Tag Archives: dc entertainment

HBO’s Watchmen Wants to Dig into the Heart of American Racism…by Making You Like Cops

The first 15 minutes or so of Damon Lindelof’s Watchmen are some of the most agonizing moments of television this year. They squarely focus on the brutalization of multiple black Americans during the infamous Tulsa race riots—a day when mobs of crazed white people descended upon, attacked, and murdered black Oklahomans because they felt empowered to do so.

io9 had the opportunity to view the premiere episode of HBO’s Watchmen at New York Comic Con this past weekend. Here are our first impressions.

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The attack on Black Wall Street is a real event that Watchmen uses to link itself to our reality while also building out the larger fictional universe Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons first created in 1986—a universe that was specifically meant to exist within the vacuum of a finite number of comic books. Of course, DC Comics ended up having different plans for Watchmen, which has gone on to become one of the integral aspects of the publishers’ intellectual multiverse, which the HBO series is part of. Unlike Doomsday Clock, Lindelof’s Watchmen errs on the side of realism and its curious story set some 30 years after the events of the original comic isn’t particularly interested in the usual superheroic trappings that typically come with live-action comic book adaptations.

In this universe, the Watchmen were very much a thing, but the legacies they’ve all built have played out in ways you wouldn’t immediately imagine. Doctor Manhattan, Silk Spectre, Rorschach, and the Comedian are parts of the show, but not exactly as characters. They’re the atmosphere and context that new characters like Angela Abar (Regina King), Judd Crawford (Don Johnson), and Looking Glass (Tim Blake Nelson) exist in.

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Though the events of the original Watchmen comics play a significant role in the shaping of the series’ world—a place where the internet and cell phones don’t exist—they aren’t what the show is really about. Rorschach might have been a misunderstood antihero originally, but here his name and iconography have been co-opted by terror cells of white supremacists known as the Seventh Cavalry, who are coordinating a mysterious attack that’s meant to change the world as the series begins. In the show, Robert Redford has been the president for decades and ushered in an era of American liberalism complete with legislation meant to address the country’s history of anti-black racism and socio-political disenfranchisement. The pejoratively-referred to “Redford-ations” have made it so that the victims and descendants of racially-driven subjugation no longer have to pay taxes. Unsurprisingly, there are more than a few enraged white people—like the Seventh Cavalry—who hate that aspect of their society.

Years after being driven into dormancy by the police, the Seventh Cavalry begins operating once again in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Even though the police officers all wear masks, they quickly learn that the terrorists are more than capable of discerning their secret identities and targeting them in their off-duty lives. While the imagery of masked police officers is certainly arresting, it’s here the show begins to wander into messy and at times potentially irresponsible territory with the way it uses metaphors to explore very real problems plaguing society.

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Like all cops, King’s Abar is a woman who wears multiple hats. To the outside world, she’s a baker and something of a homemaker because the police still have to go to great lengths to ensure they aren’t targeted in their lives as private citizens. But she is one of the world’s watchmen who dresses up in an intimidating costume as part of her job taking on criminals who want nothing more than to hurt innocent people.

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King is captivating as Abar. But her performance can only do so much to distract you from the fact the Watchmen (at least in its first episode) frames white terrorists and cops as being diametrically-opposed groups that have no ideological overlap. Because this is a show that’s meant to explore aspects of American society, that framing just doesn’t work, or rather it doesn’t work if you’re actually trying to think your way through the multitude of things Watchmen is attempting to comment on.

Director Nicole Kassell does a wondrous job of immediately pulling you into this story and bowling you over with imagery that’s both beautiful and utterly devastating, and you can see why genre fans with HBO subscriptions are going to glom onto the show. But there are so many moments when Watchmen’s debut episode falls short of saying anything interesting or insightful about its subject matter, seemingly content to be a mirror of our society, albeit a seriously distorted one.

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There’s the reality—What if cops did drugs while on the job? What if kids of color got into trouble for calling out their racist peers?—and then the fantastical: What if we all lived in a world where squids periodically fell from the sky and we all just dealt with it because that’s how things are? Space squids aside, Watchmen presents numerous real-world scenarios ripe for commentary but it isn’t immediately apparent that the show feels the need to engage with the complexities of those scenarios.

