Tag Archives: cosplay

Blackface Controversy Splits Cosplay Scene Over League Of Legends Outfit

For the upcoming EuroCosplay Championships, taking place in London later this month, French cosplayer Livanart decided to create an elaborate costume based on Pyke from League of Legends. Livanart is a white French woman, while Pyke is “a black guy from Bilgewater.

Livanart had obviously worked on the outfit for a long time (she even won the French Cosplay Cup earlier this year with it), and had impressed judges enough that she was selected as one of 25 finalists for the competition. Yet last week, with the championships only two weeks away, Livanart was told by organizers that, following complaints, her cosplay would not not be allowed to participate.

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Those concerns were based on the fact some saw her cosplay as an example of blackface, given her skin color vs that of the character she was portraying. While she hasn’t been banned from the competition—organizers say they are “currently looking into alternative options that allow [her] to still compete”—the timing of the decision has had largely the same effect, since it’s too late to create another costume with that much work involved.

Had Livanart simply painted her skin black, she wouldn’t have made the finals of the competition and we wouldn’t be having this discussion. The timing of Livanart’s sanction, however, coupled with the nature of the cosplay and its prominence as part of a big contest, has led to a more complicated situation, one that has split opinions in the cosplay community.

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While Livanart is dressed as a black character with black skin, she hasn’t applied make-up or paint; her transformation into Pyke is achieved through the wearing of a prosthetic suit. Critics see this as a loophole and believe that the same intent as blackface—to alter your skin color to match that of a black person, a practice with a terrible past—is still present in the cosplay.

Some close-up shots of the “skin” made for Livanart’s Pyke cosplay | Photo by Livanart Cosplay

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Those rushing to Livanart’s defense, meanwhile, say that because her suit is a faithful recreation of the character’s likeness, it’s an act of tribute, not caricature. They also argue that because it’s a suit it’s not blackface, and that as the popular cosplay refrain goes, everyone should be free to cosplay as whoever they want, regardless of the color of their skin (even if this is a distortion of that call’s original intent, which was to encourage people of color to cosplay as white characters without having to face constant racist abuse).

In support of Livanart’s position, another finalist, JustJay from the Czech Republic, has withdrawn from the competition.

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The whole thing has been one giant mess, from the response by European cosplayers and fans unfamiliar with blackface’s nuance and unwilling to listen to other’s views on the subject—Livanart herself says in this Facebook video that she spoke with “some black people” while making the suit, heard their concerns then went and did it anyway—to the organizer’s timing causing this to become news in the first place.

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At least EuroCosplay is now looking at ways to avoid this in the future, by being more explicit in spelling out the rules of entry into the contest.

Source: Kotaku.com

There Are Now Sonic Movie Halloween Costumes And No One Is Ready

You ever spot a really bad idea and think, “that’s definitely going to have consequences that no one can foresee”? To me, that’s the Sonic the Hedgehog movie. Not because of its questionable design choices (give me the weird hog, it’s good, actually) but because no matter how great Sonic’s movie design is, Halloween was always coming. And when Halloween rolls around, so do horrifying costumes that barely resemble the things they are based on.

Consider with me Party City’s children’s Sonic costume. Since it is in fact based on the film—which would have been out this year were it not for a last-minute hedgehog makeover—we have a onesie adorned with a weird fur pattern and floppy hood spikes. It is good, perhaps, if you would like to dress up your progeny as sonic, the meme, and not Sonic, the mascot. Get it for your child, and you will quickly become sorry for all the days they wear it that are not Halloween.

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Then there’s this fucking nightmare.

The less said here, the better, but there’s a reason that after years and years of memes and goofballs in blue tights, most have taken to wearing Sonic hoods, not Sonic masks. You’re courting chaos, the way Nic Cage did when he said he’d like to take John Travolta’s “face…..off.”

None of us are ready for these to hit the streets, let alone the Sonic the Hedgehog film, which I now suspect has been delayed strictly to avoid association with any of this stuff.

