How To Make Ace Combat VR Even More Immersive

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This is Taka. He’s really into fighter planes and has figured out how to up the immersion factor in Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown.

Taka turned his PS Vita headset into a Joint Helmet-Mounted Cueing System and mounted it on a helmet.

Brilliant!

According to Taka, he spent around 200,000 yen ($1,825) ordering the gear from the U.S. with the mask, costing around 90,000 yen ($821), being the most expensive part.

It might have been a bit too immersive because Taka said he threw up while playing Ace Combat 7 in VR mode.

Gran Turismo, however, was more enjoyable for him in VR!

For more, you can follow Taka on Twitter.

Source: Kotaku.com

Detective Pikachu Trailer Just Dealt A Fart Joke 

Since 1996, when Pokémon debuted, I have not once wondered whether or not a Pikachu can fart. Then I watched the latest Detective Pikachu trailer.

The film is the first live-action Hollywood adaptation of the world of Pokémon, fart jokes and all. Is this movie canon?

I’m not anti-fart joke! Not at all.

This trailer ain’t George Carlin, sure, but at least we now know Pokémon can fart. I guess!

Source: Kotaku.com

How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wound up on a Donkey Kong 64 Twitch charity stream

H.Bomberguy, aka Harry Brewis, has been streaming Nintendo 64 game Donkey Kong 64 on and off for the past 50-plus hours. He’s doing so to raise money for U.K.-based charity Mermaids, an organization that offers support for transgender children, teenagers, and their families. What started off as an endeavor to “spite” an Irish comedian who opposes the charity organization has turned into a wild, surprising success; Brewis has raised more than $280,000 so far, and his stream has featured cameo appearances from Doom co-creator John Romero, activist Chelsea Manning, and U.S. congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Brewis started his stream on Twitch on Jan. 18. In a YouTube video announcing the stream, he said he’d never beaten Donkey Kong 64 as a kid. His old save file purportedly shows 59-plus hours of playtime, but just 69 percent completion. Brewis’ goal for the charity stream was to beat the N64 game 100 percent.

“I want to destroy Donkey Kong 64,” he said.

His other target of destruction was writer-director-comedian Graham Linehan, whose work includes the sitcoms Father Ted and The IT Crowd. In a since-deleted message board post, Linehan promoted an email campaign questioning Mermaids’ funding by the National Lottery. Brewis explained that Linehan was the catalyst for his fundraising effort.

“All the proceeds from this stream will go to Mermaids, a charity which works to provide resources and support to young people with gender dysphoria,” Brewis said. “I chose to support this charity, because as a person living in Britain, I find the media discussion surrounding this issue in my country, especially in its tabloids to be woefully misinformed. And I’d like to do my bit to help support the people who do the hard work of contributing to peoples’ thinking on an important issue.

“I chose Mermaids in specific because when they were designated some funding by the National Lottery, Graham Linehan, a comedy writer who did some work on a good show, uh, 20 years ago who happens to be very normal man who’s just just very angry about trans people all day nowadays went on Mumsnet and told them to email a lady from the National Lottery en masse and now the funding is under review. So well done, Graham! You have a massive audience and the power to choose to fight for progress in all the many forms we need in the world right now and you used it to make sure some children won’t have access to helpful resources.”

Brewis’ stream had already raised more than $50,000 in its first 24 hours, speedily heading toward an ever-increasing fundraising goal. People like John Romero, Jim Sterling, and Chelsea Manning popped onto the stream, apparently via Brewis’ Discord channel, but it was the appearance of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the Democratic U.S. Representative for New York’s 14th congressional district and who is very good at Twitter, that drew the most attention.

So how did she wind up there? We can thank Aaron Sorkin, creator of television series The West Wing and The Newsroom.

Sorkin appeared on CNN this week and spoke to host Fareed Zakaria, saying that he likes “the new crop of young people who were just elected to Congress” but that they “now need to stop acting like young people.” (At 29, Ocasio-Cortez is the youngest woman to serve in Congress.) Sorkin said that Democrats have “an opportunity to be the non-stupid party,” adding, “it’s not just about transgender bathrooms — that’s a Republican talking point they’re trying to distract you with.”

