Tag Archives: consoles

Sony to skip E3 2020

Sony PlayStation has announced that they will not be attending E3 2020.

This marks Sony’s second year of skipping E3, after deciding to not be at the event in 2019 as well.

This year marks a big year for gaming with the launch of PlayStation 5 from Sony and the Xbox Series X from Microsoft. It’s interesting that the company has decided to skip E3 with the launch of their new console this year, but it may show that E3 is starting to wind down in favor of hosting events on their own for their fans.

Sony announced the news in a press statement to outlets this afternoon.

After thorough evaluation SIE has decided not to participate in E3 2020,” said a Sony Interactive Entertainment spokesperson. “We have great respect for the ESA as an organization, but we do not feel the vision of E3 2020 is the right venue for what we are focused on this year.

“We will build upon our global events strategy in 2020 by participating in hundreds of consumer events across the globe. Our focus is on making sure fans feel part of the PlayStation family and have access to play their favorite content. We have a fantastic line up of titles coming to PlayStation 4, and with the upcoming launch of PlayStation 5, we are truly looking forward to a year of celebration with our fans.”

The PlayStation 5 is set to launch in Holiday 2020. Activision Publishing is still partnered with Sony for marketing for Call of Duty, and that marketing deal may continue for PS5, but that is yet to be seen.

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Source: CharlieIntel.com

PlayStation 5 logo revealed

Sony has revealed a first look a the PlayStation 5’s official logo during the Sony CES Press Conference in Las Vegas, NV at CES.

The company only revealed the logo for the PlayStation 5.

PlayStation CEO Jim Ryan also re-highlighted the hardware features of the PlayStation 5.

PlayStation confirmed more information to come in the months ahead of the PS5 launch. The console will launch in Holiday 2020.

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Source: CharlieIntel.com

Update – Not Real | First 360 degree look at Xbox Series X shown at AMD CES Conference

UPDATE: Microsoft has issued a statement saying AMD did not have an official 3D render of the Xbox Series X, but instead sourced a fan made one for their promo video.

Here’s Microsoft’s statement:

Someone at AMD made a big mistake…

Original Story:

AMD hosted their annual press conference highlighting what’s coming from them in 2020 during the CES Show in Las Vegas.

As part of the conference, their video had a brief 360 degree look at the all new Xbox Series X console, which revealed the back of the console including the ports. The back features two USB C ports and two HDMI ports, first spotted by Polygon.

The new Xbox Series X is set to launch in Holiday 2020. The console was first announced back during The Game Awards in December. Xbox has not announced a price for the new console yet.

Xbox’s Head Phil Spencer also updated his social picture to a picture of the processor of the Xbox Series X.

We’ll keep you updated on all things Xbox Series X.

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Source: CharlieIntel.com

What We’re Looking Forward To in 2020

2019 and the decade is coming to an end here shortly. Charlie Intel started up in the early part of this decade, back in 2011 with Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. 8.5 years later, nine Call of Duty games covered, we’re at the end of this decade.

On Friday, we posed a question on Twitter: what was your favorite Call of Duty game of the decade? The question was so popular it trended on Twitter, and the resounding answer was Black Ops 2 – as that trended worldwide following our question.

Now, with the end of the decade almost here, we wanted to put together a post on what we’re looking forward to going into 2020 – from Call of Duty to consoles and more. Due note, some of the stuff we’re speculating are rumors (and will be noted as such!).

Without further ado, let’s get into what we’re looking forward to in 2020.

Next-Generation Consoles

2020 will be another big year for consoles. The new PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X will both be arriving in Holiday 2020. The PlayStation 4 and Xbox One both launched in 2013; so seven years later, we’re getting a new generation of consoles – just in time for the start of the new decade.

PlayStation 5

The next PlayStation console will be arriving in Holiday 2020. Sony has thus far announced just a few details on the new console, including first details on the console’s specs and the controller.