Source: Kotaku.com

The Inevitable Cosplay Of Overwatch’s Mei Supporting Hong Kong

Yesterday, when Kotaku reported that Overwatch’s Mei had been turned into a symbol of the Hong Kong resistance, one commenter wondered if there would be cosplay of this at next month’s BlizzCon. Probably! But we don’t have to wait that long.

Redditor Zephronica uploaded these photos to r/HongKong of what has to be the first cosplay of Mei supporting the Hong Kong resistance.

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Initially, Zephronica thought about burning the costume. “After the whole Blizzard fiasco, there was no way I could wear this cosplay in good conscience anymore, so I thought about showing displeasure by burning this cosplay,” the cosplayer wrote. “Though after seeing all the memes of Hong Kong Mei, I’ve decided that this is a much better choice.”

If you are wondering why there’s a maple leaf on the protest sign, Zephronica is supporting the protesters all the way from Canada.

BlizzCon will be held November 1 and 2. Expect Mei cosplay and support for Hong Kong.

Source: Kotaku.com

It Took 12 People To Make This Giant Monster Hunter Cosplay

Cosplay ShowcaseKotaku’s Cosplay Showcase is a feature that highlights the unique work of cosplayers, artists and photographers as they seek to tell new stories and push the boundaries of the craft.  

This enormous Grammeowster Chef is so big, and so detailed, that it took two studios—GSTQ Fashions (who we covered recently for their work on Dave Bautista’s final WWE outfit) and Wooden Leg Studios—to bring it to life.

The cosplay was commissioned by Capcom for the company’s Monster Hunter display at PAX West, and stands over 6.5 feet tall.

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Legend of Micah shot this behind-the-scenes video, which gives us a fantastic look at just how much planning, work, technology and craftsmanship goes into building this kind of top-tier cosplay.

And here are some shots showing the whole thing being made and put together:

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Source: Kotaku.com

Our Favorite Cosplay From Delta H 2019

Cosplay GalleryA showcase of some of the best photos and video from cosplay events around the world. Credits provided where possible, but if we’ve missed something [let us know and we can add](mailto:plunkett@kotaku.com)!  

Games and anime show Delta H was held in Houston from September 20-22 and featured guest appearances by basically the entire original (American) cast of Neon Genesis.

All photos and video were shot for Mineralblu by Jorge and Jordan.


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Source: Kotaku.com

Cosplayer Constructs Stunning Shield For Overwatch’s Brigitte

Cosplay ShowcaseKotaku’s Cosplay Showcase is a feature that highlights the unique work of cosplayers, artists and photographers as they seek to tell new stories and push the boundaries of the craft.  

Now that Overwatch players have stopped complaining about how overpowered the hero Brigitte is, perhaps we can all guiltlessly enjoy some fantastic Brigitte cosplay.

On Saturday, Melbourne, Australia-based cosplayer AltF4Cosplay posted her completed shield from Brigitte’s “Shieldmaiden” skin. Here’s what the shield looks like in-game:

And here is AltF4Cosplay’s brilliant shield. It even lights up:

Reached over Facebook messenger, AltF4Cosplay told Kotaku that the shield’s body is made of Acrylic plastic and its hexagon pattern was laser-etched. “I then removed a small circle in the center, behind where the armor would be, for the lights and power pack. The lighting system is an Arduino (a mini computer) and a rechargeable mobile phone battery pack, programmed to have the lights turn in and off in a circular pattern,” she said.

“A simple leather strap and metal handle was drilled into shield under the armor pieces to be able to carry it,” she said. “It was the funnest build I’ve ever done!”

Source: Kotaku.com

Twitch Suspends Streamer After She Wears Chun-Li Cosplay

Last night, Twitch suspended art streamer Quqco after she livestreamed herself wearing cosplay of Chun-Li from Street Fighter, Dexerto first reported.