The first episode isn’t going to encapsulate the entire series in a succinct way—that’s understandable—but at the same time, one doesn’t need to really spend much time making a definitive statement about whether morally sound people should feel empowered to fight fascists. We really don’t need more examinations of the police that aren’t honest about the organization’s own history of racially-driven terrorism. Watchmen should be more than that.

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In the end, the series could very well end up doing an excellent job of unpacking all of these things with the kind of care, grace, and honesty that the story (and audiences) deserve, but also, it may not. You can’t really get a definitive sense either way by the first episode’s end, which very much seems to be the creative team’s questionable intention.


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Source: Kotaku.com

Diana Takes on the Post-Apocalypse in Our Exclusive First Look at Wonder Woman: Dead Earth

A tired Diana awakens to a changed world in Wonder Woman: Dead Earth.
Image: Daniel Warren Johnson and Mike Spicer (DC Comics)

Wonder Woman has faced many trials and tribulations in her quest to save the world of man from itself. But what happens when Diana wakes from slumber to find man’s world already lost? Welcome to DC Comics’ new take on the Princess of the Amazons, Dead Earth.

io9 can exclusively reveal the first details on Black Label’s latest take on a DC icon in Wonder Woman: Dead Earth. Written and drawn by Daniel Warren Johnson, with colors from Mike Spicer, Dead Earth will be a four-issue, prestige format miniseries as part of the publisher’s Black Label line, aimed at older audiences as part of DC’s recent reshuffling of its imprints and age groupings.

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Set in a world where Diana has been sleeping for centuries, the Princess of the Amazons wakes to find the world of man ravaged by nuclear war, rendered a barren wasteland. With her fellow heroes gone and the last remnants of humanity struggling to survive, Wonder Woman has to face this dead earth alone—protecting the last standing city of humankind from gigantic monsters while also uncovering the real mystery behind what caused the apocalypse in the first place. Check out the full cover to the first issue below, by Warren Johnson and Spicer, making its debut here on io9!

Watch out behind you, Diana!
Image: Daniel Warren Johnson and Mike Spicer (DC Comics)

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“I like the audacity of an immortal hero saying to a human, ‘I do this because I love you,’” Warren Johnson said in a statement provided to io9. “That line is in the first issue, actually. I was thinking, what better way to explore how much a character loves a maybe undeserving humanity than to really test the limits of where that love goes, when confronted with the harsh reality of what humanity is capable of? Within this world, humans are doing their best to survive, and when humans are trying to survive, a lot of times the worst parts of ourselves come out. So that’s on full display here in Wonder Woman: Dead Earth.”

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It’s not just humanity that’s gone through some major changes in her absence: Diana has as well, her powers altered by her time sleeping, leading to her taking a more…rough and tumble approach befitting a post-apocalyptic earth. “Because her changed powers are limiting her ability, it allows for more of a down and dirty feel,” Warren Johnson continued. “In the first issue, she has a bar fight—she kicks a table into a bunch of warlords. I’m really excited about that concept of this very elegant figure getting down in the dirt. Getting to draw that is really fun, and it’s a way to reexamine the character.”

As well as the gallery of Warren Johnson’s work-in-progress pencils for Dead Earth above, you can check out some final textless pages from Dead Earth’s first issue below, colored by Spicer.

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Image: Daniel Warren Johnson and Mike Spicer (DC Comics)

Image: Daniel Warren Johnson and Mike Spicer (DC Comics)

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Image: Daniel Warren Johnson and Mike Spicer (DC Comics)

Image: Daniel Warren Johnson and Mike Spicer (DC Comics)

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Image: Daniel Warren Johnson and Mike Spicer (DC Comics)

Wonder Woman: Dead Earth #1 hits shelves in December.


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Source: Kotaku.com

Joker’s Trick: Todd Phillips’ Joker Takes Home the Highest Honor at the Venice Film Festival

The Joker loves to dance, I guess?
Image: Warner Bros.

Inspirer of meme accounts and Blockbuster films alike, the Joker has a new honor to lay at his unstable feet: film festival winner. That’s right, seriously, it happened: Joker, starring Joaquin Phoenix as the DC supervillain, won the Golden Lion, the top prize at the Venice Film Festival.

The film, which premiered at the festival, is now the highest honored movie of the 76 edition of the oldest film festival in the world. Previous honoreers include Rashomon, Brokeback Mountain, and Roma.