If you missed it, here’s quick recap of the console details:

  • Backwards Compatible with PS4 games
  • Still using Physical Media
  • 8 Core AMD Processor
  • Radeon Navi GPU (Supports up to 8K resolution)
  • SSD and More Storage (Spider-Man loads times from 15 seconds to 0.8)
  • Raytracing

And here’s what’s known about the new DUALSHOCK controller for PS5:

  • New PS5 Controller uses USB Type C
  • PS5 Controller has Haptic Feedback
  • Controller has now adaptive triggers
  • New Speaker system on the controller
  • Better Battery Life
  • Heavier than the DUALSHOCK 4, but will be lighter than a Xbox One controller

There’s a lot more information to come in 2020 as PS5 launch approaches. We’ll be closely looking to see how Sony positions the PlayStation 5 for 2020 and the launch price for the console.

Xbox Series X

Microsoft first announced that a new generation of Xbox would be coming during E3 2019, where the company announced that the new generation is “Project Scarlet.” The told fans it would be a top of the line console with advanced specs and more.

The company then surprised everyone by announcing and revealing the look of the console at the 2019 Game Awards in mid-December. The console is called the Xbox Series X, as shown above, and is launching Holiday 2020.

If you missed any details, here’s a high level recap:

From a technical standpoint, this will manifest as world-class visuals in 4K at 60FPS, with possibility of up to 120FPS, including support for Variable Refresh Rate (VRR), and 8K capability. Powered by our custom-designed processor leveraging the latest Zen 2 and next generation RDNA architecture from our partners at AMD, Xbox Series X will deliver hardware accelerated ray tracing and a new level of performance never before seen in a console.  Additionally, our patented Variable Rate Shading (VRS) technology will allow developers to get even more out of the Xbox Series X GPU and our next-generation SSD will virtually eliminate load times and bring players into their gaming worlds faster than ever before.

We are minimizing latency by leveraging technology such as Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) and giving developers new functionality like Dynamic Latency Input (DLI) to make Xbox Series X the most responsive console ever.  Xbox Series X is also designed for a future in the cloud, with unique capabilities built into the hardware and software to make it as easy as possible to bring great games to both console and elsewhere. Xbox Series X will deliver a level of fidelity and immersion unlike anything that’s been achieved in previous console generations. 

Call of Duty

Modern Warfare Content

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare launched on October 25, 2019 with mixed reaction from the Call of Duty community.

Activision revealed recently that Modern Warfare is the most played Call of Duty game of the last six years, despite a lot of the negativity online about the game. It seems more of the casual players are playing Modern Warfare a lot while some of the long term fans are frustrated with some of the design choices.

2020 is looking strong for the game with more Post Launch content seasons for Modern Warfare with new Battle Passes, maps, and more. With the elimination of the Season Pass in this game, it’s great knowing all players will receive all of the new maps to come for free. We hope to see more Modern Warfare classic makes into this game, like Rust, Terminal, and more.

There’s so many options to pick from – let’s hope Infinity Ward picks the right ones…

Call of Duty: Mobile

Call of Duty: Mobile debuted in 2019 as one of the new ways Activision can bring Call of Duty to more users worldwide. Call of Duty: Mobile has been a hit for Activision, racking in millions in revenue and becoming the most downloaded new mobile game in history.

In 2020, we’re looking forward to seeing how Activision evolves the Call of Duty: Mobile game with more content and new features. They’ve added in the Zombies mode and promised more Zombies maps, new MP maps, and more to come to the game as the year progresses.

We’re also interested to see if they plan to bring any of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare’s maps and content to the mobile game. The mobile game has brought Call of Duty to a new audience – especially in Asia, where in some regions home consoles are not as popular.

Rumor: Modern Warfare Battle Royale

Another thing we’re also hoping and waiting to see pan out in 2020 is this long rumored Battle Royale mode for Call of Duty: Modern Warfare.

Activision has not officially confirmed a Battle Royale exists, but there has been so many rumors about its release.

The rumors state that the Battle Royale is expected to be free to play, standalone from the main Modern Warfare game, and release in “early 2020.” Rumors also state that Raven Software is tasked with leading development of this project. The studio was recently hiring a Community Manager for the studio, in a sign that they are becoming lead in some regard for Call of Duty.