Ocasio-Cortez criticized Sorkin’s comments in a Twitter thread and concluded with a retweet from Mermaids that was promoting the Donkey Kong 64 stream. Shortly after — and after numerous requests on Twitter for Ocasio-Cortez to appear on stream — she joined Discord and had a chat with H.Bomberguy to help raise money. Ocasio-Cortez said that while she never owned a Nintendo 64 herself, her cousin did, and thanks to games like Super Mario 64 and Pokémon Snap, she considers it “probably the best system out of all of them.”

Apparently, Ocasio-Cortez has had games on the brain this weekend, based on another pair of tweets in which she name-dropped Dance Dance Revolution and brought the classic Zero Wing meme “All your base are belong to us” out of internet storage.

If you’d like to watch H.Bomberguy do his thing (and donate), he’s still streaming.

Source: Polygon.com

Here’s Overwatch’s First New Skins From Year Of The Pig

Overwatch has begun teasing its next in-game event, 2019’s Lunar New Year. The annual event focuses on Chinese culture and often introduces new skins based on Chinese historical figures or folklore. Blizzard has revealed its first three skins for the upcoming Year of the Pig, with fresh looks for Reaper, Hanzo, and Reinhardt.

The skins were rolled out on the official Twitter account. Reaper gets a new look as Lu Bu Reaper. Hanzo grows a mighty beard as Huang Zhong Hanzo. Finally, Reinhardt loses the helmet for Guan Yu Reinhardt. All three are modeled after generals who lived during the Han dynasty, so there’s a definite theme to the inclusions so far.

Year of the Pig will begin on January 24 and last through February 8. New skins are being debuted daily through Twitter and Facebook. That leaves a few more days for more skin reveals. Some possible contenders include Brigitte, Wrecking Ball, and Ashe, all of which were released after the last Lunar New Year event.

Last year’s Lunar New Year event was the Year of the Dog, which debuted a host of new skins and a capture-the-flag mode. The most recent Overwatch event focused on Ana and paired with a free skin for the character, right on the heels of the annual Winter Wonderland event.

 

 

 

Source: GameSpot.com

AOC Breaks the Internet by Dropping in on Charity Twitch Stream for Trans Kids 

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty

It’s logical to fear that any politician with a semblance of humanity will eventually disappoint us. But somehow, in defiance of our low expectations, freshman Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez just keeps getting cooler. This evening she became perhaps the first Congressperson to ever appear on a Twitch stream, and certainly the first Congressperson to guest on a charity Twitch stream supporting trans rights.

To the collective internet’s shock and joy, AOC joined Youtuber H.bomberguy to discuss trans rights during his epic, 50-hours-and-counting Donkey Kong 64 stream. The money raised during his stream will go to support Mermaids, a UK charity for trans children that has been the subject of a moral panic.

Ocasio-Cortez initially tweeted about the stream, before joining it herself.

The look on H.bomberguy’s face when he realizes he’s speaking to Ocasio-Cortez is genuinely heartwarming. A streamer captured the moment:

She also spoke about why N64 is the best gaming platform, and how discrimination hurts trans people’s ability to remain financially stable.

“[Discrimination] makes these issues much more acute in their crises… it’s important that we talk about these issues in an economic frame, but not let go of the fact that discrimination is a core reason for economic hardship,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

The stream was initially inspired by Irish writer and comedian Graham Linehan, who wrote popular sitcom The IT Crowd. He regularly criticizes the charity and trans people in general. Linehan is one of several prominent UK entertainment figures who are critical of gender dysphoria treatment for young people, which can include delaying puberty. He was previously warned by the police following harassment of a trans woman on Twitter.

It sure looks like the joke’s on Lineham, because H.bomberguy’s quest to play Donkey Kong 64 to 101% completion has now raised more than $250,000 for Mermaids. And the stream isn’t over yet.

Shout out to AOC, the only good politician.