It’s an unusual victory for a comic book film, though, for a dramatic title that owes massively to Taxi Driver and stars an auteur’s actor like Joaquin Phoenix, it’s a little less surprising. Accepting the award, director Todd Phillips thanked Warner Bros and DC, “for stepping out of their comfort zone and taking such a bold swing on me and this movie,” and his star, saying, “There is no movie without Joaquin Phoenix. Joaquin is the fiercest and brightest and most open-minded lion I know. Thank you for trusting me with your insane talent.”

Before you go praising Venice’s wisdom and cultural progressiveness in giving a superhero movie the award, though, you should know that convicted rapist Roman Polanski won the second place Silver Lion Grand Jury Prize. Gross. Maybe let’s just cancel all of this, on second thought.

Joker premieres October 4th in the United States.


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Source: Kotaku.com

In a Neat Video, Shazam’s Director Talks the Art of Problem Solving in Film

Zachary Levi, some extras, and some production staff, in Shazam. Did you see ‘em?
Image: Warner Bros.

Film is all about compromise: taking a massive amount of people, resources, and time, and making it all harmonize into a single cohesive artistic product. Even if the way you got there was driven as much by circumstance as vision.

In a delightful video published by Shazam director David Sandberg on his YouTube channel, he expounds on the involved problem-solving logic that goes into making a feature film. Using a simple, not very notable scene in Shazam, he goes through the compromises and adaptations that led from the version of the scene as it appears in the script to what made it on film. Guest starring: a doing-its-best costume department, complicated velcro shoes, and Sandberg’s charming wit.

It’s a fantastic showcase of the way movies, well, don’t happen easily, and without care can become absolutely messy with inconsistencies. And Sandberg is an excellent guide into this complex world. Check it out above.


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Source: Kotaku.com

In a Neat Video, Shazam’s Director Talks the Art of Problem Solving in Film

Zachary Levi, some extras, and some production staff, in Shazam. Did you see ‘em?
Image: Warner Bros.

Film is all about compromise: taking a massive amount of people, resources, and time, and making it all harmonize into a single cohesive artistic product. Even if the way you got there was driven as much by circumstance as vision.

In a delightful video published by Shazam director David Sandberg on his YouTube channel, he expounds on the involved problem-solving logic that goes into making a feature film. Using a simple, not very notable scene in Shazam, he goes through the compromises and adaptations that led from the version of the scene as it appears in the script to what made it on film. Guest starring: a doing-its-best costume department, complicated velcro shoes, and Sandberg’s charming wit.

It’s a fantastic showcase of the way movies, well, don’t happen easily, and without care can become absolutely messy with inconsistencies. And Sandberg is an excellent guide into this complex world. Check it out above.


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Source: Kotaku.com

Mattel’s Comic-Con Batman Exclusives Include Some Very Colorful Action Figures

Lookin’ fab, Bruce
Image: Mattel
Toys and CollectiblesAction figures, statues, exclusives, and other merchandise. Beware: if you look here, you’re probably going to spend some money afterwards.  

Oh sure, there are other parts of Mattel’s Dark Knight-themed exclusives for San Diego Comic-Con. But do you really need convincing beyond the return of the Technicolor dreamboat that is Rainbow Batman?

io9 can exclusively reveal two of Mattel’s exclusive bits of DC merchandise for the rapidly incoming San Diego Comic-Con, which will be tempting our wallets with all kinds of shiny new goodies in just over a month’s time. As 2019 is also the year of two special anniversaries for Batman, the two DC offerings this year are naturally all about Gotham’s favorite crime-fighting son.

First up is Hot Wheels’ diecast car of the Armored Batmobile from the Tim Burton Batman movie, which turns 30 this year. As well as a fully detailed replica of the ‘89 Batmobile itself, the special set also comes with a small diecast figure of Michael Keaton’s Batman, but also a special protective shell replicating the film’s armored upgrade for the vehicle. Simply pop it over the Batmobile and your Hot Wheels car is protected from the deadliest threats a small toy car could ever face! So like, falling off a shelf, probably, if you take it out of the fancy Batman ‘89-themed packaging. If you’re at the con, this set will cost you $25.