Even beyond the rumors, so many details on this potential BR have been found in the game files for Modern Warfare, including a look at the in-development map for the mode.

Here’s that leaked map, in case you missed it:

Fans have even glitched in-game to be above the entire Battle Royale map inside of Modern Warfare.

With all of the rumors, the numerous in-game references, and more, we’re patiently waiting to see if this ever pans out. And if it does, it would be remarkable. Free to play Call of Duty BR? That would be a major hit for Activision.

But for now, it’s just a rumor.

Speculation: Call of Duty 2020

Every year, a new Call of Duty game releases, and 2020 will of course be no different.

But 2020 will be different in regards to the release cycle. Since 2013, Call of Duty devs have been on a 3 year development cycle rotating between Treyarch, Infinity Ward, and Sledgehammer Games.

But in May of 2019, Kotaku reported that Activision put Treyarch in charge of 2020 Call of Duty game because of bickering between SHG and Raven. Treyarch even slipped up a bit with a job listing earlier saying they’re working on a “next-gen title for 2020.” This makes Sledgehammer and Raven support studios with Treyarch.

2020 will be the first two-year developed Treyarch title since 2012’s Call of Duty: Black Ops 2, which is now a beloved game. It will be interesting to see the direction Treyarch goes with developing a new game in two years, and with that, a new game for new consoles. This will be Treyarch’s first as the leading dev for a new console launch for Call of Duty. 2013 was Infinity Ward with Call of Duty: Ghosts.

The rumors floating around are that the 2020 game from Treyarch encompasses the Cold War era, including the Vietnam War. There is a campaign expected to be part of the game.

With all of this to look forward too, 2020 is looking to be a busy year! As always, stick with CharlieIntel for the latest on all things Call of Duty and new generation consoles.

We hope everyone has a safe and happy new year!

The post What We’re Looking Forward To in 2020 appeared first on Charlie INTEL.

Source: CharlieIntel.com

PlayStation launches new Back Button Attachment for PS4 DualShock 4 controller

Sony PlayStation has announced a new attachment for the PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller: the Back Button Attachment.

This Back Button Attachment allows you to have two extra buttons on the back that can be programmed to any of the front facing functions, allowing you to have easier access to select functions with via the back of the controller.

  • Responsive Back Buttons and High-fidelity OLED Screen: The two back buttons can map up to 16 different actions such as triangle, circle, R1 and R2 to name a few and provide amazing tactile feedback, so you can jump and slide without missing a beat. The attachment also features an integrated OLED display that provides real time information around button assignments.
  • Highly Configurable: A dedicated button allows you to remap back button inputs on the fly, so you are always prepared no matter what game you’re playing. Furthermore, you can save and choose up to three different profiles for use in various games and there is also a headset pass-through for connecting any 3.5mm wired headset to the controller.
  • Developed by PlayStation: The product is tested and approved for all of your favorite PlayStation 4 and PlayStation VR titles, and is built with the ergonomics of the DS4 in mind.

The new Back Button Attachment is available starting January 23 for $29.99.

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Source: CharlieIntel.com

The next generation Xbox revealed: Xbox Series X

Microsoft took the stage at the 2019 The Game Awards to announce their next generation Xbox: Xbox Series X.

Xbox Series X will be our fastest, most powerful console ever and set a new bar for performance, speed and compatibility, allowing you to bring your gaming legacy, thousands of games from three generations and more forward with you. Its industrial design enables us to deliver four times the processing power of Xbox One X in the most quiet and efficient way, something that is critically important in delivering truly immersive gameplay. We also designed Xbox Series X to support both vertical and horizontal orientation. It’s bold and unique, very much like our fans around the world and the team of collaborators and innovators who built it.

It is described as the fastest and most powerful Xbox yet, and will lead Xbox into the next generation.

