Category Archives: Game Reviews

Far Cry: New Dawn Review – Scavenge And Recycle

Spoiler alert: At the end of Far Cry 5, the United States gets nuked. Seventeen years later, the region and residents of Hope County have endured and mostly recovered from the devastation anew. The vegetation is more abundant, society has been reshaped, and there is a hell of a lot more duct tape everywhere. Everything feels new and different–well, except for that fact that there’s ruthless, tyrannical oppression taking over everything and it’s up to you, and basically only you, to stop it. Some things never change. That’s Far Cry: New Dawn–despite a few new novelties and a great mechanical twist, New Dawn feels exactly like what it is: a direct continuation of Far Cry 5.

That’s not inherently a bad thing. New Dawn features the same kind of forward-thinking approach to open-world exploration and progression as Far Cry 5. While main missions are mapped out for you, the discovery of side activities like enemy outposts, treasure hunts (formerly prepper stashes), and companion recruitment missions mostly comes from your own organic exploration. Earning perk points to improve your abilities is tied to your discovery of hidden caches and diversifying the activities you undertake. New Dawn is a more concise game–the map is smaller than Far Cry 5 and there’s less curated content to discover this time around–but the emphasis is still on staying out in the world and soaking up the environment.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

That sense of freedom has been diminished, however. It’s not the fact that you’re revisiting Hope County, but rather how New Dawn sets up the pins. In Far Cry 5, you began in the middle of the map and were allowed to explore in any direction you wished; New Dawn starts you off in the bottom corner of the map and basically pushes you in a steady, linear sweep north as you slowly reclaim territory, and asks you to regularly bring resources back to your base in that starting area to bolster it.

What’s to stop you from just darting ahead? Well, damage numbers. New Dawn introduces RPG elements, like damage numbers, into its design for the first time in the series. The game’s guns and enemies fall into four different tiered ranks, and getting ahead requires that you go out into the world to scavenge crafting materials to upgrade your base so you can upgrade your weapons workshop and eventually craft better guns to take down the higher rank enemies impeding your progress. Outfits, armor, and defense numbers don’t factor in your growth, just weapons. Guns at rank 1 and 2 will do a minimal amount of damage to well-armored rank 3 and elite rank enemies.

Early on, this can be annoying if you try to push the limits of the game in a way you’re not meant to. Heading too far into the map and needing to use up hundreds of bullets to take down a rank 3 bear you encounter isn’t terrifying as much as it is silly, and eventually, the demands of story missions will stop you from going too far.

But if you dial down your Far Cry 5-style expectations of freedom and go with the flow, you run into these awkward predicaments far less often. Your guns feel like they do the damage they’re supposed to, and enemies feel like they have an acceptable level of resistance. In fact, once you get access to the top-tier arsenal, things will start to swing wildly in your favor–your guns will feel overpowered to the point where even shooting rank 1 enemies in the foot might be enough to take them out–which feels great when you’re getting overwhelmed. Played the right way, the game’s RPG-style systems basically feel invisible, and you can enjoy Far Cry’s style of weighty gunplay and feel like an incredibly competent one-person army. The feeling of eventually being able to overcome New Dawn’s elite enemies is good, but you’re left wondering why you needed to be held back by artificial gating at all.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

It doesn’t help that there’s no tangible sense of growth with weapons and vehicle crafting; New Dawn’s selection of guns and cars isn’t dramatically different enough between ranks to make the large distinction in damage output believable. Rank 1 weapons are a varied suite of handguns, rifles, and shotguns, and higher-rank arsenals are basically defined by the increasing amount of duct tape and junk on that same suite, as if that stuff has magical properties that makes the guns perform better. There are lots of guns to choose from, but if you’ve played Far Cry 5 you’ll immediately recognize them, duct tape or no.

The one nice exception is the new Saw Launcher, which shoots circular saw blades. Higher tier versions of the weapon actually have noticeably different properties, like the ability to shoot saw blades with ricocheting, homing, and boomerang traits. It’s the only weapon which truly feels like it was borne out of the post-apocalypse, improvised from scavenged parts. Aerosol cans, pipes, and spray paint might give the other guns and cars a cool look, but it doesn’t change how familiar they feel.

No Caption ProvidedNo Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

The same can be said of the world itself. Far Cry 5’s Hope County already felt a bit post-apocalyptic–the rural setting was isolated from the world thanks to antagonist Joseph Seed–so even though there are plenty of visible differences to the region, the impact of those changes isn’t massive. There are a few key locations that provoke some amusement in their discovery, but the strength of Far Cry 5’s Hope County was its natural environments–the forests, lakes, rivers, and mountains. The conceit that the region was re-vegetated by a super bloom after nuclear devastation means that the vibe in New Dawn is basically identical, despite dramatic increases in upended cars and graffiti. It’s a pretty post-apocalypse, but it doesn’t have the feeling of desperation you might associate with the theme. Scavenging for materials doesn’t feel like a drastic necessity, just a way to get ahead. New Dawn doesn’t feel like it takes the theme to enough of an extreme to feel meaningful or different.

The solid bones of Far Cry’s combat are still here, though, and they’re still very good. Taking on outposts (within your rank), whether that be via stealth or aggression, is still enjoyable, and the game encourages you to repeat them at increased difficulties to earn more resources. New Dawn also introduces seven self-contained missions called Expeditions. These are large, diverse maps set outside Hope County, and they feature setpieces like a New Orleans amusement park, an aircraft carrier, and even a Splinter Cell-themed plane crash. Expedition environments are a highlight, but the snatch-and-grab objectives mean that you’re never really encouraged to stop and appreciate them–you’re more concerned with getting the hell out of there as a non-stop stream of enemies comes after you.

The concise nature of the game means there’s a remarkable lack of time given to the characters and plot, too. A few of the major characters feel like they could be interesting, the twin sister antagonists especially, but the few interactions you have with them are definitely not enough to develop them and make you care. While the performances have gusto, key moments of pathos just feel completely unearned. Something major happened to a key character and I was surprised how little empathy I felt. A detestable deal is made and I was mad at how little time they spent justifying it. Underdeveloped connections to characters also exacerbate the relative mundanity of the story missions compared to the game’s side and open-world activities–turret sequences, bland chases, forced melee fights, and even a slow boat ride, all of which go on for way too long.

You do get a double jump, though. That is, the ability to jump in mid-air. You also get the ability to basically turn invisible and give yourself super speed and strength. The Far Cry series has always dabbled in the mystic, but yes: In a strange turn of events, New Dawn eventually says “screw it” and gives you access to superhuman powers. And the way it changes how you approach the world is undoubtedly the best thing about the game.

These sudden powers let you lean hard into superhero fantasy, allowing you to bound over fences and onto buildings, using your newfound mobility and invisibility to completely terrorize enemies like you’re the Predator, or perhaps jumping high into the fray and firing off explosive arrows, pretending you’re Hawkeye from The Avengers. Maybe you’re more of a Wolverine, activating the berserker ability to rush an outpost at super speed and send heavily armed assailants and bears alike flying with your bare fists. A minor new mechanic lets you temporarily pick up shields from enemies and toss them like you’re Captain America (supporting characters even refer to you as “Cap”), and I’m shocked they didn’t do more with this–the inability to permanently keep a shield is a big disappointment.

No Caption ProvidedNo Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

The powers are so good that it’s almost a shame they come at a point late in the game where you’ll likely already be well-equipped to deal with elite rank enemies, since a few scenarios that challenge your ability to use these effectively definitely would have been a welcome addition. But as it stands, they’re a fantastic expansion of Far Cry’s combat vocabulary. They completely elevate your confidence to rip through everything and everyone, suddenly turning New Dawn’s familiar, pedestrian experience into a raucous blast.

There’s a lot of potential in the ideas seeded in New Dawn, but there isn’t enough room for many of them to breathe and feel fully realized. Not the post-apocalyptic theme, not the RPG mechanics, not the weapons, vehicles, plot, or characters. Advancing through the adventure is an enjoyable experience, especially once you get your superhuman powers, but this is largely because Far Cry 5’s combat and progression models remain compelling enough to propel you forward. For its part, New Dawn is a palatable but unremarkable spin-off that feels like it could have achieved so much more.

Source: GameSpot.com

Far Cry New Dawn Review – Mild, Mild World

Spoiler alert: At the end of Far Cry 5, the United States gets nuked. Seventeen years later, the region and residents of Hope County have endured and mostly recovered from the devastation anew. The vegetation is more abundant, society has been reshaped, and there is a hell of a lot more duct tape everywhere. Everything feels new and different–well, except for that fact that there’s ruthless, tyrannical oppression taking over everything and it’s up to you, and basically only you, to stop it. Some things never change. That’s Far Cry New Dawn–despite a few new novelties and a great mechanical twist, New Dawn feels exactly like what it is: a direct continuation of Far Cry 5.

That’s not inherently a bad thing. New Dawn features the same kind of forward-thinking approach to open-world exploration and progression as Far Cry 5. While main missions are mapped out for you, the discovery of side activities like enemy outposts, treasure hunts (formerly prepper stashes), and companion recruitment missions mostly comes from your own organic exploration. Earning perk points to improve your abilities is tied to your discovery of hidden caches and diversifying the activities you undertake. New Dawn is a more concise game–the map is smaller than Far Cry 5 and there’s less curated content to discover this time around–but the emphasis is still on staying out in the world and soaking up the environment.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

That sense of freedom has been diminished, however. It’s not the fact that you’re revisiting Hope County, but rather how New Dawn sets up the pins. In Far Cry 5, you began in the middle of the map and were allowed to explore in any direction you wished; New Dawn starts you off in the bottom corner of the map and basically pushes you in a steady, linear sweep north as you slowly reclaim territory, and asks you to regularly bring resources back to your base in that starting area to bolster it.

