Tag Archives: art

The Art Of Borderlands 3

Fine Art[Fine Art](https://kotaku.com/c/fine-art) is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you’re in the business and have some art you’d like to share, [get in touch!](mailto:plunkett@kotaku.com)  

Borderlands 3 is out, so tonight I figured we’d take a look at a bunch of art that went into the game’s production.

Below you’ll find a cross-section of works from throughout development of the game, from the earliest sketches through to completed character art. And while it’s not everything from everyone involved, it’s a good showcase of stuff that’ll give Borderlands fans a cool look behind the scenes of where everything in the game came from.

You’ll find links to each artist’s portfolio in their names below.


Jens Claessens

Danny Gardner

Source: Kotaku.com

Blizzard, Please Put Link In Overwatch

While this animation video looks exactly like something Blizzard would release, as part of some dream Zelda x Overwatch crossover event for the upcoming Switch version, it’s amazingly/sadly just the work of some fans instead.

This is actually the third time I’ve posted about this design, imagining Link as a playable character in Overwatch. The first time was when we led with Jeremy Vitry’s original artwork for his Fine Art feature. The second was when Aaron Walker turned it into a 3D model.

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Now, though, in collaboration with Vitry, Walker and some other folks (Stéphane Vidélo and Philémon Belhomme), VFX artist Etienne Pov has turned the art into a full-blown animation, complete with special moves and Zelda-specific loot box opening.

Source: Kotaku.com

The Art Of Control

Fine Art[Fine Art](https://kotaku.com/c/fine-art) is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you’re in the business and have some art you’d like to share, [get in touch!](mailto:plunkett@kotaku.com)  

As someone who grew up in a city dominated by brutalist office and government buildings, I’ve got a real soft spot for Control’s art design, which we’re going to be showcasing in tonight’s Fine Art.

Below you’ll find a cross-section of some of the work that went into the game’s conception, production and marketing. It’s not everything from everyone involved in the project, but it’s enough to give you a good idea of where the ideas for the finished product came from.

You’ll find links to each artist’s portfolio in their names below.


Source: Kotaku.com

Off-World Palaeontology

Fine Art[Fine Art](https://kotaku.com/c/fine-art) is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you’re in the business and have some art you’d like to share, [get in touch!](mailto:plunkett@kotaku.com)  

Yury Ostapchuk is a concept artist from Ukraine who works at Plarium, the Vikings: War of Clans guys.

You can see more of Yury’s work at his ArtStation page.


Source: Kotaku.com

Gaming Hardware Artist Turns Nintendo Famicom Into A Retro Computer

Swedish designer and craftsman Love Hultén transforms existing gaming hardware into dreamlike pieces of functional retrofuturist art. His latest work, the FC-PVM, combines a Japanese Famicom console with a Sony Trinitron monitor to create a self-contained retro gaming system with an old school terminal vibe.

The FC-PVM is a Japanese NES in a box, with its own monitor and a pair of original controllers modded to have wireless functionality. It’s also much more than that. It’s what the Famicom might have looked like if the modern age that technology futurists imagined in the 1950s and 1960s had come to fruition.

Love’s designs are always as utilitarian as they are striking. The wireless controllers store inside the unit behind a removable panel when not in use. The power and reset buttons are a pair of keyboard-style switches topped with red keycaps. In this photo of the set, the teal color of the Japanese Rockman 5 cartridge complements the retro design. The top of the unit has several cartridge storage slots, integrating the quirky Japanese cartridge colors into the design.

The FC-PVM is a piece of custom hardware that my fingers ache to touch. I want to place it in a room with corn-colored wallpaper and brown shag carpet and play with it while sitting on the floor, my grandmother’s cigarette smoke hanging in the air. As it’s not for sale and my grandmother passed away when I was 17, the best I can do is watch Love fiddle with it on video.

Check out Love’s Instagram and website for more of his glorious retro tech creations.

Source: Kotaku.com

Look At This Gosh-Darn Pretty Gaming PC

All photos by Michael Fahey

If I wanted to, I could put together a gaming PC with many of the same parts as this desktop by boutique system builder CLX, but I could never make it look as good. From the striking patterned pink outer shell to the gleefully glowing innards, CLX knows how to make a gaming rig look amazing.