Source: Kotaku.com

Mario & Luigi: Bowser’s Inside Story + Bowser Jr.’s Journey Review

It’s not every day a hero gets a chance to literally walk around in their mortal enemy’s shoes, which is what made Bowser’s Inside Story such a bizarre but wildly unique concept back in 2009. Even though not much has changed since its original DS release, it’s still one of the stronger Mario RPGs, and its innovative gimmick remains exciting on 3DS. The setup here is that a mysterious affliction called the Blorps is spreading across the Mushroom Kingdom thanks to Fawful, an obnoxious trickster who’s been handing out poisoned mushrooms. Naturally, Mario and Luigi are on the job, but after Bowser gets suckered into eating one of the mushrooms, he ends up with a surprising side effect: accidentally swallowing everything in his current field of vision, including the Mario Brothers. As Fawful makes a play to take over the kingdom, Bowser heads out to get some fiery payback with some unexpected help from the Mario Bros.

That’s where the inventive gimmick comes in. You switch back and forth between controlling Bowser on the top screen (punching enemies and obstacles and burning down trees) and controlling Mario and Luigi in 2D inside Bowser’s body (running, jumping, hitting things with hammers, and sliding down what you can only pray are literal pipes). Specific puzzles on Bowser’s side require some assistance on the inside from Mario and Luigi, like shocking his muscles to give him more power to push things, and some actions Bowser performs will affect Mario and Luigi–Bowser drinking water will flood the bottom screen. If Bowser uses the mushroom’s power to swallow his foes, Mario and Luigi will be responsible for finishing the enemy off internally. There’s an abundance of cleverness in this story–inspired moments where you are, essentially, playing co-op with yourself, and it’s exciting to wonder how it will bend your brain next.

No Caption Provided

The fundamentals of combat are building off the same-old turn-based Mario RPG mechanics, where attacks have a chance of doing extra damage and you have a chance to defend yourself using carefully timed button presses. There are very few surprises for anyone who played on DS, but a graphical overhaul on 3DS changes the cartoonish watercolors of the original game to something closer to 1996’s Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars. It’s not as bright and immediately eye-catching, but there’s a gentle, storybookish beauty to it.

As far as gameplay is concerned, the series always been delightfully accessible, and the only difference here is the minor learning curve of remembering which buttons control which characters (Bowser’s actions use X; Mario and Luigi use A and B; specific to this port, Y controls both brothers at the same time). That said, the game does go a bit too easy on you most of the play time. The game never gets truly challenging until the latter third, and by then, if you’re playing carefully, you’ve learned how to counter every enemy and racked up a massive collection of recovery items. As a result, fights quickly become an unwelcome hindrance on the way to more story after a while.

Thankfully, the story and writing do drive you forward. There are body-based jokes at every opportunity, Bowser is humorously angry and obtuse, and the Globins–Bowser’s melodramatic cellular structures–frequently try to steal the show with their laments. Even just the bizarre little moments of Mario and Luigi speaking to each other in pseudo-Italian are a joy. The entire concept of Fantastic Voyage-but-Nintendo is ripe with possibilities for outlandish twists and turns and distortions to characters we all know and love. Having that apply to someone other than the usual Mario Bros. crew is a special treat, especially for the more ambitious moments, like having to turn the 3DS on its side to play as a giant-sized Bowser. More than all this, though, it’s a chance to get to know Mario’s archnemesis in more detail.

This is the rare opportunity that makes the game’s brand new side-story, Bowser Jr’s Journey, worthwhile for many of the same reasons. It’s an odd little real-time strategy game that more resembles a wonky sumo match than, say, Starcraft. Bowser Jr. himself is the commander sending waves of baddies across the screen to butt heads with others, dealing damage based on a rock-paper-scissors system of weakness. Like the main game, there isn’t a terrible amount of difficulty in getting through each battle, and these fights are also a lot less interesting and dynamic. There’s a lot more waiting around for enough damage to happen, or for Jr. to accumulate enough points to activate special moves.

There’s an abundance of cleverness in this story–inspired moments where you are, essentially, playing co-op with yourself, and it’s exciting to wonder how it will bend your brain next.

If there’s a redeeming quality to Bowser Jr.’s tale, it’s that it gives us the first real look at familial relations within the Bowser clan in ages. Jr.’s tale takes place after his dad goes off to his sit-down with Princess Peach about Blorps. In Bowser’s absence, Jr. takes it upon himself to make a move to take over the kingdom. Unfortunately, his bratty overzealousness ends up earning the ire of the other Koopalings as well as the three wacky underlings Fawful plants in Bowser’s Kingdom. And yet, as the story goes along, there’s a strangely heartfelt streak to the proceedings, of a kid who really just wants his dad’s approval and figuring out that he has to earn it, not throw tantrums for it. Towards the end, you’re almost rooting for the little guy, and it makes the interminable nature of the fights worthwhile.