What’s to stop you from just darting ahead? Well, damage numbers. New Dawn introduces RPG elements, like damage numbers, into its design for the first time in the series. The game’s guns and enemies fall into four different tiered ranks, and getting ahead requires that you go out into the world to scavenge crafting materials to upgrade your base so you can upgrade your weapons workshop and eventually craft better guns to take down the higher rank enemies impeding your progress. Outfits, armor, and defense numbers don’t factor in your growth, just weapons. Guns at rank 1 and 2 will do a minimal amount of damage to well-armored rank 3 and elite rank enemies.

Early on, this can be annoying if you try to push the limits of the game in a way you’re not meant to. Heading too far into the map and needing to use up hundreds of bullets to take down a rank 3 bear you encounter isn’t terrifying as much as it is silly, and eventually, the demands of story missions will stop you from going too far.

But if you dial down your Far Cry 5-style expectations of freedom and go with the flow, you run into these awkward predicaments far less often. Your guns feel like they do the damage they’re supposed to, and enemies feel like they have an acceptable level of resistance. In fact, once you get access to the top-tier arsenal, things will start to swing wildly in your favor–your guns will feel overpowered to the point where even shooting rank 1 enemies in the foot might be enough to take them out–which feels great when you’re getting overwhelmed. Played the right way, the game’s RPG-style systems basically feel invisible, and you can enjoy Far Cry’s style of weighty gunplay and feel like an incredibly competent one-person army. The feeling of eventually being able to overcome New Dawn’s elite enemies is good, but you’re left wondering why you needed to be held back by artificial gating at all.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

It doesn’t help that there’s no tangible sense of growth with weapons and vehicle crafting; New Dawn’s selection of guns and cars isn’t dramatically different enough between ranks to make the large distinction in damage output believable. Rank 1 weapons are a varied suite of handguns, rifles, and shotguns, and higher-rank arsenals are basically defined by the increasing amount of duct tape and junk on that same suite, as if that stuff has magical properties that makes the guns perform better. There are lots of guns to choose from, but if you’ve played Far Cry 5 you’ll immediately recognize them, duct tape or no.

The one nice exception is the new Saw Launcher, which shoots circular saw blades. Higher tier versions of the weapon actually have noticeably different properties, like the ability to shoot saw blades with ricocheting, homing, and boomerang traits. It’s the only weapon which truly feels like it was borne out of the post-apocalypse, improvised from scavenged parts. Aerosol cans, pipes, and spray paint might give the other guns and cars a cool look, but it doesn’t change how familiar they feel.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

The same can be said of the world itself. Far Cry 5’s Hope County already felt a bit post-apocalyptic–the rural setting was isolated from the world thanks to antagonist Joseph Seed–so even though there are plenty of visible differences to the region, the impact of those changes isn’t massive. There are a few key locations that provoke some amusement in their discovery, but the strength of Far Cry 5’s Hope County was its natural environments–the forests, lakes, rivers, and mountains. The conceit that the region was re-vegetated by a super bloom after nuclear devastation means that the vibe in New Dawn is basically identical, despite dramatic increases in upended cars and graffiti. It’s a pretty post-apocalypse, but it doesn’t have the feeling of desperation you might associate with the theme. Scavenging for materials doesn’t feel like a drastic necessity, just a way to get ahead. New Dawn doesn’t feel like it takes the theme to enough of an extreme to feel meaningful or different.

The solid bones of Far Cry’s combat are still here, though, and they’re still very good. Taking on outposts (within your rank), whether that be via stealth or aggression, is still enjoyable, and the game encourages you to repeat them at increased difficulties to earn more resources. New Dawn also introduces seven self-contained missions called Expeditions. These are large, diverse maps set outside Hope County, and they feature setpieces like a New Orleans amusement park, an aircraft carrier, and even a Splinter Cell-themed plane crash. Expedition environments are a highlight, but the snatch-and-grab objectives mean that you’re never really encouraged to stop and appreciate them–you’re more concerned with getting the hell out of there as a non-stop stream of enemies comes after you.

The concise nature of the game means there’s a remarkable lack of time given to the characters and plot, too. A few of the major characters feel like they could be interesting, the twin sister antagonists especially, but the few interactions you have with them are definitely not enough to develop them and make you care. While the performances have gusto, key moments of pathos just feel completely unearned. Something major happened to a key character and I was surprised how little empathy I felt. A detestable deal is made and I was mad at how little time they spent justifying it. Underdeveloped connections to characters also exacerbate the relative mundanity of the story missions compared to the game’s side and open-world activities–turret sequences, bland chases, forced melee fights, and even a slow boat ride, all of which go on for way too long.

You do get a double jump, though. That is, the ability to jump in mid-air. You also get the ability to basically turn invisible and give yourself super speed and strength. The Far Cry series has always dabbled in the mystic, but yes: In a strange turn of events, New Dawn eventually says “screw it” and gives you access to superhuman powers. And the way it changes how you approach the world is undoubtedly the best thing about the game.

These sudden powers let you lean hard into superhero fantasy, allowing you to bound over fences and onto buildings, using your newfound mobility and invisibility to completely terrorize enemies like you’re the Predator, or perhaps jumping high into the fray and firing off explosive arrows, pretending you’re Hawkeye from The Avengers. Maybe you’re more of a Wolverine, activating the berserker ability to rush an outpost at super speed and send heavily armed assailants and bears alike flying with your bare fists. A minor new mechanic lets you temporarily pick up shields from enemies and toss them like you’re Captain America (supporting characters even refer to you as “Cap”), and I’m shocked they didn’t do more with this–the inability to permanently keep a shield is a big disappointment.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

The powers are so good that it’s almost a shame they come at a point late in the game where you’ll likely already be well-equipped to deal with elite rank enemies, since a few scenarios that challenge your ability to use these effectively definitely would have been a welcome addition. But as it stands, they’re a fantastic expansion of Far Cry’s combat vocabulary. They completely elevate your confidence to rip through everything and everyone, suddenly turning New Dawn’s familiar, pedestrian experience into a raucous blast.

There’s a lot of potential in the ideas seeded in New Dawn, but there isn’t enough room for many of them to breathe and feel fully realized. Not the post-apocalyptic theme, not the RPG mechanics, not the weapons, vehicles, plot, or characters. Advancing through the adventure is an enjoyable experience, especially once you get your superhuman powers, but this is largely because Far Cry 5’s combat and progression models remain compelling enough to propel you forward. For its part, New Dawn is a palatable but unremarkable spin-off that feels like it could have achieved so much more.

Source: GameSpot.com

Far Cry: New Dawn Review – Duct Tape Apocalypse

Spoiler alert: At the end of Far Cry 5, the United States gets nuked. Seventeen years later, the region and residents of Hope County have endured and mostly recovered from the devastation anew. The vegetation is more abundant, society has been reshaped, and there is a hell of a lot more duct tape everywhere. Everything feels new and different–well, except for that fact that there’s ruthless, tyrannical oppression taking over everything and it’s up to you, and basically only you, to stop it. Some things never change. That’s Far Cry: New Dawn–despite a few new novelties and a great mechanical twist, New Dawn feels exactly like what it is: a direct continuation of Far Cry 5.

That’s not inherently a bad thing. New Dawn features the same kind of forward-thinking approach to open-world exploration and progression as Far Cry 5. While main missions are mapped out for you, the discovery of side activities like enemy outposts, treasure hunts (formerly prepper stashes), and companion recruitment missions mostly comes from your own organic exploration. Earning perk points to improve your abilities is tied to your discovery of hidden caches and diversifying the activities you undertake. New Dawn is a more concise game–the map is smaller than Far Cry 5 and there’s less curated content to discover this time around–but the emphasis is still on staying out in the world and soaking up the environment.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

That sense of freedom has been diminished, however. It’s not the fact that you’re revisiting Hope County, but rather how New Dawn sets up the pins. In Far Cry 5, you began in the middle of the map and were allowed to explore in any direction you wished; New Dawn starts you off in the bottom corner of the map and basically pushes you in a steady, linear sweep north as you slowly reclaim territory, and asks you to regularly bring resources back to your base in that starting area to bolster it.

What’s to stop you from just darting ahead? Well, damage numbers. New Dawn introduces RPG elements, like damage numbers, into its design for the first time in the series. The game’s guns and enemies fall into four different tiered ranks, and getting ahead requires that you go out into the world to scavenge crafting materials to upgrade your base so you can upgrade your weapons workshop and eventually craft better guns to take down the higher rank enemies impeding your progress. Outfits, armor, and defense numbers don’t factor in your growth, just weapons. Guns at rank 1 and 2 will do a minimal amount of damage to well-armored rank 3 and elite rank enemies.

Early on, this can be annoying if you try to push the limits of the game in a way you’re not meant to. Heading too far into the map and needing to use up hundreds of bullets to take down a rank 3 bear you encounter isn’t terrifying as much as it is silly, and eventually, the demands of story missions will stop you from going too far.

