale Star Wars project that has not yet been announced. There’s also the long-running massively multiplayer game Star Wars: The Old Republic, which still receives updates, as well as a few mobile games, like the popular Star Wars: Galaxy of Heroes.

But it’s safe to say that fans were hoping for more than this. In six years of EA’s stewardship over Star Wars, we’ve seen two significant console games, both of them Battlefronts. This is the most popular franchise on the planet, one that’s full of lore, depth, and rich characters to explore. How did EA screw up so badly?

There are many answers to that question, including “Star Wars games are tough to make” and “Big publishers are full of bureaucracy.” It’s impossible to point to a single factor for Star Wars’ recent video game drought. Here’s an interesting tidbit I keep hearing, though: The scuttlebutt among those who work or have worked at EA is that CEO Andrew Wilson was never entirely thrilled with the Star Wars deal. It was made by his predecessors, after all. When I asked, an EA spokesperson denied that Wilson was unhappy with the deal, calling it “pure speculation and not accurate.” Proving how someone feels will always be impossible, but this is something I’ve heard from a number of people in various positions at EA, including high ones.

Wilson, who took over in September 2013, has always been public about the value of EA making its own intellectual property. Aside from the publisher’s lucrative sports division, which brings in roughly a kajillion dollars a year thanks to FIFA, the Wilson era of EA has largely focused on franchises that the publisher owns, including Titanfall, Battlefield, and the soon-to-be-released Anthem. Under Wilson’s leadership, EA also doubled down a single game engine, Frostbite, which it would use for almost all of its games, whether or not they made for a good fit. The logic behind this decision was simple: EA owns Frostbite. When it uses Frostbite, EA doesn’t have to pay licensing fees or deal with technical support at a competing engine-maker like Epic. Frostbite is also extraordinarily difficult to use on open-world games like the one that EA just canceled, according to several people who have worked with it, but the publisher believes that the benefits outweigh those detriments.

Compare the Wilson era to previous iterations of EA and you can see this difference. In the past, the publisher has worked with licenses like Harry Potter, The Godfather, James Bond, Warhammer, The Simpsons, and many more. But since Wilson took over in 2013, EA has stuck primarily to Star Wars, sports, and its own franchises (with only a couple of exceptions on mobile).

Wilson’s appetite for original properties could be incompatible with a franchise like Star Wars, which is owned and operated by Disney and its subsidiary, Lucasfilm. Working on a Star Wars game requires constant conversations with Lucasfilm. It means navigating bureaucracy, sorting through a complicated approval process, and realizing that your game is always going to play second fiddle to the movies, TV shows, and everything else that Lucasfilm has in the works. It also means that whatever EA makes, Mickey Mouse will share in the profits.

While EA is a publicly traded company, it does not offer specific sales figures, so there’s no way to know exactly how each of its console and mobile games have performed. And there’s no way to know how much of a cut Disney takes. It’s impossible for an outside observer to say how good the Star Wars deal actually is for EA, just as it’s impossible to say whether it would have been financially wise for EA to have made twice as many Star Wars game as it’s actually released.

The trickier aspects of this Star Wars partnership have certainly rankled developers, which is another reason that fans haven’t gotten what they’ve hoped. Back in 2017, one ex-Visceral developer described the Lucasfilm approval process to me in brutal fashion: “With Star Wars you could be talking months—potentially years… Oh, would [protagonist] Dodger really look like this? What would his weapon look like? Potentially years of that. Would he carry this? Would that really work in the Star Wars universe? With Uncharted, they can build any world they come up with, because it’s their world. With Star Wars you have to have that back and forth… People think, ‘Oh it must be so cool to work on Star Wars.’ It actually kind of sucks.”

It’s not clear what will happen with Star Wars in the coming years. I don’t know the specifics of Disney’s deal with EA, or whether it has any out clauses, or whether there are conversations on either side about bringing it to an end. For years now, fans have expressed desire for the exclusivity deal to go away. Maybe it should have never been made in the first place.

Source: Kotaku.com

YIIK Is A Throwback 90s RPG I Just Can’t Get Into

Screenshot: Ackk Studios (YIIK: A Postmodern RPG)
Kotaku Game DiaryDaily thoughts from a Kotaku staffer about a game we’re playing.  

Alex, the protagonist of YIIK: A Postmodern RPG, is a burned out liberal arts major who returns home after graduating college just as the year 2000 is looming. The player explores his small town of Frankton, stumbles upon a stray cat in the woods, and is soon plunged into a rabbit hole of creepypasta-inspired mysteries woven around feelings of loneliness and alienation. Unfortunately, after playing for about five hours, I already can’t stand to be around Alex anymore.

YIIK, created by Ackk Studios and coming to Switch, PS4, and Steam on January 17, is part visual novel, part adventure game. It’s inspired by the Japanese role-playing games of the 90s, in particular 1994’s Earthbound for the SNES. You find slices of pizza in trash cans that restore health. Alex fights monsters using household objects like vinyl records instead of swords or guns. The game even sports mysterious, inter-dimensional beings who look and behave a whole lot like Starmen. Alex’s quest to find out what they’re all about involves gaining other party members, level grinding, and solving environmental puzzles to progress through the game’s handful of dungeons.

At the same time, YIIK tries to be forward looking, borrowing from the twitch-based mini-games for turn-based combat used in Toby Fox’s Undertale (Fox also contributed some of the music in the game). Each character’s weapon of choice—a vinyl record player, keytar, or digital camera—relies on a unique mechanic. The record player, for instance, requires you to put the needle down on specific spots while the table’s turning in order to rack up the highest hit combo. Defending against enemy attacks is similar, requiring you to press a button at the right time to either limit damage or dodge it altogether.