The extra mode certainly sweetens the pot for those who owned Bowser’s Inside Story on DS, but fundamentally, it’s the same game. If anything, the real drawback is the game coming off as an unnecessary surprise on the 3DS–which can already play the original game via backward compatibility. But the game itself remains one of Mario’s RPG best, and it’s a cheerful, inventive journey.

Source: GameSpot.com

Mario & Luigi: Bowser’s Inside Story + Bowser Jr.’s Journey Review

It’s not every day a hero gets a chance to literally walk around in their mortal enemy’s shoes, which is what made Bowser’s Inside Story such a bizarre but wildly unique concept back in 2009. Even though not much has changed since its original DS release, it’s still one of the stronger Mario RPGs, and its innovative gimmick remains exciting on 3DS. The setup here is that a mysterious affliction called the Blorps is spreading across the Mushroom Kingdom thanks to Fawful, an obnoxious trickster who’s been handing out poisoned mushrooms. Naturally, Mario and Luigi are on the job, but after Bowser gets suckered into eating one of the mushrooms, he ends up with a surprising side effect: accidentally swallowing everything in his current field of vision, including the Mario Brothers. As Fawful makes a play to take over the kingdom, Bowser heads out to get some fiery payback with some unexpected help from the Mario Bros.

That’s where the inventive gimmick comes in. You switch back and forth between controlling Bowser on the top screen (punching enemies and obstacles and burning down trees) and controlling Mario and Luigi in 2D inside Bowser’s body (running, jumping, hitting things with hammers, and sliding down what you can only pray are literal pipes). Specific puzzles on Bowser’s side require some assistance on the inside from Mario and Luigi, like shocking his muscles to give him more power to push things, and some actions Bowser performs will affect Mario and Luigi–Bowser drinking water will flood the bottom screen. If Bowser uses the mushroom’s power to swallow his foes, Mario and Luigi will be responsible for finishing the enemy off internally. There’s an abundance of cleverness in this story–inspired moments where you are, essentially, playing co-op with yourself, and it’s exciting to wonder how it will bend your brain next.

No Caption Provided

The fundamentals of combat are building off the same-old turn-based Mario RPG mechanics, where attacks have a chance of doing extra damage and you have a chance to defend yourself using carefully timed button presses. There are very few surprises for anyone who played on DS, but a graphical overhaul on 3DS changes the cartoonish watercolors of the original game to something closer to 1996’s Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars. It’s not as bright and immediately eye-catching, but there’s a gentle, storybookish beauty to it.

As far as gameplay is concerned, the series always been delightfully accessible, and the only difference here is the minor learning curve of remembering which buttons control which characters (Bowser’s actions use X; Mario and Luigi use A and B; specific to this port, Y controls both brothers at the same time). That said, the game does go a bit too easy on you most of the play time. The game never gets truly challenging until the latter third, and by then, if you’re playing carefully, you’ve learned how to counter every enemy and racked up a massive collection of recovery items. As a result, fights quickly become an unwelcome hindrance on the way to more story after a while.

Thankfully, the story and writing do drive you forward. There are body-based jokes at every opportunity, Bowser is humorously angry and obtuse, and the Globins–Bowser’s melodramatic cellular structures–frequently try to steal the show with their laments. Even just the bizarre little moments of Mario and Luigi speaking to each other in pseudo-Italian are a joy. The entire concept of Fantastic Voyage-but-Nintendo is ripe with possibilities for outlandish twists and turns and distortions to characters we all know and love. Having that apply to someone other than the usual Mario Bros. crew is a special treat, especially for the more ambitious moments, like having to turn the 3DS on its side to play as a giant-sized Bowser. More than all this, though, it’s a chance to get to know Mario’s archnemesis in more detail.