But if you dial down your Far Cry 5-style expectations of freedom and go with the flow, you run into these awkward predicaments far less often. Your guns feel like they do the damage they’re supposed to, and enemies feel like they have an acceptable level of resistance. In fact, once you get access to the top-tier arsenal, things will start to swing wildly in your favor–your guns will feel overpowered to the point where even shooting rank 1 enemies in the foot might be enough to take them out–which feels great when you’re getting overwhelmed. Played the right way, the game’s RPG-style systems basically feel invisible, and you can enjoy Far Cry’s style of weighty gunplay and feel like an incredibly competent one-person army. The feeling of eventually being able to overcome New Dawn’s elite enemies is good, but you’re left wondering why you needed to be held back by artificial gating at all.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

It doesn’t help that there’s no tangible sense of growth with weapons and vehicle crafting; New Dawn’s selection of guns and cars isn’t dramatically different enough between ranks to make the large distinction in damage output believable. Rank 1 weapons are a varied suite of handguns, rifles, and shotguns, and higher-rank arsenals are basically defined by the increasing amount of duct tape and junk on that same suite, as if that stuff has magical properties that makes the guns perform better. There are lots of guns to choose from, but if you’ve played Far Cry 5 you’ll immediately recognize them, duct tape or no.

The one nice exception is the new Saw Launcher, which shoots circular saw blades. Higher tier versions of the weapon actually have noticeably different properties, like the ability to shoot saw blades with ricocheting, homing, and boomerang traits. It’s the only weapon which truly feels like it was borne out of the post-apocalypse, improvised from scavenged parts. Aerosol cans, pipes, and spray paint might give the other guns and cars a cool look, but it doesn’t change how familiar they feel.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

The same can be said of the world itself. Far Cry 5’s Hope County already felt a bit post-apocalyptic–the rural setting was isolated from the world thanks to antagonist Joseph Seed–so even though there are plenty of visible differences to the region, the impact of those changes isn’t massive. There are a few key locations that provoke some amusement in their discovery, but the strength of Far Cry 5’s Hope County was its natural environments–the forests, lakes, rivers, and mountains. The conceit that the region was re-vegetated by a super bloom after nuclear devastation means that the vibe in New Dawn is basically identical, despite dramatic increases in upended cars and graffiti. It’s a pretty post-apocalypse, but it doesn’t have the feeling of desperation you might associate with the theme. Scavenging for materials doesn’t feel like a drastic necessity, just a way to get ahead. New Dawn doesn’t feel like it takes the theme to enough of an extreme to feel meaningful or different.

The solid bones of Far Cry’s combat are still here, though, and they’re still very good. Taking on outposts (within your rank), whether that be via stealth or aggression, is still enjoyable, and the game encourages you to repeat them at increased difficulties to earn more resources. New Dawn also introduces seven self-contained missions called Expeditions. These are large, diverse maps set outside Hope County, and they feature setpieces like a New Orleans amusement park, an aircraft carrier, and even a Splinter Cell-themed plane crash. Expedition environments are a highlight, but the snatch-and-grab objectives mean that you’re never really encouraged to stop and appreciate them–you’re more concerned with getting the hell out of there as a non-stop stream of enemies comes after you.

The concise nature of the game means there’s a remarkable lack of time given to the characters and plot, too. A few of the major characters feel like they could be interesting, the twin sister antagonists especially, but the few interactions you have with them are definitely not enough to develop them and make you care. While the performances have gusto, key moments of pathos just feel completely unearned. Something major happened to a key character and I was surprised how little empathy I felt. A detestable deal is made and I was mad at how little time they spent justifying it. Underdeveloped connections to characters also exacerbate the relative mundanity of the story missions compared to the game’s side and open-world activities–turret sequences, bland chases, forced melee fights, and even a slow boat ride, all of which go on for way too long.

You do get a double jump, though. That is, the ability to jump in mid-air. You also get the ability to basically turn invisible and give yourself super speed and strength. The Far Cry series has always dabbled in the mystic, but yes: In a strange turn of events, New Dawn eventually says “screw it” and gives you access to superhuman powers. And the way it changes how you approach the world is undoubtedly the best thing about the game.

These sudden powers let you lean hard into superhero fantasy, allowing you to bound over fences and onto buildings, using your newfound mobility and invisibility to completely terrorize enemies like you’re the Predator, or perhaps jumping high into the fray and firing off explosive arrows, pretending you’re Hawkeye from The Avengers. Maybe you’re more of a Wolverine, activating the berserker ability to rush an outpost at super speed and send heavily armed assailants and bears alike flying with your bare fists. A minor new mechanic lets you temporarily pick up shields from enemies and toss them like you’re Captain America (supporting characters even refer to you as “Cap”), and I’m shocked they didn’t do more with this–the inability to permanently keep a shield is a big disappointment.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

The powers are so good that it’s almost a shame they come at a point late in the game where you’ll likely already be well-equipped to deal with elite rank enemies, since a few scenarios that challenge your ability to use these effectively definitely would have been a welcome addition. But as it stands, they’re a fantastic expansion of Far Cry’s combat vocabulary. They completely elevate your confidence to rip through everything and everyone, suddenly turning New Dawn’s familiar, pedestrian experience into a raucous blast.

There’s a lot of potential in the ideas seeded in New Dawn, but there isn’t enough room for many of them to breathe and feel fully realized. Not the post-apocalyptic theme, not the RPG mechanics, not the weapons, vehicles, plot, or characters. Advancing through the adventure is an enjoyable experience, especially once you get your superhuman powers, but this is largely because Far Cry 5’s combat and progression models remain compelling enough to propel you forward. For its part, New Dawn is a palatable but unremarkable spin-off that feels like it could have achieved so much more.

Source: GameSpot.com

Far Cry: New Dawn Review – Tape It Up

Spoiler alert: At the end of Far Cry 5, the United States gets nuked. Seventeen years later, the region and residents of Hope County have endured and mostly recovered from the devastation anew. The vegetation is more abundant, society has been reshaped, and there is a hell of a lot more duct tape everywhere. Everything feels new and different–well, except for that fact that there’s ruthless, tyrannical oppression taking over everything and it’s up to you, and basically only you, to stop it. Some things never change. That’s Far Cry: New Dawn–despite a few new novelties and a great mechanical twist, New Dawn feels exactly like what it is: a direct continuation of Far Cry 5.

That’s not inherently a bad thing. New Dawn features the same kind of forward-thinking approach to open-world exploration and progression as Far Cry 5. While main missions are mapped out for you, the discovery of side activities like enemy outposts, treasure hunts (formerly prepper stashes), and companion recruitment missions mostly comes from your own organic exploration. Earning perk points to improve your abilities is tied to your discovery of hidden caches and diversifying the activities you undertake. New Dawn is a more concise game–the map is smaller than Far Cry 5 and there’s less curated content to discover this time around–but the emphasis is still on staying out in the world and soaking up the environment.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

That sense of freedom has been diminished, however. It’s not the fact that you’re revisiting Hope County, but rather how New Dawn sets up the pins. In Far Cry 5, you began in the middle of the map and were allowed to explore in any direction you wished; New Dawn starts you off in the bottom corner of the map and basically pushes you in a steady, linear sweep north as you slowly reclaim territory, and asks you to regularly bring resources back to your base in that starting area to bolster it.

What’s to stop you from just darting ahead? Well, damage numbers. New Dawn introduces RPG elements, like damage numbers, into its design for the first time in the series. The game’s guns and enemies fall into four different tiered ranks, and getting ahead requires that you go out into the world to scavenge crafting materials to upgrade your base so you can upgrade your weapons workshop and eventually craft better guns to take down the higher rank enemies impeding your progress. Outfits, armor, and defense numbers don’t factor in your growth, just weapons. Guns at rank 1 and 2 will do a minimal amount of damage to well-armored rank 3 and elite rank enemies.

Early on, this can be annoying if you try to push the limits of the game in a way you’re not meant to. Heading too far into the map and needing to use up hundreds of bullets to take down a rank 3 bear you encounter isn’t terrifying as much as it is silly, and eventually, the demands of story missions will stop you from going too far.

But if you dial down your Far Cry 5-style expectations of freedom and go with the flow, you run into these awkward predicaments far less often. Your guns feel like they do the damage they’re supposed to, and enemies feel like they have an acceptable level of resistance. In fact, once you get access to the top-tier arsenal, things will start to swing wildly in your favor–your guns will feel overpowered to the point where even shooting rank 1 enemies in the foot might be enough to take them out–which feels great when you’re getting overwhelmed. Played the right way, the game’s RPG-style systems basically feel invisible, and you can enjoy Far Cry’s style of weighty gunplay and feel like an incredibly competent one-person army. The feeling of eventually being able to overcome New Dawn’s elite enemies is good, but you’re left wondering why you needed to be held back by artificial gating at all.

No Caption Provided
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It doesn’t help that there’s no tangible sense of growth with weapons and vehicle crafting; New Dawn’s selection of guns and cars isn’t dramatically different enough between ranks to make the large distinction in damage output believable. Rank 1 weapons are a varied suite of handguns, rifles, and shotguns, and higher-rank arsenals are basically defined by the increasing amount of duct tape and junk on that same suite, as if that stuff has magical properties that makes the guns perform better. There are lots of guns to choose from, but if you’ve played Far Cry 5 you’ll immediately recognize them, duct tape or no.

The one nice exception is the new Saw Launcher, which shoots circular saw blades. Higher tier versions of the weapon actually have noticeably different properties, like the ability to shoot saw blades with ricocheting, homing, and boomerang traits. It’s the only weapon which truly feels like it was borne out of the post-apocalypse, improvised from scavenged parts. Aerosol cans, pipes, and spray paint might give the other guns and cars a cool look, but it doesn’t change how familiar they feel.