CLX is the gaming division of Cybertron PC, a Kansas-based company that’s been putting together PCs since 1997. I first encountered the company back in 2016, when I reviewed one of its smaller systems, the “Scarab.” Though much smaller and lighter than the full-sized “Ra” model I recently tested, the Scarab packed a whole lot of power and a great deal of Egyptian-themed pretty into a compact package.

In the three years since I reviewed the Scarab, Cybertron PC has strengthened its CLX gaming brand, distancing it from the endless Transformers jokes that plagued early reviews (mine especially). When I see CLX at a trade show or gaming convention these days, I immediately know that I am going to see something gorgeous.

Case in point, the massive glass-and-metal beast that occupied my desk for several weeks. Look at that reflective metallic finish on the Phanteks Evolv X chassis.

The custom paint job costs $300, with an additional $50 for the “Jasper” pattern. CLX took a $200 case with a nice tempered-glass side window and some nifty integrated RGB lighting and turned it into a $550 work of art.

See the green light peeking out from inside the system on the left side of the photo? Let’s take a closer look.

My goodness, that is pretty. Custom water cooling pipes. That gradient coolant reservoir. A total of seven internal fans. The four 8 GB DDR4 memory sticks glow. The heatsink covering the Intel Core i9-9900K CPU glows. The side-mounted Nvidia Geforce RTX 2080Ti graphics card glows. And all of the glow is customizable, with different colors and effects adjustable via remote control.

The only bad thing about the look of the CLX Ra here is that I sit with my computers to my left, so I don’t get to enjoy the light show while I am working and playing.

What I love about the CLX system, which runs around $3,300 as configured and decorated, is that its internals are almost the same as the personal PC I use for work every day. Same CPU, same video card. The CLX system has 32 GB of RAM to my 16 GB, but otherwise, it’s not far off. It’s a powerful computer capable of running all the games at 4K with all of the ray-tracing everybody keeps going on about.

It performs nearly identically to my personal system, but it does so with grace and style far beyond that of my home-built PC with its relatively utilitarian NZXT H510 case. Where my system is a mess of wires, the CLX system is a series of internet-like tubes. While I haven’t figured out how to hook up all the RGB-lighted things I gathered for my personal system, CLX’s Ra is completely tricked out. My fans rattle slightly. The Ra has seven fans and is whisper quiet, aside from the occasional pleasant trickling sound of its coolant circulating.

The CLX system is so gorgeous that I didn’t even notice I forgot to take out a bit of the foam the company packed inside the system for shipping. Did you notice?

Yes, even with one of its case fans not spinning at all because some dork didn’t remove a bit of packing foam, the CLX Ra performed like a champ the entire time I had it, and looked gorgeous while doing so.

Source: Kotaku.com

Knock Knock, It’s The God Of War

Fine Art[Fine Art](https://kotaku.com/c/fine-art) is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you’re in the business and have some art you’d like to share, [get in touch!](mailto:plunkett@kotaku.com)  

Jin Kim is a concept artist who has worked on games like the most recent God of War.

You can see more of Kim’s stuff at his ArtStation page.


Source: Kotaku.com

The Kids Are Alright

Fine Art[Fine Art](https://kotaku.com/c/fine-art) is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you’re in the business and have some art you’d like to share, [get in touch!](mailto:plunkett@kotaku.com)  

Darren Bartley is a concept artist based in the UK working in the video game business.

Below you’ll see a ton of art from Tribal, an original IP Bartley has been dreaming up in his spare time.

You can see more of Bartley’s stuff at his ArtStation page.


Source: Kotaku.com

On The Road

Fine Art[Fine Art](https://kotaku.com/c/fine-art) is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you’re in the business and have some art you’d like to share, [get in touch!](mailto:plunkett@kotaku.com)  

Xi Zhang is an illustrator and concept artist from China.

You can see more Zhang’s stuff at their ArtStation page and Instagram.


Source: Kotaku.com

Fallen Angel

Fine Art[Fine Art](https://kotaku.com/c/fine-art) is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you’re in the business and have some art you’d like to share, [get in touch!](mailto:plunkett@kotaku.com)  

Yakun Wang is a character artist and illustrator at Tencent Games.

You can see more of Wang’s work at her ArtStation page.

UPDATE: Some artwork removed at artist’s request.


Source: Kotaku.com