Microsoft detailed some of the specs in a Xbox Wire post:

From a technical standpoint, this will manifest as world-class visuals in 4K at 60FPS, with possibility of up to 120FPS, including support for Variable Refresh Rate (VRR), and 8K capability. Powered by our custom-designed processor leveraging the latest Zen 2 and next generation RDNA architecture from our partners at AMD, Xbox Series X will deliver hardware accelerated ray tracing and a new level of performance never before seen in a console.  Additionally, our patented Variable Rate Shading (VRS) technology will allow developers to get even more out of the Xbox Series X GPU and our next-generation SSD will virtually eliminate load times and bring players into their gaming worlds faster than ever before.

We are minimizing latency by leveraging technology such as Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) and giving developers new functionality like Dynamic Latency Input (DLI) to make Xbox Series X the most responsive console ever.  Xbox Series X is also designed for a future in the cloud, with unique capabilities built into the hardware and software to make it as easy as possible to bring great games to both console and elsewhere. Xbox Series X will deliver a level of fidelity and immersion unlike anything that’s been achieved in previous console generations. 

The new console will launch in Holiday 2020.

Here’s the reveal trailer:

The Xbox Series X will go head to head against PlayStation’s new PS5 console, which launches in Holiday 2020 as well.

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Source: CharlieIntel.com

Potential first look at PlayStation 5 Controller revealed via patent filing

A potential first look at the new PlayStation 5 controller may have been revealed through a Sony PlayStation patent filing in Japan, noticed by ViedoGameChronicles.

The new filing showcases a controller that overall looks similar to the current DualShock 4 design, but has no light bar, amongst other fine tuned adjustments.

A few weeks back, Sony announced some new details on the PlayStation 5 controller including its new adaptive triggers and speaker system.

  • New PS5 Controller uses USB Type C
  • PS5 Controller has Haptic Feedback
  • Controller has now adaptive triggers
  • New Speaker system on the controller
  • Better Battery Life
  • Heavier than the DUALSHOCK 4, but will be lighter than a Xbox One controller

Another image from forum ResetEra compares the new patent filing to that of the PlayStation 4 controller.

The PlayStation 5 is expected to launch in Holiday 2020 and Sony says more details on the console and games to come in the months ahead.

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Source: CharlieIntel.com

PlayStation 5 announced: New Controller, Updated UI, Holiday 2020 Launch

PlayStation has announced that the next PlayStation console is officially called the PlayStation 5, as everyone expected.

The company announced that the new console will be releasing in Holiday 2020 in a new blog post, alongside providing new details on some features of the console on WIRED Magazine.

The PlayStation Blog shares the big highlights on what to expect from the PlayStation 5, including two new innovation features coming to the new console’s all new controller.

The preview of the next controller includes new details on how it works, including:

  • New PS5 Controller uses USB Type C
  • PS5 Controller has Haptic Feedback
  • Controller has now adaptive triggers
  • New Speaker system on the controller
  • Better Battery Life
  • Heavier than the DUALSHOCK 4, but will be lighter than a Xbox One controller

In the WIRED Magazine article, Sony also stated that with the new changes for the PS5, players will be able to choose which parts of the games they want to install. This means you can just install the campaign or just the MP mode. If you download the entire game, you will be able to remove the parts you don’t want to play anymore.

“Rather than treating games like a big block of data,” Cerny says, “we’re allowing finer-grained access to the data.” That could mean the ability to install just a game’s multiplayer, leaving the single-player campaign for another time, or just installing the whole thing and then deleting the single-player campaign once you’ve finished it.

In addition, the PS5 will support a revamped UI that will allow users to see what parts of the game has been updated versus having to constantly boot up the entire game to check what’s new.

“Even though it will be fairly fast to boot games, we don’t want the player to have to boot the game, see what’s up, boot the game, see what’s up,” Cerny says. “Multiplayer game servers will provide the console with the set of joinable activities in real time. Single-player games will provide information like what missions you could do and what rewards you might receive for completing them—and all of those choices will be visible in the UI. As a player you just jump right into whatever you like.”

Here’s the description from the PlayStation Blog:

The “more” refers to something I’m quite excited about – a preview of the new controller that will ship with PlayStation 5. One of our goals with the next generation is to deepen the feeling of immersion when you play games, and we had the opportunity with our new controller to reimagine how the sense of touch can add to that immersion.