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The same can be said of the world itself. Far Cry 5’s Hope County already felt a bit post-apocalyptic–the rural setting was isolated from the world thanks to antagonist Joseph Seed–so even though there are plenty of visible differences to the region, the impact of those changes isn’t massive. There are a few key locations that provoke some amusement in their discovery, but the strength of Far Cry 5’s Hope County was its natural environments–the forests, lakes, rivers, and mountains. The conceit that the region was re-vegetated by a super bloom after nuclear devastation means that the vibe in New Dawn is basically identical, despite dramatic increases in upended cars and graffiti. It’s a pretty post-apocalypse, but it doesn’t have the feeling of desperation you might associate with the theme. Scavenging for materials doesn’t feel like a drastic necessity, just a way to get ahead. New Dawn doesn’t feel like it takes the theme to enough of an extreme to feel meaningful or different.

The solid bones of Far Cry’s combat are still here, though, and they’re still very good. Taking on outposts (within your rank), whether that be via stealth or aggression, is still enjoyable, and the game encourages you to repeat them at increased difficulties to earn more resources. New Dawn also introduces seven self-contained missions called Expeditions. These are large, diverse maps set outside Hope County, and they feature setpieces like a New Orleans amusement park, an aircraft carrier, and even a Splinter Cell-themed plane crash. Expedition environments are a highlight, but the snatch-and-grab objectives mean that you’re never really encouraged to stop and appreciate them–you’re more concerned with getting the hell out of there as a non-stop stream of enemies comes after you.

The concise nature of the game means there’s a remarkable lack of time given to the characters and plot, too. A few of the major characters feel like they could be interesting, the twin sister antagonists especially, but the few interactions you have with them are definitely not enough to develop them and make you care. While the performances have gusto, key moments of pathos just feel completely unearned. Something major happened to a key character and I was surprised how little empathy I felt. A detestable deal is made and I was mad at how little time they spent justifying it. Underdeveloped connections to characters also exacerbate the relative mundanity of the story missions compared to the game’s side and open-world activities–turret sequences, bland chases, forced melee fights, and even a slow boat ride, all of which go on for way too long.

You do get a double jump, though. That is, the ability to jump in mid-air. You also get the ability to basically turn invisible and give yourself super speed and strength. The Far Cry series has always dabbled in the mystic, but yes: In a strange turn of events, New Dawn eventually says “screw it” and gives you access to superhuman powers. And the way it changes how you approach the world is undoubtedly the best thing about the game.

These sudden powers let you lean hard into superhero fantasy, allowing you to bound over fences and onto buildings, using your newfound mobility and invisibility to completely terrorize enemies like you’re the Predator, or perhaps jumping high into the fray and firing off explosive arrows, pretending you’re Hawkeye from The Avengers. Maybe you’re more of a Wolverine, activating the berserker ability to rush an outpost at super speed and send heavily armed assailants and bears alike flying with your bare fists. A minor new mechanic lets you temporarily pick up shields from enemies and toss them like you’re Captain America (supporting characters even refer to you as “Cap”), and I’m shocked they didn’t do more with this–the inability to permanently keep a shield is a big disappointment.

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The powers are so good that it’s almost a shame they come at a point late in the game where you’ll likely already be well-equipped to deal with elite rank enemies, since a few scenarios that challenge your ability to use these effectively definitely would have been a welcome addition. But as it stands, they’re a fantastic expansion of Far Cry’s combat vocabulary. They completely elevate your confidence to rip through everything and everyone, suddenly turning New Dawn’s familiar, pedestrian experience into a raucous blast.

There’s a lot of potential in the ideas seeded in New Dawn, but there isn’t enough room for many of them to breathe and feel fully realized. Not the post-apocalyptic theme, not the RPG mechanics, not the weapons, vehicles, plot, or characters. Advancing through the adventure is an enjoyable experience, especially once you get your superhuman powers, but this is largely because Far Cry 5’s combat and progression models remain compelling enough to propel you forward. For its part, New Dawn is a palatable but unremarkable spin-off that feels like it could have achieved so much more.

Source: GameSpot.com

Far Cry: New Dawn Review – Reuse And Recycle

Spoiler alert: At the end of Far Cry 5, the United States gets nuked. Seventeen years later, the region and residents of Hope County have endured and mostly recovered from the devastation anew. The vegetation is more abundant, society has been reshaped, and there is a hell of a lot more duct tape everywhere. Everything feels new and different–well, except for that fact that there’s ruthless, tyrannical oppression taking over everything and it’s up to you, and basically only you, to stop it. Some things never change. That’s Far Cry: New Dawn–despite a few new novelties and a great mechanical twist, New Dawn feels exactly like what it is: a direct continuation of Far Cry 5.

That’s not inherently a bad thing. New Dawn features the same kind of forward-thinking approach to open-world exploration and progression as Far Cry 5. While main missions are mapped out for you, the discovery of side activities like enemy outposts, treasure hunts (formerly prepper stashes), and companion recruitment missions mostly comes from your own organic exploration. Earning perk points to improve your abilities is tied to your discovery of hidden caches and diversifying the activities you undertake. New Dawn is a more concise game–the map is smaller than Far Cry 5 and there’s less curated content to discover this time around–but the emphasis is still on staying out in the world and soaking up the environment.

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That sense of freedom has been diminished, however. It’s not the fact that you’re revisiting Hope County, but rather how New Dawn sets up the pins. In Far Cry 5, you began in the middle of the map and were allowed to explore in any direction you wished; New Dawn starts you off in the bottom corner of the map and basically pushes you in a steady, linear sweep north as you slowly reclaim territory, and asks you to regularly bring resources back to your base in that starting area to bolster it.

What’s to stop you from just darting ahead? Well, damage numbers. New Dawn introduces RPG elements, like damage numbers, into its design for the first time in the series. The game’s guns and enemies fall into four different tiered ranks, and getting ahead requires that you go out into the world to scavenge crafting materials to upgrade your base so you can upgrade your weapons workshop and eventually craft better guns to take down the higher rank enemies impeding your progress. Outfits, armor, and defense numbers don’t factor in your growth, just weapons. Guns at rank 1 and 2 will do a minimal amount of damage to well-armored rank 3 and elite rank enemies.

Early on, this can be annoying if you try to push the limits of the game in a way you’re not meant to. Heading too far into the map and needing to use up hundreds of bullets to take down a rank 3 bear you encounter isn’t terrifying as much as it is silly, and eventually, the demands of story missions will stop you from going too far.

But if you dial down your Far Cry 5-style expectations of freedom and go with the flow, you run into these awkward predicaments far less often. Your guns feel like they do the damage they’re supposed to, and enemies feel like they have an acceptable level of resistance. In fact, once you get access to the top-tier arsenal, things will start to swing wildly in your favor–your guns will feel overpowered to the point where even shooting rank 1 enemies in the foot might be enough to take them out–which feels great when you’re getting overwhelmed. Played the right way, the game’s RPG-style systems basically feel invisible, and you can enjoy Far Cry’s style of weighty gunplay and feel like an incredibly competent one-person army. The feeling of eventually being able to overcome New Dawn’s elite enemies is good, but you’re left wondering why you needed to be held back by artificial gating at all.

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It doesn’t help that there’s no tangible sense of growth with weapons and vehicle crafting; New Dawn’s selection of guns and cars isn’t dramatically different enough between ranks to make the large distinction in damage output believable. Rank 1 weapons are a varied suite of handguns, rifles, and shotguns, and higher-rank arsenals are basically defined by the increasing amount of duct tape and junk on that same suite, as if that stuff has magical properties that makes the guns perform better. There are lots of guns to choose from, but if you’ve played Far Cry 5 you’ll immediately recognize them, duct tape or no.

The one nice exception is the new Saw Launcher, which shoots circular saw blades. Higher tier versions of the weapon actually have noticeably different properties, like the ability to shoot saw blades with ricocheting, homing, and boomerang traits. It’s the only weapon which truly feels like it was borne out of the post-apocalypse, improvised from scavenged parts. Aerosol cans, pipes, and spray paint might give the other guns and cars a cool look, but it doesn’t change how familiar they feel.

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The same can be said of the world itself. Far Cry 5’s Hope County already felt a bit post-apocalyptic–the rural setting was isolated from the world thanks to antagonist Joseph Seed–so even though there are plenty of visible differences to the region, the impact of those changes isn’t massive. There are a few key locations that provoke some amusement in their discovery, but the strength of Far Cry 5’s Hope County was its natural environments–the forests, lakes, rivers, and mountains. The conceit that the region was re-vegetated by a super bloom after nuclear devastation means that the vibe in New Dawn is basically identical, despite dramatic increases in upended cars and graffiti. It’s a pretty post-apocalypse, but it doesn’t have the feeling of desperation you might associate with the theme. Scavenging for materials doesn’t feel like a drastic necessity, just a way to get ahead. New Dawn doesn’t feel like it takes the theme to enough of an extreme to feel meaningful or different.

The solid bones of Far Cry’s combat are still here, though, and they’re still very good. Taking on outposts (within your rank), whether that be via stealth or aggression, is still enjoyable, and the game encourages you to repeat them at increased difficulties to earn more resources. New Dawn also introduces seven self-contained missions called Expeditions. These are large, diverse maps set outside Hope County, and they feature setpieces like a New Orleans amusement park, an aircraft carrier, and even a Splinter Cell-themed plane crash. Expedition environments are a highlight, but the snatch-and-grab objectives mean that you’re never really encouraged to stop and appreciate them–you’re more concerned with getting the hell out of there as a non-stop stream of enemies comes after you.