This is the rare opportunity that makes the game’s brand new side-story, Bowser Jr’s Journey, worthwhile for many of the same reasons. It’s an odd little real-time strategy game that more resembles a wonky sumo match than, say, Starcraft. Bowser Jr. himself is the commander sending waves of baddies across the screen to butt heads with others, dealing damage based on a rock-paper-scissors system of weakness. Like the main game, there isn’t a terrible amount of difficulty in getting through each battle, and these fights are also a lot less interesting and dynamic. There’s a lot more waiting around for enough damage to happen, or for Jr. to accumulate enough points to activate special moves.

There’s an abundance of cleverness in this story–inspired moments where you are, essentially, playing co-op with yourself, and it’s exciting to wonder how it will bend your brain next.

If there’s a redeeming quality to Bowser Jr.’s tale, it’s that it gives us the first real look at familial relations within the Bowser clan in ages. Jr.’s tale takes place after his dad goes off to his sit-down with Princess Peach about Blorps. In Bowser’s absence, Jr. takes it upon himself to make a move to take over the kingdom. Unfortunately, his bratty overzealousness ends up earning the ire of the other Koopalings as well as the three wacky underlings Fawful plants in Bowser’s Kingdom. And yet, as the story goes along, there’s a strangely heartfelt streak to the proceedings, of a kid who really just wants his dad’s approval and figuring out that he has to earn it, not throw tantrums for it. Towards the end, you’re almost rooting for the little guy, and it makes the interminable nature of the fights worthwhile.

The extra mode certainly sweetens the pot for those who owned Bowser’s Inside Story on DS, but fundamentally, it’s the same game. If anything, the real drawback is the game coming off as an unnecessary surprise on the 3DS–which can already play the original game via backward compatibility. But the game itself remains one of Mario’s RPG best, and it’s a cheerful, inventive journey.

Source: GameSpot.com

Fantastic Beasts 3 Production Delayed, But Not Very Long

The third of five planned Fantastic Beasts movies has hit a bit of a speedbump. Production on the film was expected to begin this July, but now cameras are set to start rolling in the Fall, according to a new report from Deadline. Why the production delay?

According to the site, Warner Bros. simply wants more time in pre-production, which sounds like a good thing. The move is supposedly part of management’s belief that giving the creative teams more time will lead to a better end result, and again, that sounds like a good thing.

Previous Warner Bros. administrations had the tendency to rush event films to meet release dates, and in this case Fantastic Beasts 3 was rumored to be 2020. Warner Bros. executives now have a new approach of allowing big productions to brew as needed,” Deadline said.

According to the report, Fantastic Beasts actors are now being told about the production delay so they can adjust their own schedules accordingly.

2016’s Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them made $814 million worldwide, with 2018’s sequel Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald taking in $648.8 million globally. Together they have made around $1.4 billion.

Both films were directed by David Yates, and he’s expected to direct the third one as well. The series stars Eddie Redmayne as magizoologist Newt Scamander in a story written by J.K. Rowling and set before the events of the Harry Potter series.

Source: GameSpot.com

Brawl Stars Mixes Battle Royale & Dota 2 Into A Fun Mobile Game

Image: Supercell

I was being chased. I couldn’t get away. I ran into a nearby bush and yet I wasn’t safe. I was almost dead. I yelled out to a friend nearby to help, but I didn’t need to say anything. They had seen the chase and ran into to save me, pushing my pursuer away from me and letting my team win. We cheered and immediately jumped into another match. This was my experience during a recent match of Brawl Stars, a free-to-play mobile game.

Brawls Stars is the latest game from mobile developers Supercell, best know for their previous games Clash of Clans and Clash Royale. When Clash Royale first came out I played it for weeks. But it quickly became more of a grind then a game. So I was very hesitant to try out Brawl Stars. Luckily, Supercell has made Brawl Stars significantly less grind heavy than their other games.

The in-game store

Let’s get this out of the way now: Brawl Stars has micro-transactions and loot boxes. There is no getting around it and if you won’t play a game that includes these elements, I understand. But I play a lot of mobile games and Brawl Stars feels nicer than most games when it comes to forcing players to spend cash. I’ve not hit a point yet where I needed to spend any money.

Brawl Stars thankfully does away with timers or paywalls. It always lets you play, no matter how many matches you’ve already completed. These matches will always earn you trophies, which unlock new rewards via a battle pass like system.