To that end, there are two key innovations with the PlayStation 5’s new controller. First, we’re adopting haptic feedback to replace the “rumble” technology found in controllers since the 5th generation of consoles. With haptics, you truly feel a broader range of feedback, so crashing into a wall in a race car feels much different than making a tackle on the football field. You can even get a sense for a variety of textures when running through fields of grass or plodding through mud.

The second innovation is something we call adaptive triggers, which have been incorporated into the trigger buttons (L2/R2). Developers can program the resistance of the triggers so that you feel the tactile sensation of drawing a bow and arrow or accelerating an off-road vehicle through rocky terrain. In combination with the haptics, this can produce a powerful experience that better simulates various actions. Game creators have started to receive early versions of the new controller, and we can’t wait to see where their imagination goes with these new features at their disposal.

SOURCE: PlayStation

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I Miss Simple Video Games That Didn’t Try Too Hard

Photo: Andrew Liszewski (Gizmodo)

As someone obsessed with handheld gaming consoles, Nintendo’s Switch should have been the ultimate portable system for me. Instead, it actually made me nostalgic for Tiger Electronics’ LCD handhelds; arguably some of the first true portable video game systems. They were cheap, durable, simple, and addictive, and 30 years later I find myself missing that experience.

I don’t have a lot of free time to devout to playing and finishing games these days. I’ll occasionally have a few minutes of boredom I’m looking to kill, but I don’t think I could even load Breath of the Wild in that amount of time. That’s where the cheap LCD games of the late ‘80s and ‘90s excelled. They were bite-size snippets of action with a goal that was rarely more involved than registering a new high score. They required no serious commitment and there were no tutorials to slog through. You could easily hop in into a game in a couple of seconds, enjoy a few minutes of satisfying button mashing, and then quickly stash them away until you needed to feed your gaming addiction again—minus the side effects of losing hours of your life or blowing your budget.

Founded by Arnold, Gerald, and Randy Rissman in 1978, Tiger Electronics got its start making simple electronics like phonographs, but transitioned to interactive toys and LCD-based gaming devices in the early ‘80s. For a while the company’s most notable product was a series of portable game devices based on Universal’s 1976 King Kong remake featuring a knock-off version of Nintendo’s Donkey Kong. It led to a legal dustup between Universal and Nintendo over who owned the rights to giant apes, which Nintendo eventually won, but ultimately decided not to take down Tiger Electronics in the process.

A few years after the Kong controversy blew over, Tiger Electronics settled on a design for a series of electronic handheld games that the company would eventually sell millions of in the late ‘80s and ‘90s. The first games in Tiger’s new lineup, released in 1987, were sports titles like football, skeet shooting, and baseball, which also happened to be the first Tiger handheld I ever owned.

Before Tiger’s new line, portable gaming systems always came with a premium price tag. I can remember drooling over mini tabletop arcades in catalogs, but never actually putting them on my Christmas or birthday wish lists for fear of maxing out what my parents were willing to spend. Even Nintendo’s Game & Watch handhelds were on the pricy side, but in 1987 Tiger Electronics changed that. Its new handhelds featured a gratuitous use of plastic—from the housings, to the buttons, to even the display covers—and simple segmented LCD screens, barely a couple of inches in size, that could only display a limited and crude collection of graphics and animations. If there was such a thing as disposable video games, Tiger’s handhelds came close to being that.

Gameplay is almost an eyesore now, but I can’t even begin to count the number of hours I’ve stared at that tiny screen.
GIF: Andrew Liszewski (Gizmodo)

Gameplay was equally basic. Tiger’s Electronic Baseball played more like an enhanced home run derby where the player’s team never actually takes the field. Just two buttons were used to swing at every pitch and then strategically advance your players from base to base—with “strategically” being used very generously here.