The concise nature of the game means there’s a remarkable lack of time given to the characters and plot, too. A few of the major characters feel like they could be interesting, the twin sister antagonists especially, but the few interactions you have with them are definitely not enough to develop them and make you care. While the performances have gusto, key moments of pathos just feel completely unearned. Something major happened to a key character and I was surprised how little empathy I felt. A detestable deal is made and I was mad at how little time they spent justifying it. Underdeveloped connections to characters also exacerbate the relative mundanity of the story missions compared to the game’s side and open-world activities–turret sequences, bland chases, forced melee fights, and even a slow boat ride, all of which go on for way too long.

You do get a double jump, though. That is, the ability to jump in mid-air. You also get the ability to basically turn invisible and give yourself super speed and strength. The Far Cry series has always dabbled in the mystic, but yes: In a strange turn of events, New Dawn eventually says “screw it” and gives you access to superhuman powers. And the way it changes how you approach the world is undoubtedly the best thing about the game.

These sudden powers let you lean hard into superhero fantasy, allowing you to bound over fences and onto buildings, using your newfound mobility and invisibility to completely terrorize enemies like you’re the Predator, or perhaps jumping high into the fray and firing off explosive arrows, pretending you’re Hawkeye from The Avengers. Maybe you’re more of a Wolverine, activating the berserker ability to rush an outpost at super speed and send heavily armed assailants and bears alike flying with your bare fists. A minor new mechanic lets you temporarily pick up shields from enemies and toss them like you’re Captain America (supporting characters even refer to you as “Cap”), and I’m shocked they didn’t do more with this–the inability to permanently keep a shield is a big disappointment.

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The powers are so good that it’s almost a shame they come at a point late in the game where you’ll likely already be well-equipped to deal with elite rank enemies, since a few scenarios that challenge your ability to use these effectively definitely would have been a welcome addition. But as it stands, they’re a fantastic expansion of Far Cry’s combat vocabulary. They completely elevate your confidence to rip through everything and everyone, suddenly turning New Dawn’s familiar, pedestrian experience into a raucous blast.

There’s a lot of potential in the ideas seeded in New Dawn, but there isn’t enough room for many of them to breathe and feel fully realized. Not the post-apocalyptic theme, not the RPG mechanics, not the weapons, vehicles, plot, or characters. Advancing through the adventure is an enjoyable experience, especially once you get your superhuman powers, but this is largely because Far Cry 5’s combat and progression models remain compelling enough to propel you forward. For its part, New Dawn is a palatable but unremarkable spin-off that feels like it could have achieved so much more.

Source: GameSpot.com

Jump Force Review – Shonen Through And Through

Jump Force is a celebration of 50 years of Weekly Shonen Jump manga, featuring nearly four dozen fighters from 16 of the magazine’s most iconic stories. Bandai Namco’s arena tag-team fighting game borrows plenty of elements from its source materials, for better and worse. Although Jump Force’s campaign story drags on for way too long and ignores what could have been interesting character interactions in favor of repeated excuses for everyone to punch the crap out of each other, its combat is an enjoyable dance between two teams of fighters–thanks to the game’s excellent mechanics and flashy visuals.

In Jump Force, you’re an ordinary human who’s caught up in a warzone when the Dragon Ball, One Piece, and Naruto universes collide into our world and bring their assortment of heroes and villains with them. After being mortally wounded by Frieza, you’re resurrected as a hero capable of learning the powers, skills, and abilities of Shonen Jump’s characters, and you decide to join Goku, Luffy, and Naruto’s Jump Force of allies in order to fix everyone’s broken world. What follows is a fairly stereotypical shonen affair, with your character growing stronger over time, enemies and friends switching sides, and a mysterious evil working behind the scenes. Like most fighting games, there’s not a single problem you don’t ultimately just fix with your fists, from deciding team leader to knocking sense into those who have been corrupted by the same evil forces responsible for everyone’s worlds colliding with one another.

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There’s a decent story in Jump Force, but it’s buried beneath a second act that goes on for far too long. After getting acquainted with your new allies, the game tasks you with responding to threats around the globe, as well as the recruitment of any additional heroes who’ve managed to stumble into our world from their respective universes. Character models during cutscenes are all rather cookie-cutter, as everyone stands in the same position throughout the story, only stiffly moving their mouths and occasionally blinking. The actual story moves with the same awkwardly slow pace, and it doesn’t explain what’s going on with everyone’s worlds or what the villains’ motivations are until the third act, so you play through most of the game without any idea as to what you’re really fighting against. Not being able to skip cutscenes is also rather annoying, as exiting out of a mission for any reason–such as buying more items to use in combat–has you watch the same 40- to 90-second scene again.

There are brief snippets where you can see how a side story might have helped flesh out the characters, which in turn could have been a good incentive to keep pushing forward through the campaign. For example, Boruto recognizes a sadness behind the eyes of My Hero Academia’s Midoriya and confides with the young hero that he knows how hard it is to live up to the ideal of father figures. But the game breezes past moments like this in order to get to the next fight.

Thankfully, those fights are a blast to play. Every combatant comes equipped with an assortment of attacks, blocks, grabs, counters, and dodges that operate in a rock-paper-scissors system. Combat is fairly accessible, and it doesn’t take long to understand how the basic mechanics work. However, with over 40 playable fighters, it takes time to get a handle on the entire roster’s assortment of strengths and weaknesses, giving you plenty of reason to keep playing. Each fighter has four distinct and unique special attacks as well. Even though these special moves can be broken down into one of seven different types–short-range, dashing, counter, area-of-effect, long-range, shield, or buff–each fighter handles quite differently. If you’ve read the manga that these characters come from, you already have a fairly good idea as to what most of these iconic moves are and how they behave, but you’ll still have to practice with each fighter to get a grasp of what every move can do.

Every attack, basic or advanced, can be avoided in some way–whether via blocking, dodging, or countering–so most fights are tense, with each side looking for a way to bait their foe into opening themselves up for attack without putting themselves at a disadvantage. I’ve had fights where, after 30 seconds of back-and-forth, both sides are one strike away from defeat, and the battle continues for another full minute of counters, perfect dodges, and last-second blocks. It’s empowering to finish off your foe with a perfectly executed combo or snag a victory when all hope seems lost. Each win feels like it needs to be earned, and this encourages you to explore the varied movesets of each fighter, experiment in how attacks might be chained together, and deduce your go-to characters’ weaknesses in order to avoid defeat.

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This is especially true in regards to the campaign, as you’re allowed to customize your character with any four special abilities you want. You can also choose your character’s gender, body type, voice, and skin tone, as well as dress them with an assortment of hairstyles, make-up, jewelry, and clothes, allowing you to build your perfect protagonist. Completing campaign missions earns you in-game currency, which you can use to buy new outfits and items. Cosmetics won’t affect your character, but it’s still fun to put together outfits and it’s a welcome distraction when you need a moment to step away from the steep challenge of the late-game battles.

Once you’re done with Jump Force’s campaign, there’s still plenty to do–even if not all of it is worthwhile. Free Missions are the game’s version of a challenge mode, but it’s not all that different from the handicaps placed on you in late-game story missions. The same can be said for Extra Missions mode, which you can play if you need a little extra in-game cash for that smokin’ pair of black pants you’ve been eyeing for your character or if you want to expand your level cap.

However, a lot of fun can be had in Jump Force’s competitive modes. You can play online or off, with both friendly and ranked matches in the former. Online is where your skills will be put to the test, meaning it’s also where you’ll find the game’s best fights. Jump Force also allows you to practice against a computer while you wait for the game to find you an opponent, so you’re not just waiting on a loading screen, which is a welcome touch. Ranked Play provides the most challenging combat in Jump Force by far, but earning higher titles–and thus bragging rights–by defeating more skilled opponents is a compelling goal to work towards.

Each win feels like it needs to be earned, and this encourages you to explore the varied movesets of each fighter.

It’s awesome to see Jump Force’s roster of playable fighters include so many characters from Shonen Jump’s history, even the ones from manga that aren’t as mainstream but no less important, like JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure and Saint Seiya. That said, there’s a disappointing disparity in the number of male and female characters, especially when Dragon Ball, One Piece, and Naruto contribute to nearly half the roster and only have two women between all three of them. Shonen Jump has always been geared towards young boys, but that doesn’t mean its manga hasn’t had great female fighters. Including Dragon Ball’s Piccolo over Android 18 and Naruto’s Gaara over both Sakura and Hinata is odd, as is leaving out Black Clover’s Noelle, Yu-Gi-Oh’s Anzu, My Hero Academia’s Uraraka, and Boruto’s Sarada.

Jump Force is a worthy celebration of the legacy of Shonen Jump manga, but it honors its source material a little too well with how filler-heavy the middle of its story arc is. However, even if the game rarely provides a clear motivation for stopping evil other than good must always oppose it, the act of stomping out villains in Jump Force’s frantic bouts of tag-team arena combat is an enjoyable test of strategy. And with over 40 characters to master, there’s ample opportunity to develop new strategies and reach greater feats of combat prowess in online multiplayer.

