Tag Archives: mario kart wii

Three Incredible Mario Kart Wii Shortcut Glitches Discovered Within 24 Hours

Mario Kart Wii remains the best-selling game in the series, and despite being over a decade old, players are still discovering new secrets hidden deep inside its 32 courses. Just last week, three new shortcuts were discovered, continuing the race to try and find one for every course in the game.

Prior to July 11, there were only 18 known Ultra Shortcuts in Mario Kart Wii. While the game is full of all sorts of shortcuts, Ultra Shortcuts are defined by speedrunners as glitches that allow players to skip more than 50 percent of a lap. While Ultra Shortcuts aren’t unique to Mario Kart Wii, it has by far the most of them out of any game in the series. New ones are still discovered occasionally—two others were found earlier this year—but the discovery of three new ones within 24 hours is unheard of. FlaminFunky, a Mario Kart Wii enthusiast, recently documented how the new Ultra Shortcuts work on YouTube. All the new shortcuts were found in tool-assisted speedruns (TAS).

The first is on N64 Bowser’s Castle and was discovered by a player called speedrunner MKWLuke. It requires the player to move a little bit up the track at the beginning of the race before turning around and using their starting mushroom speed boosts to perform a rapid-fire hop into a rapid-fire hop ejection. A complex maneuver, it requires a pixel-perfect speedboost over the edge as Funky Kong pops a wheelie and is so precise it can only be completed using a TAS.

With this maneuver, it’s possible to clip off the right side of the track far enough into the back lava for the game to spawn the racer prior to the start of the race. The player then falls into the laval behind where they respawn to start even further back, at which point the game will register them as having moved forward rather than backward, counting the next time they cross the finish line as one completed lap.

The second, found by a player called Catfish, is on GBA Shy Guy Beach. It requires waiting three minutes for a bomb to drop just ahead of the finish line, making it viable only in the final lap. By turning around and speed boosting over top of it right before it explodes, it’s possible to get enough air and go far enough into the surrounding ocean to again trick the game into respawning the player behind the finish line. Moving across it then counts as a full lap.

The third Ultra Shortcut was discovered on Koopa Cape by BlazeMSX. This one also requires the combination of a rapid-fire hop and ejection, this time to clear the gap directly in front of the start of Koopa Cape while going in reverse. If they’re performed at the right time, it’s possible to clip into the side of the track directly behind the gap and ride through it until it gives way to a hidden waterfall. After dropping into the water, the game sends Lakitu to retrieve the player and respawn them back on the track, where crossing the finishing line will be registered as a completed lap.

Both the N64 Bowser’s Castle and Koopa Cape Ultra Shortcuts currently rely on glitches that can only be exploited using a TAS, but they do bring the game that much closer to the holy grail of every course having some sort of major skip inside of it.

“I think that the speedrunners and TAS programmers continue to stick with this game because Mario Kart Wii is a game that is unlike all the rest,” FlaminFunky told Kotaku in an email. “The unique mechanics and crazy glitches are a trait of Mario Kart Wii that’s mostly unique [among] Mario Kart games (although Mario Kart 64 can be similar at times) and it drives them to create and achieve new things over 11 years after the game came out.”

According to FlaminFunky, one of the next likeliest candidates for a shortcut breakthrough is GBA Bowser’s Castle. A player by the name of TAS Snoop discovered a skip for the first checkpoint on that track, leading other players to search for others that could be exploited to make a 15-second lap possible, at least for computers. Even if humans can’t pull it off, though, it’ll bring the game closer to its ultimate destiny in the eyes of some of its most hardcore players.

Source: Kotaku.com

The History Of Rainbow Road Speedrunning Is Filled With Bugs, Shortcuts, And Rivalries

The various Rainbow Road tracks that have appeared in every Mario Kart game are some of the most famous tracks in the entire franchise. They each are unique in their own ways and have attracted a large number of talented speedrunners, all hoping to set the fastest time. YouTuber Summoning Salt has put together a wonderfully detailed documentary going over each version of Rainbow Road and how different speedruns strategies and rivalries formed and changed over the years.

Since 1992, hundreds of speedrunners have set faster and faster times using their skill and a combination of various techniques, bugs, and shortcuts. And or each version of the famous and colorful track players needed to figure out new ways to shave seconds and milliseconds off their records.

For example, one of the most popular Mario Kart games, Mario Kart 64, is surrounded by rails. To find shortcuts and score faster times, players had to figure out points in the track where perfectly timed boosts and turns could allow them to leap over the guardrails and onto different parts of the track. One of the most famous skips on this version of Rainbow Road is known as the “Spiral Jump” and can shave off 10 seconds off your final time.

In one game players had to do some hardware modding. This happened in Super Mario Kart for the SNES, the first game in the series. Players found that the bottom of the D-Pad had small rubber nubs which prevented two directions being pressed at once. If these nubs were shaved down, players could boost in the game more effectively. This modification of the controller was considered fair and in fact, was seen as a way to level the playing field. The idea is that over time these nubs would naturally rub off, meaning some players might have an advantage over players using newer or lesser-used controllers. Though for purists there are leaderboards that track times completed using non-modded controllers.

In fact, nearly every version of Rainbow Road has multiple leaderboards, often splitting up runs that used shortcuts and runs that didn’t. Other leaderboards are split between country and version.

All of this and much more is covered in great detail in the full video by Summoning Salt. The entire video is over 45 minutes long, so grab some snacks and get comfortable.

Even if you don’t play Mario Kart, Summoning Salt does a great job adding tension and drama into some of the runs and really explaining things in a way players unfamiliar with speedrunning will understand.

Source: Kotaku.com