Quqco is a small streamer who often draws pictures from her favorite gaming franchises live on Twitch. Yesterday, she was wearing Chun-Li’s signature blue qipao and bun covers, and soon after, she received notice of a three-day suspension for “sexually suggestive content or activities,” according to an email from Twitch posted to her Twitter. The outfit features a thigh-high slit that is sometimes considered risqué.

“I actually bought one size up to ensure that the slit wasn’t too high,” said Quqco in an email to Kotaku. “The slit of this dress is cut lower than some runner shorts I own.”

Twitch’s guidelines surrounding sexually explicit content are vague, a widespread allegation waged by female streamers for years. “Attire intended to be sexually suggestive and nudity are prohibited,” Twitch’s community guidelines read. For streams like Quqco’s, they “recommend attire appropriate for public settings, such as what you would wear on a public street, or to a mall or restaurant.” The video in question has since been removed, so it’s difficult to tell if there was a particular moment that may have been flagged by Twitch. Twitch did not respond to Kotaku’s request for comment by the time of publication.

Twitch previously suspended Quqco after she cosplayed Mai Shiranui from The King of Fighters. At the time, Quqco wrote on Twitter that she was banned because she was report brigaded by the popular subreddit Livestreamfail. “I was sexually harassed,” she wrote in a now-deleted tweet. “All I wore was a Mai cosplay while I was drawing.” Quqco believes this recent suspension was also due to “a group of trolls who have been targeting me for mass reporting for a while…I am immediately reported because I’ve been branded a thot,” she said, adding that she doesn’t do physical activities like squatting or dancing on stream.

Kotaku saw one now-removed comment on Livestreamfail in which a user said, “Lmao saw her streaming again today and instantly reported the thot,” although we were unable to confirm whether she was brigaded. Brigading is not an uncommon problem for female streamers; Kotaku has previously reported on self-appointed boob police who trawl through Twitch’s directories searching for and reporting women they believe are violating Twitch’s terms of service. Kotaku reached out to the moderators of Livestreamfail but did not receive an immediate response.

“I am sure there are other girls who are facing the same difficulty as me,” said Quqco. “The problem is that there are so many trolls and ill-tended people who will band together to report a streamer.”

Source: Kotaku.com

The Cosplay Of The 2019 Tokyo Game Show

Screenshot: Rescue the Princess! (YouTube)
Kotaku EastEast is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.  

This year’s Tokyo Game Show has come to a close. But these cosplay images will live on!

Cosplayers came out in droves during the show’s two public days. Those wanting photos must line up to take snaps, which means a good chunk of time needs to be dedicated to cosplay.

The highlight clip below was taken by Rescue the Princess! (follow on Twitter here):

Let’s have a look at some of this year’s standouts:

Source: Kotaku.com

Our Favorite Cosplay From DragonCon 2019, One Of America’s Oldest Nerd Shows

Cosplay GalleryA showcase of some of the best photos and video from cosplay events around the world. Credits provided where possible, but if we’ve missed something [let us know and we can add](mailto:plunkett@kotaku.com)!  

DragonCon has been running for over 30 years now, drawing tens of thousands of attendees to one of the oldest and best cons on the planet, the highlight of which is often the giant cosplay parade that weaves its way through downtown Atlanta.

This year’s show drew over 85,000 attendees, and ran from August 29-September 5. Mineralblu was there taking photos and video for us, and you can see it all below.

As usual, the cosplayers involved, the series and characters they’re cosplaying as and their social media handles are watermarked on the images.


Source: Kotaku.com

Metroid Cosplay Is Blowing Socks Off

Here’s Japanese cosplayer 11Vadu with one of, if not the best Samus outfit I have ever seen.

The accuracy, the movement, it’s incredible.

I think what I like best, though, is the material used for the bulk of the chestpiece. It’s…modular foam floor mats, cut and shaped, which you can see in this vid that doubles as a making-of, as well as a showcase of the suit’s lighting effects.

The first two vids, and the pics below, were all taken at the 2019 Toyama Cosplay Festival.

まことにこふ

Source: Kotaku.com