Source: GameSpot.com

Jump Force Review – A Little Too Shonen

Jump Force is a celebration of 50 years of Weekly Shonen Jump manga, featuring nearly four dozen fighters from 16 of the magazine’s most iconic stories. Bandai Namco’s arena tag-team fighting game borrows plenty of elements from its source materials, for better and worse. Although Jump Force’s campaign story drags on for way too long and ignores what could have been interesting character interactions in favor of repeated excuses for everyone to punch the crap out of each other, its combat is an enjoyable dance between two teams of fighters–thanks to the game’s excellent mechanics and flashy visuals.

In Jump Force, you’re an ordinary human who’s caught up in a warzone when the Dragon Ball, One Piece, and Naruto universes collide into our world and bring their assortment of heroes and villains with them. After being mortally wounded by Frieza, you’re resurrected as a hero capable of learning the powers, skills, and abilities of Shonen Jump’s characters, and you decide to join Goku, Luffy, and Naruto’s Jump Force of allies in order to fix everyone’s broken world. What follows is a fairly stereotypical shonen affair, with your character growing stronger over time, enemies and friends switching sides, and a mysterious evil working behind the scenes. Like most fighting games, there’s not a single problem you don’t ultimately just fix with your fists, from deciding team leader to knocking sense into those who have been corrupted by the same evil forces responsible for everyone’s worlds colliding with one another.

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There’s a decent story in Jump Force, but it’s buried beneath a second act that goes on for far too long. After getting acquainted with your new allies, the game tasks you with responding to threats around the globe, as well as the recruitment of any additional heroes who’ve managed to stumble into our world from their respective universes. Character models during cutscenes are all rather cookie-cutter, as everyone stands in the same position throughout the story, only stiffly moving their mouths and occasionally blinking. The actual story moves with the same awkwardly slow pace, and it doesn’t explain what’s going on with everyone’s worlds or what the villains’ motivations are until the third act, so you play through most of the game without any idea as to what you’re really fighting against. Not being able to skip cutscenes is also rather annoying, as exiting out of a mission for any reason–such as buying more items to use in combat–has you watch the same 40- to 90-second scene again.

There are brief snippets where you can see how a side story might have helped flesh out the characters, which in turn could have been a good incentive to keep pushing forward through the campaign. For example, Boruto recognizes a sadness behind the eyes of My Hero Academia’s Midoriya and confides with the young hero that he knows how hard it is to live up to the ideal of father figures. But the game breezes past moments like this in order to get to the next fight.

Thankfully, those fights are a blast to play. Every combatant comes equipped with an assortment of attacks, blocks, grabs, counters, and dodges that operate in a rock-paper-scissors system. Combat is fairly accessible, and it doesn’t take long to understand how the basic mechanics work. However, with over 40 playable fighters, it takes time to get a handle on the entire roster’s assortment of strengths and weaknesses, giving you plenty of reason to keep playing. Each fighter has four distinct and unique special attacks as well. Even though these special moves can be broken down into one of seven different types–short-range, dashing, counter, area-of-effect, long-range, shield, or buff–each fighter handles quite differently. If you’ve read the manga that these characters come from, you already have a fairly good idea as to what most of these iconic moves are and how they behave, but you’ll still have to practice with each fighter to get a grasp of what every move can do.

Every attack, basic or advanced, can be avoided in some way–whether via blocking, dodging, or countering–so most fights are tense, with each side looking for a way to bait their foe into opening themselves up for attack without putting themselves at a disadvantage. I’ve had fights where, after 30 seconds of back-and-forth, both sides are one strike away from defeat, and the battle continues for another full minute of counters, perfect dodges, and last-second blocks. It’s empowering to finish off your foe with a perfectly executed combo or snag a victory when all hope seems lost. Each win feels like it needs to be earned, and this encourages you to explore the varied movesets of each fighter, experiment in how attacks might be chained together, and deduce your go-to characters’ weaknesses in order to avoid defeat.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

This is especially true in regards to the campaign, as you’re allowed to customize your character with any four special abilities you want. You can also choose your character’s gender, body type, voice, and skin tone, as well as dress them with an assortment of hairstyles, make-up, jewelry, and clothes, allowing you to build your perfect protagonist. Completing campaign missions earns you in-game currency, which you can use to buy new outfits and items. Cosmetics won’t affect your character, but it’s still fun to put together outfits and it’s a welcome distraction when you need a moment to step away from the steep challenge of the late-game battles.

Once you’re done with Jump Force’s campaign, there’s still plenty to do–even if not all of it is worthwhile. Free Missions are the game’s version of a challenge mode, but it’s not all that different from the handicaps placed on you in late-game story missions. The same can be said for Extra Missions mode, which you can play if you need a little extra in-game cash for that smokin’ pair of black pants you’ve been eyeing for your character or if you want to expand your level cap.

However, a lot of fun can be had in Jump Force’s competitive modes. You can play online or off, with both friendly and ranked matches in the former. Online is where your skills will be put to the test, meaning it’s also where you’ll find the game’s best fights. Jump Force also allows you to practice against a computer while you wait for the game to find you an opponent, so you’re not just waiting on a loading screen, which is a welcome touch. Ranked Play provides the most challenging combat in Jump Force by far, but earning higher titles–and thus bragging rights–by defeating more skilled opponents is a compelling goal to work towards.

Each win feels like it needs to be earned, and this encourages you to explore the varied movesets of each fighter.

It’s awesome to see Jump Force’s roster of playable fighters include so many characters from Shonen Jump’s history, even the ones from manga that aren’t as mainstream but no less important, like JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure and Saint Seiya. That said, there’s a disappointing disparity in the number of male and female characters, especially when Dragon Ball, One Piece, and Naruto contribute to nearly half the roster and only have two women between all three of them. Shonen Jump has always been geared towards young boys, but that doesn’t mean its manga hasn’t had great female fighters. Including Dragon Ball’s Piccolo over Android 18 and Naruto’s Gaara over both Sakura and Hinata is odd, as is leaving out Black Clover’s Noelle, Yu-Gi-Oh’s Anzu, My Hero Academia’s Uraraka, and Boruto’s Sarada.

Jump Force is a worthy celebration of the legacy of Shonen Jump manga, but it honors its source material a little too well with how filler-heavy the middle of its story arc is. However, even if the game rarely provides a clear motivation for stopping evil other than good must always oppose it, the act of stomping out villains in Jump Force’s frantic bouts of tag-team arena combat is an enjoyable test of strategy. And with over 40 characters to master, there’s ample opportunity to develop new strategies and reach greater feats of combat prowess in online multiplayer.

Source: GameSpot.com

Jump Force Review – The Gang’s All Here

Jump Force is a celebration of 50 years of Weekly Shonen Jump manga, featuring nearly four dozen fighters from 16 of the magazine’s most iconic stories. Bandai Namco’s arena tag-team fighting game borrows plenty of elements from its source materials, for better and worse. Although Jump Force’s campaign story drags on for way too long and ignores what could have been interesting character interactions in favor of repeated excuses for everyone to punch the crap out of each other, its combat is an enjoyable dance between two teams of fighters–thanks to the game’s excellent mechanics and flashy visuals.

In Jump Force, you’re an ordinary human who’s caught up in a warzone when the Dragon Ball, One Piece, and Naruto universes collide into our world and bring their assortment of heroes and villains with them. After being mortally wounded by Frieza, you’re resurrected as a hero capable of learning the powers, skills, and abilities of Shonen Jump’s characters, and you decide to join Goku, Luffy, and Naruto’s Jump Force of allies in order to fix everyone’s broken world. What follows is a fairly stereotypical shonen affair, with your character growing stronger over time, enemies and friends switching sides, and a mysterious evil working behind the scenes. Like most fighting games, there’s not a single problem you don’t ultimately just fix with your fists, from deciding team leader to knocking sense into those who have been corrupted by the same evil forces responsible for everyone’s worlds colliding with one another.

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There’s a decent story in Jump Force, but it’s buried beneath a second act that goes on for far too long. After getting acquainted with your new allies, the game tasks you with responding to threats around the globe, as well as the recruitment of any additional heroes who’ve managed to stumble into our world from their respective universes. Character models during cutscenes are all rather cookie-cutter, as everyone stands in the same position throughout the story, only stiffly moving their mouths and occasionally blinking. The actual story moves with the same awkwardly slow pace, and it doesn’t explain what’s going on with everyone’s worlds or what the villains’ motivations are until the third act, so you play through most of the game without any idea as to what you’re really fighting against. Not being able to skip cutscenes is also rather annoying, as exiting out of a mission for any reason–such as buying more items to use in combat–has you watch the same 40- to 90-second scene again.

There are brief snippets where you can see how a side story might have helped flesh out the characters, which in turn could have been a good incentive to keep pushing forward through the campaign. For example, Boruto recognizes a sadness behind the eyes of My Hero Academia’s Midoriya and confides with the young hero that he knows how hard it is to live up to the ideal of father figures. But the game breezes past moments like this in order to get to the next fight.

Thankfully, those fights are a blast to play. Every combatant comes equipped with an assortment of attacks, blocks, grabs, counters, and dodges that operate in a rock-paper-scissors system. Combat is fairly accessible, and it doesn’t take long to understand how the basic mechanics work. However, with over 40 playable fighters, it takes time to get a handle on the entire roster’s assortment of strengths and weaknesses, giving you plenty of reason to keep playing. Each fighter has four distinct and unique special attacks as well. Even though these special moves can be broken down into one of seven different types–short-range, dashing, counter, area-of-effect, long-range, shield, or buff–each fighter handles quite differently. If you’ve read the manga that these characters come from, you already have a fairly good idea as to what most of these iconic moves are and how they behave, but you’ll still have to practice with each fighter to get a grasp of what every move can do.