Earning trophies unlocks new rewards on the “Trophy Road”

I keep coming back to Brawl Stars because it always feels fresh. It reminds me of Fortnite in how often something new is available. Every day game modes and maps rotate in and out. The end result is I always have something new to check out each time I play. Also like Fortnite, Brawl Stars includes a battle royale mode. This mode and a MOBA inspired gem collecting mode, never rotate out of the game.

Showdown, the battle royale mode in Brawl Stars, is simple, fast and fun. This is for a few reasons. One is how small the map is. You will run into players often. The map also shrinks much faster than in games like PUBG or Fortnite. Finally, the top down camera angle allows you to see players from all angles. Which means you can easily spot enemies or get spotted by other players. The mode supports 10 players and can be played solo or with a partner.

The other popular and permanent mode is Gem Grab. This game mode, as the name implies, has players grabbing gems. These gems spawn in the middle of the map. First team to grab 10 and hold them long enough, wins.

A match of Gem Grab

This mode feels like a simplified MOBA. I was reminded of Heroes of The Storm, which does a great job of streamlining some of the more tricky or boring parts of MOBAs. Gem Grab is even simpler. There is only one objective and one way to win: Grab 10 gems.

While there are different maps for Gem Grab, they all contain bushes and walls. Players can hide in bushes, like in most MOBAs, and can use walls for cover. (Though be careful, some super attacks break walls and destroy bushes.)

While Gem Grab and the other modes in Brawl Stars are simple, they aren’t boring to play. There is a surprising about of strategy involved when playing.

For example, in Gem Grab collecting gems is great, but it also makes you a big target to the enemy team. But if one player has all of your gems, it’s much easier to hide and protect them from attacks. But it also means you have to trust your teammate with all of your game winning gems. But if you spread them out, like have one player grab three and someone else grab 7, it becomes harder to keep track of gems and where they are on the map.

Different brawlers you can unlock

The amount of strategy in Brawls Stars is perfect. The game doesn’t support chat or even emotes, so unless your playing with friends you will have no way to communicate with the other two players on your team. So every mode is designed to be easily playable with randoms. It also means if you make a mistake nobody can yell at you in chat.

Brawl Stars controls well and feels perfectly built for mobile devices. Holding the device sideways, you move using a virtual left stick and aim using virtual right stick. But I rarely ever aim. Instead players can just tap the right side of the screen and auto attack the closet enemy. This is perfect when you are being chased and need to shoot behind you.

Do enough damage to enemy players and you will earn a super ability. This varies depending on your brawler, but these supers can help save a teammate, stop an enemy or create a shortcut.

The simple modes, easy to use controls and short matches make Brawls Stars a perfect game to play for a few minutes and then slide your phone back into your pocket.

Source: Kotaku.com

M. Night Shyamalan Financed Glass Himself To The Tune Of $20 Million

Director M. Night Shyamalan has a history of self-financing his movies, and that continued with his latest effort, Glass. According to Forbes, Shyamalan made Glass with $20 million of his own money. That money was a combination of the earnings from his two most recent movies, Split and The Visit, as well as collateral from his 125-acre estate in Pennsylvania.

According to the report, Shyamalan took out a $5 million loan on his home years ago pay for The Visit. The movie was a huge success, going on to make $98 million worldwide. For Split, Shyamalan paid the $9 million production budget himself, and then reaped the benefits, as the movie earned a massive $278 million at the box office. The successes of The Visit and Split, as well as the aforementioned collateral, allowed Shyamalan to cover Glass’ $20 million production budget.

Glass is expected to make more than $40 million in the US and Canada alone this weekend, according to Entertainment Weekly, so it appears it’ll be another profitable film for Shyamalan.

As Forbes points out, it’s not uncommon for up-and-coming directors to finance their films with their own money, but Shyamalan is an established director whose movies make a lot of money no matter what you say about their quality. One reason why Shyamalan opts to finance his movies out of his own pocket is because when big studio money gets involved, directors like Shyamalan generally have to give up some amount of creative control. Shyamalan financing movies himself theoretically gives him more freedom.

Glass, which stars James McAvoy, Samuel L. Jackson, and Bruce Willis, has received a mixed critical reaction. GameSpot’s review said it was a disappointment in some ways, while other critics had problems with it, too. For more, check out GameSpot’s Glass review roundup to see what other critics are saying.

Source: GameSpot.com

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