But the 10-year-old version of me didn’t care, he absolutely loved this game, bringing it on long road trips and even smuggling it into Sunday school every week. I also didn’t care that Bases Loaded on the NES was a vastly superior experience; Tiger’s version could come with me anywhere, I didn’t have to take turns playing with my siblings, and I didn’t have to wait until my parents were done watching something on TV. Playing it today I rarely get past a couple of innings before losing interest, but the simplicity is exactly why I still keep games like these in easy reach, and keep coming back. They scratch an itch without destroying my productivity.

All the corner cutting also meant that Tiger Electronic’s handhelds were usually around $20 each, easily accommodating the budgets of most 10-year-olds reliant on allowances or birthday money for income. The plastic still feels cheap and my baseball game is covered in scratches and scars from being endlessly dropped and rage-thrown, but it’s one of my few childhood electronic toys that still works fine 30 years later. Tiger had found the perfect balance between price, durability, and addictiveness to hook a generation.

It also helped that the company was almost obsessive about licensing popular properties like movies, video games, and even TV shows. Unlike a console game these handhelds didn’t require months of complicated development. Tiger could churn these games out quickly, and it did just that. Mortal Kombat, Jurassic Park, Star Wars, GI Joe, Captain Planet, Full House, The Little Mermaid—if something was pop culturally relevant in the ‘90s, there’s a good chance there was a Tiger Electronics handheld game made for it.

So why isn’t Tiger Electronics a dominant name in gaming today? The brand is definitely still around, now owned by Hasbro, but the clock started ticking on the company’s cheap and simple approach to handheld gaming on April 21, 1989, when Nintendo’s Game Boy was released. It was more expensive than Tiger’s handhelds, but every game offered unique gameplay, graphics, and sound, and game carts could often be found competitively priced. Tiger eventually released its own cartridge based system in 1997, the Game.com, that included online connectivity and a touchscreen, but the Game Boy Color arrived soon after, and Tiger Electronics simply wasn’t big enough to take on Nintendo any more.

I’m not going to pretend like I still turn to Electronic Baseball for all my gaming needs, the Switch is definitely my goto console now. But despite being portable, I’m hesitant to travel with it for fear of damaging or losing $300 worth of gear. It also doesn’t really provide instant gratification, and more often than not as an adult that’s what I’m looking for. Smartphone games come close to filling that need, but sometimes I just want to mindlessly mash buttons for a couple of minutes, hitting home runs or beating up baddies, without having to worry about killing my phone’s battery, waiting for app updates, or all the other distractions of modern gaming. Tiger Electronics game me exactly that 30 years ago.

Source: Kotaku.com

Sony, Nintendo, and Microsoft will require publishers to disclose the odds of earning items in loot boxes

Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo have committed to the Entertainment Software Association (ESA) that they will soon require publishers who publish games on their platforms to disclose the odds of earning items in loot boxes for new games and updates that add loot boxes to their games.

The news comes from the Entertainment Software Association chief counsel of tech policy Michael Warnecke, who is currently talking at Federal Trade Commission’s Inside the Game workshop.

“That said, we are doing more,” Warnecke said. “I’m pleased to announce this morning that Microsoft, Nintendo, and Sony have indicated to ESA a commitment to new platform policies with respect to the use of paid loot boxes in games that are developed for their platform. Specifically, this would apply to new games and game updates that add loot box features. And it would require the disclosure of the relative rarity or probabilities of obtaining randomized virtual items in games that are available on their platforms.

The ESA also noted as part of their statement at the Workshop that many leading publishers have agreed to also disclose the odds themselves to allow more information to be shared with the consumers.

“As well, many of the leading video game publishers of the Entertainment Software Association have decided that they are going to implement a similar approach at the publisher level to provide consumers this information and give them enhanced information to make purchase decisions.”

The ESA has maintained their stance that loot boxes should not be considered gambling. The association has said for months that they disagree with the Senators notion that loot boxes should be banned or considered gambling as players earn items regardless of purchasing it or not.

The ESA, alongside the ESRB, has updated their ratings system in the US to note which games have in-game DLC with a new “In-Game Purchases” tag on the back of the box for each of the products.

Senators in the US have been calling for hearings and investigations to understand the effect that loot boxes have on children. Thus far, no major action has been taken in the US on this issue.

SOURCE: GameIndustry

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