Every attack, basic or advanced, can be avoided in some way–whether via blocking, dodging, or countering–so most fights are tense, with each side looking for a way to bait their foe into opening themselves up for attack without putting themselves at a disadvantage. I’ve had fights where, after 30 seconds of back-and-forth, both sides are one strike away from defeat, and the battle continues for another full minute of counters, perfect dodges, and last-second blocks. It’s empowering to finish off your foe with a perfectly executed combo or snag a victory when all hope seems lost. Each win feels like it needs to be earned, and this encourages you to explore the varied movesets of each fighter, experiment in how attacks might be chained together, and deduce your go-to characters’ weaknesses in order to avoid defeat.

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This is especially true in regards to the campaign, as you’re allowed to customize your character with any four special abilities you want. You can also choose your character’s gender, body type, voice, and skin tone, as well as dress them with an assortment of hairstyles, make-up, jewelry, and clothes, allowing you to build your perfect protagonist. Completing campaign missions earns you in-game currency, which you can use to buy new outfits and items. Cosmetics won’t affect your character, but it’s still fun to put together outfits and it’s a welcome distraction when you need a moment to step away from the steep challenge of the late-game battles.

Once you’re done with Jump Force’s campaign, there’s still plenty to do–even if not all of it is worthwhile. Free Missions are the game’s version of a challenge mode, but it’s not all that different from the handicaps placed on you in late-game story missions. The same can be said for Extra Missions mode, which you can play if you need a little extra in-game cash for that smokin’ pair of black pants you’ve been eyeing for your character or if you want to expand your level cap.

However, a lot of fun can be had in Jump Force’s competitive modes. You can play online or off, with both friendly and ranked matches in the former. Online is where your skills will be put to the test, meaning it’s also where you’ll find the game’s best fights. Jump Force also allows you to practice against a computer while you wait for the game to find you an opponent, so you’re not just waiting on a loading screen, which is a welcome touch. Ranked Play provides the most challenging combat in Jump Force by far, but earning higher titles–and thus bragging rights–by defeating more skilled opponents is a compelling goal to work towards.

Each win feels like it needs to be earned, and this encourages you to explore the varied movesets of each fighter.

It’s awesome to see Jump Force’s roster of playable fighters include so many characters from Shonen Jump’s history, even the ones from manga that aren’t as mainstream but no less important, like JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure and Saint Seiya. That said, there’s a disappointing disparity in the number of male and female characters, especially when Dragon Ball, One Piece, and Naruto contribute to nearly half the roster and only have two women between all three of them. Shonen Jump has always been geared towards young boys, but that doesn’t mean its manga hasn’t had great female fighters. Including Dragon Ball’s Piccolo over Android 18 and Naruto’s Gaara over both Sakura and Hinata is odd, as is leaving out Black Clover’s Noelle, Yu-Gi-Oh’s Anzu, My Hero Academia’s Uraraka, and Boruto’s Sarada.

Jump Force is a worthy celebration of the legacy of Shonen Jump manga, but it honors its source material a little too well with how filler-heavy the middle of its story arc is. However, even if the game rarely provides a clear motivation for stopping evil other than good must always oppose it, the act of stomping out villains in Jump Force’s frantic bouts of tag-team arena combat is an enjoyable test of strategy. And with over 40 characters to master, there’s ample opportunity to develop new strategies and reach greater feats of combat prowess in online multiplayer.

Source: GameSpot.com

Metro Exodus Review – Light At The End Of The Tunnel

Beyond the dark, oppressive tunnels and radioactive surface of Moscow are the societies that emerge from a nuclear apocalypse and prospective lands habitable for new life. It’s a sensible change in setting that broadens Metro’s horizons, though it sometimes loses the focus the series is known for. Still, the firefights and stealth deliver a familiar and incredible tension, complemented by streamlined survival mechanics necessary to face terrifying threats. But with Artyom and friends punching a one-way train ticket in hopes of greener pastures, Metro Exodus becomes a journey more about the enduring relationships and ties that bind an earnest crew of survivors.

In the opening hours, returning protagonist Artyom is shown with a tenacious insistence that human life exists outside the metro. It gets him into serious trouble, and it’s further revealed that a larger conspiracy is at play. Your departure seems all too sudden and a bit of a disservice to the hardships endured in the previous games, but the heat of the moment and gut instincts of your companions help ease you into the premise of a year-long expedition to wherever the railroads lead.

The way the map works in Metro Exodus is a nice touch.
The way the map works in Metro Exodus is a nice touch.
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Thus, Metro Exodus takes the franchise in a bold direction by having a few significant chapters dedicated to open sandbox-style environments where you’re free to roam, explore non-critical points of interest, and follow the main story path. Exploration tends to not be a reward in itself as these open areas are sparse and struggle to incentivize you to venture far off. Doing so pits you against mutants that force you to expend valuable resources for very little in return. Navigating isn’t entirely enjoyable whether it be because of the sluggish rowboats in the Volga or empty lands of the Caspian. It sometimes feels as if Metro’s methodical movement was thrown into much larger spaces it wasn’t meant for. Thankfully, the game reins it in for its other chapters, especially when you make it to the lush forest of the Taiga that masterfully guides you to and from open areas and confined spaces at a tempered pace.

It’s a sensible change in setting that broadens Metro’s horizons, though it sometimes loses the focus the series is known for.

During your time in the open areas, optional side quests will organically populate your map by way of environmental hints or characters mentioning a point of interest in dialogue. These aren’t traditional side quests that get logged into a checklist; instead, they’re opportunities to experience more of Metro’s tense combat scenarios and lead to potentially finding new equipment, scavenging additional resources, or extracting smaller stories that feed into the bigger picture.

Despite the addition of open environments, Exodus primarily plays similarly to previous games, and for the majority of the time it channels the series existing strengths. Carefully laid out levels strike a balance between freedom of approach and linear, focused paths to objectives when you face human enemies, creating a fine flow within missions. Sure, some guards will have their backs conveniently turned or make silly moves in combat, but the overarching thrill that you can swiftly kill or be killed lingers. Another Metro staple of fighting mutated beasts delivers a different style of tension. Irradiated spiders, nimble mutants, and lurking amphibians strike fear as you brace for their attack in ravaged pitch-dark corridors and flooded buildings. Even the harmless spiders that crawl on your arm and across your face further build a terrifying atmosphere. It’s a state of vulnerability covered in a layer of dread that Metro gets right yet again.

Hardly do you ever feel either unfairly disadvantaged or overpowered, as weapons fire with impact and can be a challenge to handle. Each firearm has a roster of modifications that you’ll scavenge from enemy weapons–sights, scopes, barrels, loading mechanisms–which give you control of how you want to fight. This wide variety of customization options can turn a dinky revolver into a formidable long-range weapon or a janky Kalashnikov into a devastating assault rifle–it’s a satisfying system that gives gunplay an additional layer of depth. Modding can also be done using your backpack at any time, giving you the chance to adapt to situations as they arise.

Workbenches and your backpack are saving graces in Metro Exodus, since there are no longer any shops to buy equipment and items. Gone is the clever system of trading in military-grade bullets for critical items; in its place is a crafting system that’s both manageable and fitting for the survivalist mentality Exodus instills. You’ll accumulate scrap metal and chemicals to craft medkits, filters, and ammo, and maintain weapon condition. Even when you’re juggling systems such as keeping your flashlight charged and changing out gasmask filters, it never becomes overbearing and adds an enjoyable challenge of gear management even as you’re fending off foes throughout.

For the most part, Metro Exodus does away with the supernatural by leaving the clairvoyant Dark Ones in the past. In venturing into the unknown, the game tends to rely on familiar post-apocalyptic tropes. You have the cultists who’ve brainwashed locals to shun technology, a society of cannibals who put up an orderly front, and slavers who exploit and abuse others. But Exodus uses them to lay the groundwork for its better moments between characters and the struggles they endure. And despite the story being less centered around Artyom–who oddly remains a silent protagonist outside of loading screen monologues–Exodus unfolds in a much more personal fashion. The broader examinations of humanity and psychological twists have been dialed back to make room for a more grounded story about the necessary sacrifices you make for the ones you love.

These characters are brought to life with an impressive amount of dialogue that seems to go on forever, but because the moments of levity have a degree of charm and earnestness, you’ll want to stay and listen.

The best parts of the story are found in chapters between the action where you simply hang out aboard the Aurora, the train that functions as headquarters. Here you have the chance to tune the radio to eavesdrop on transmissions that play off of in-game events or listen to some sweet tunes, but more importantly, it’s your opportunity to unravel the endearing personalities that make up your crew. These characters are brought to life with an impressive amount of dialogue that seems to go on forever, but because the moments of levity have a degree of charm and earnestness, you’ll want to stay and listen. It’s not without a few lines that feel contextually out of place, though the natural flow of dialogue and interactions between the team communicates just as much about them as the stories they tell.

Anna shares her thoughts about the life she hopes to build with you as she rests her head on your lap. Damir’s commitment to his ethnic roots and what remains of his homeland of Kazakhstan leads to a bittersweet exchange. Stepan, the big softy, is an uplifting presence who also fills the air with his acoustic guitar. And Miller is the hardened leader exemplifying the tough love of a father figure who wants the best for you and his daughter Anna. These are just a few of the characters that represent the best in Metro Exodus’ narrative.