There’s one traditional feature from Earthbound that YIIK abandoned but probably shouldn’t have: the silent protagonist. Alex talks. A lot. Not just to other people but to himself. All of his lines are voiced, and while the actor performing them does a fine job, the game’s verbose script left me cringing more often than not. Eventually I just rushed through most of his lines by mashing the A button.

It doesn’t help that Alex is a young twenty something who thinks he has interesting ideas about stuff because he took a few courses on philosophy while getting his degree. He always has something to interject, and his internal monologues frequently drag on, peppered with one too many adjectives and adverbs. Blank slates have their virtues in these types of games, especially when paranormal nonsense is lurking around every corner. When a ghost-like girl bleeding from the eyes gets telekinetically dragged out of an elevator by otherworldly beings, you can probably just let that moment hang without further commentary.

After five hours with the game, I’m struggling to hold on to the parts of it I like and ignore the growing presence of the ones I don’t. Pacing is crucial to a throwback like YIIK, but that happens to be one of its biggest weaknesses, with no consistent ebb and flow between working through the main quest and having reasons to go off the main path to just get to know the world better. Loading screens are frequent, whether going through a door or into a battle. The interplay between buying new items and increasing characters’ stats through leveling up is slow and somewhat opaque. My characters don’t seem to be doing that much more damage than when I started, and the reward to time spent fighting a battle seems all over the place. At one point I spent close to 10 minutes fighting a trio of rats. It did not seem worth it.

There may be a method to some of this clumsiness; the game is called A Postmodern RPG, after all. I wouldn’t be completely surprised if later on in the game the layers of nostalgia and unpolished gameplay get slowly pulled back, revealing an even weirder, less-linear game underneath. Sadly, I’m not sure I have the willpower to hold out for any potential breakthrough.

I say sadly because on paper, and in large swaths of the actual game, YIIK should be 100% my jam. Alex’s house, situated in the center of the bright and vibrant Frankton, is a nearly perfect recreation of the home I always wished I’d grown up in. One that had internet before the 2000s. One that was as large and conventional looking as the one the punkish, jackbooted Daria lovingly ridiculed from within in the grunge-era MTV cartoon. One where my bedroom somehow had its own small CRT, PS1, and SNES hooked up and ready to go. These relatable details, lovingly spackled across the game, successfully pulled me in, but they aren’t enough to carry the rest of what I’ve played so far.

I really want to love YIIK: A Postmodern RPG, and at times I do. When its bright colors, eerie music, and nostalgia for early internet message boards and the weird conspiracies they spawned comes together, the game feels exciting to explore and filled with weird possibilities. In between these moments, however, YIIK is hampered by a lack of polish, poor pacing, and overwrought narration.

Source: Kotaku.com

The Division 2 Private Beta Starts Next Month

Ubisoft has announced a private beta for The Division 2, which will give players their first look at the new setting. The private beta will kick off on February 7 and run through February 10. It will be open to everyone who pre-ordered the game and then registered through the official site, where you can also pick your beta platform of choice.

More details on the beta are said to be coming soon, but we can glean some details from what we already know. The Division 2 continues the story of a society-disrupting pandemic, but moves from the first game’s setting in New York City to the US capital, Washington DC. The sequel will bring back the realistic loot-driven RPG elements from the first game, with more focus on player choice to impact the world.

The first game established that a pandemic was spread by infected dollar bills distributed during Black Friday shopping, at which point the Division was dispatched to restore order and contain the outbreak. They apparently failed, however, and now Washington DC is a hollowed-out husk, so the secret government agency is being put back into the field.

The Division 2 on PC will be using the newly launched Epic Games Store for distribution rather than Steam, and Ubisoft recently revealed its system requirements. It’s coming on March 15 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. Check out our pre-order guide for more details.

Source: GameSpot.com

New Dragon Ball FighterZ DLC Character Teased

Dragon Ball FighterZ‘s season pass wrapped up back in September with the release of Android 17, but it appears that a new DLC character is on the way to the fighting game. Ahead of the Dragon Ball FighterZ World Tour Finals this weekend, Bandai Namco teased that “the Warrior from Universe 11 is joining the fight.”

No further details about the upcoming DLC character have been revealed yet, but Bandai Namco is presumably referring to Jiren, one of the Pride Troopers hailing from the aforementioned universe and the most formidable foe Goku and his companions faced off against during the Tournament of Power in Dragon Ball Super. The publisher says it will reveal more information during the World Tour Finals, which take place on January 26-27.

If Jiren is indeed added to the roster, he would mark the ninth DLC character released for Dragon Ball FighterZ. Bandai Namco hasn’t teased if any other additional fighters are also planned for the game, but this does open the doors for a second season of DLC, which hopefully means there’s still a chance Master Roshi can join the fight.

Dragon Ball FighterZ first launched for PS4, Xbox One, and PC last January, with a Nintendo Switch version following this past September. We awarded it a 9/10 in our Dragon Ball FighterZ review, calling it “a Dragon Ball fighting game that can go toe-to-toe with the best of the genre.”

In addition to the new Dragon Ball FighterZ character, Bandai Namco announced that a new Dragon Ball game is in development. The publisher didn’t share any details beyond that, but we’ll likely learn more about it during the Dragon Ball FighterZ World Tour Finals later this month.

Source: GameSpot.com