Anna is one of the several great characters in Metro Exodus' story.
Anna is one of the several great characters in Metro Exodus’ story.
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The exact narrative threads can change, however; Metro’s morality system makes a return, subtly judging your actions without explicitly revealing itself. What’s important is that it doesn’t always force you into non-lethal approach; if you want to cut the throats of the heartless slavers or take a shotgun to a cannibal’s head, by all means do so, and as long as you don’t hurt the innocent, you’re in the clear. And with a keen eye or sharp ear, you may also come across unexpected events that’ll pay off depending on your course of action. Consequences don’t make themselves immediately apparent, but can lead to fascinating results as the story progresses.

It’s worth noting that technical issues are strewn throughout Metro Exodus. In one playthrough (pre-day one patch), I’ve fallen through the game world just after an auto-save, inexplicably lost upgraded equipment I couldn’t get back at a workbench, and had some rare, but noticeable framerate drops at modest settings with a fairly high-end PC. They didn’t break the game, but can frustrate and negate hard-earned progress. In the few hours spent with the PS4 version, the game was stable, and as expected it ran on a lower framerate than a capable PC. It’s not always a smooth ride, though it doesn’t take away from the gripping journey that the game takes you on.

You may miss the mystery and intrigue of the previous games, but Exodus puts together a charismatic crew of friends and family that you’ll want to follow to the ends of the earth.

At first glance, Metro Exodus gives you that wide-open, free, and dangerous world unbound by tunnels, though the scope of its tale focuses on what drives you personally and the lengths you’re willing to go to protect what matters most. The open sandboxes may not be strongest addition, but the game still embraces the sense of vulnerability and post-apocalyptic terror alongside impactful weapons used in refined combat and stealth scenarios. You may miss the mystery and intrigue of the previous games, but Exodus puts together a charismatic crew of friends and family that you’ll want to follow to the ends of the earth.

Source: GameSpot.com

Metro Exodus Review – Brand New Days

Beyond the dark, oppressive tunnels and radioactive surface of Moscow are the societies that emerge from a nuclear apocalypse and prospective lands habitable for new life. It’s a sensible change in setting that broadens Metro’s horizons, though it sometimes loses the focus the series is known for. Still, the firefights and stealth deliver a familiar and incredible tension, complemented by streamlined survival mechanics necessary to face terrifying threats. But with Artyom and friends punching a one-way train ticket in hopes of greener pastures, Metro Exodus becomes a journey more about the enduring relationships and ties that bind an earnest crew of survivors.

In the opening hours, returning protagonist Artyom is shown with a tenacious insistence that human life exists outside the metro. It gets him into serious trouble, and it’s further revealed that a larger conspiracy is at play. Your departure seems all too sudden and a bit of a disservice to the hardships endured in the previous games, but the heat of the moment and gut instincts of your companions help ease you into the premise of a year-long expedition to wherever the railroads lead.

The way the map works in Metro Exodus is a nice touch.
The way the map works in Metro Exodus is a nice touch.
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Thus, Metro Exodus takes the franchise in a bold direction by having a few significant chapters dedicated to open sandbox-style environments where you’re free to roam, explore non-critical points of interest, and follow the main story path. Exploration tends to not be a reward in itself as these open areas are sparse and struggle to incentivize you to venture far off. Doing so pits you against mutants that force you to expend valuable resources for very little in return. Navigating isn’t entirely enjoyable whether it be because of the sluggish rowboats in the Volga or empty lands of the Caspian. It sometimes feels as if Metro’s methodical movement was thrown into much larger spaces it wasn’t meant for. Thankfully, the game reins it in for its other chapters, especially when you make it to the lush forest of the Taiga that masterfully guides you to and from open areas and confined spaces at a tempered pace.

During your time in the open areas, optional side quests will organically populate your map by way of environmental hints or characters mentioning a point of interest in dialogue. These aren’t traditional side quests that get logged into a checklist; instead, they’re opportunities to experience more of Metro’s tense combat scenarios and lead to potentially finding new equipment, scavenging additional resources, or extracting smaller stories that feed into the bigger picture.

Despite the addition of open environments, Exodus primarily plays similarly to previous games, and for the majority of the time it channels the series existing strengths. Carefully laid out levels strike a balance between freedom of approach and linear, focused paths to objectives when you face human enemies, creating a fine flow within missions. Sure, some guards will have their backs conveniently turned or make silly moves in combat, but the overarching thrill that you can swiftly kill or be killed lingers. Another Metro staple of fighting mutated beasts delivers a different style of tension. Irradiated spiders, nimble mutants, and lurking amphibians strike fear as you brace for their attack in ravaged pitch-dark corridors and flooded buildings. Even the harmless spiders that crawl on your arm and across your face further build a terrifying atmosphere. It’s a state of vulnerability covered in a layer of dread that Metro gets right yet again.

Hardly do you ever feel either unfairly disadvantaged or overpowered, as weapons fire with impact and can be a challenge to handle. Each firearm has a roster of modifications that you’ll scavenge from enemy weapons–sights, scopes, barrels, loading mechanisms–which give you control of how you want to fight. This wide variety of customization options can turn a dinky revolver into a formidable long-range weapon or a janky Kalashnikov into a devastating assault rifle–it’s a satisfying system that gives gunplay an additional layer of depth. Modding can also be done using your backpack at any time, giving you the chance to adapt to situations as they arise.

Workbenches and your backpack are saving graces in Metro Exodus, since there are no longer any shops to buy equipment and items. Gone is the clever system of trading in military-grade bullets for critical items; in its place is a crafting system that’s both manageable and fitting for the survivalist mentality Exodus instills. You’ll accumulate scrap metal and chemicals to craft medkits, filters, and ammo, and maintain weapon condition. Even when you’re juggling systems such as keeping your flashlight charged and changing out gasmask filters, it never becomes overbearing and adds an enjoyable challenge of gear management even as you’re fending off foes throughout.

For the most part, Metro Exodus does away with the supernatural by leaving the clairvoyant Dark Ones in the past. In venturing into the unknown, the game tends to rely on familiar post-apocalyptic tropes. You have the cultists who’ve brainwashed locals to shun technology, a society of cannibals who put up an orderly front, and slavers who exploit and abuse others. But Exodus uses them to lay the groundwork for its better moments between characters and the struggles they endure. And despite the story being less centered around Artyom–who oddly remains a silent protagonist outside of loading screen monologues–Exodus unfolds in a much more personal fashion. The broader examinations of humanity and psychological twists have been dialed back to make room for a more grounded story about the necessary sacrifices you make for the ones you love.

These characters are brought to life with an impressive amount of dialogue that seems to go on forever, but because the moments of levity have a degree of charm and earnestness, you’ll want to stay and listen.

The best parts of the story are found in chapters between the action where you simply hang out aboard the Aurora, the train that functions as headquarters. Here you have the chance to tune the radio to eavesdrop on transmissions that play off of in-game events or listen to some sweet tunes, but more importantly, it’s your opportunity to unravel the endearing personalities that make up your crew. These characters are brought to life with an impressive amount of dialogue that seems to go on forever, but because the moments of levity have a degree of charm and earnestness, you’ll want to stay and listen. It’s not without a few lines that feel contextually out of place, though the natural flow of dialogue and interactions between the team communicates just as much about them as the stories they tell.

Anna shares her thoughts about the life she hopes to build with you as she rests her head on your lap. Damir’s commitment to his ethnic roots and what remains of his homeland of Kazakhstan leads to a bittersweet exchange. Stepan, the big softy, is an uplifting presence who also fills the air with his acoustic guitar. And Miller is the hardened leader exemplifying the tough love of a father figure who wants the best for you and his daughter Anna. These are just a few of the characters that represent the best in Metro Exodus’ narrative.

Anna is one of the several great characters in Metro Exodus' story.
Anna is one of the several great characters in Metro Exodus’ story.
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

The exact narrative threads can change, however; Metro’s morality system makes a return, subtly judging your actions without explicitly revealing itself. What’s important is that it doesn’t always force you into a non-lethal approach; if you want to cut the throats of the heartless slavers or take a shotgun to a cannibal’s head, by all means do so, and as long as you don’t hurt the innocent, you’re in the clear. And with a keen eye or sharp ear, you may also come across unexpected events that’ll pay off depending on your course of action. Consequences don’t make themselves immediately apparent, but can lead to fascinating results as the story progresses.

It’s worth noting that technical issues are strewn throughout Metro Exodus. In one playthrough (pre-day one patch), I’ve fallen through the game world just after an auto-save, inexplicably lost upgraded equipment I couldn’t get back at a workbench, and had some rare, but noticeable framerate drops at modest settings with a fairly high-end PC. They didn’t break the game, but can frustrate and negate hard-earned progress. In the few hours spent with the PS4 version, the game was stable, and as expected it ran on a lower framerate than a capable PC. It’s not always a smooth ride, though it doesn’t take away from the gripping journey that the game takes you on.

You may miss the mystery and intrigue of the previous games, but Exodus puts together a charismatic crew of friends and family that you’ll want to follow to the ends of the earth.

At first glance, Metro Exodus gives you that wide-open, free, and dangerous world unbound by tunnels, though the scope of its tale focuses on what drives you personally and the lengths you’re willing to go to protect what matters most. The open sandboxes may not be strongest addition, but the game still embraces the sense of vulnerability and post-apocalyptic terror alongside impactful weapons used in refined combat and stealth scenarios. You may miss the mystery and intrigue of the previous games, but Exodus puts together a charismatic crew of friends and family that you’ll want to follow to the ends of the earth.

Source: GameSpot.com