If you’re a fan of Mattel’s DC action figures, though, the other offering might be more tempting. A celebration of Batman’s Silver Age roots in the comics, the four-figure set gives you four remarkably silly renditions of Bruce Wayne’s early comic book adventures. Clad in a special, old-school comic art themed box—80-page Giant Batman is a great little throwback joke!—the four figures feature 23 points of articulation, and each one is clad in a colour scheme representing a specific story from the Silver Age of Comics.

The first is a classic Batman representing the Dark Knight’s iconic blue and grey costume for many of his Silver Age adventures, while the other three are more one-off specifics. There’s Negative Suit Batman from Detective Comics #284, in which a blast from an experimental ray rendered Batman averse to light itself. There’s Zebra Batman from Detective Comics #275, in which an encounter with magnet-powered supervillain Zebra-Man left Batman’s suit scrambled into Zebra-esque crazy black-and-white waves.

Those are both pretty colorless schemes, so the set gets a blast of candy-coated crayon in the form of the iconic Rainbow Batman, from Detective Comics #241, which included a storyline where Bruce attempted to protect and injured Dick Grayson from harm by wearing a series of garishly colored Batman outfits while they were out on patrol, distracting thieves away from the Boy Wonder’s compromised state. It’s ridiculous, and I love it, and I will purchase any and all versions of this suit wherever possible. Like right here, where the pricey set will set you back $80.

There’s good news if you’re going to San Diego next month—starting June 17, Mattel will put up a limited collection of both of these exclusives online for prepurchase at its Mattel Store, so fans can get their sets guaranteed to claim at Comic-Con itself from July 17. Pre-purchased sets will begin shipping after the convention comes to a close.

An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated pre-orders for both of these items would be available for fans not attending San Diego Comic-Con. Pre-orders are actually only SDCC attendees to pre-claim their sets, and not available for those not attending. It has been updated to reflect that, and io9 regrets the error. 


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Source: Kotaku.com

Ezra Miller Is Writing His Own Flash Script With Grant Morrison

Ezra Miller as the Flash, maybe for the last time.
Image: Warner Bros.

Surprise! In the embattled saga of slow-moving DC movies, bet you didn’t see that one coming.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, Ezra Miller, in a purported bid to keep on in his role as the Flash, has taken it upon himself to write his own script for the in-production Flash film. Apparently, Miller has had conflict with John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein, the directors currently attached to the project (and known for Spider-Man: Homecoming). While the directorial duo is interested in a lighter, more playful take on the Flash, Miller wants something darker.

So Miller is creating his own version of what he wants to see, and he’s doing it with an unlikely ally: acclaimed comic book writer Grant Morrison. Morrison and Miller have been hired by Warner Bros. to produce Miller’s take, which has higher stakes than just the vibe of the upcoming film. According to THR’s insiders, the success or failure of this script could indicate whether or not Miller stays on in the role of starring Speedster. Supposedly, Miller’s holding deal for the film expires in May, and if they can’t reach a direction for the film by then, it may change pretty drastically.

If Miller leaves, he’ll be the second DC hero to depart his property of late over script problems. Writing a superhero movie that makes everyone involved happy is apparently pretty hard.

One thing, to my mind, is pretty clear: I want to see that script. Even if this movie doesn’t get made, I hope it sees the light of day somehow.


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Source: Kotaku.com

Harley Quinn Brings Fantabulous Fashion to Birds of Prey Video Introducing Black Canary, Black Mask, Huntress & More

While Warner Bros. upcoming Birds of Prey movie will introduce a number of DC’s formidable heroines like Huntress and Black Canary to the DCEU for the first time, it’ll also feature the return of one Harley Quinn who, judging from the film’s title, might embark upon some sort of redemptive arc. New year, new movie, new Harley—and Margot Robbie’s just revealed our first look at her.

Robbie took to her Instagram account today to post a photo of herself in costume as Quinn on the Cathy Yan-directed Birds of Prey set and…well, she looks kind of like if Harley got really into the concept of Harajuku fashion, but like, by way of Gwen Stefani, so make of that what you will.

In any case, she seems to be having a good time and there’s not one mention of her partner formerly known as “Puddin”, which is a welcome change of pace for a character who—let’s all just say it again—was woefully underserved in her first big screen outing and deserves a whole hell of a lot better. Even more curiously, early this morning a video titled “See You Soon” featuring what appears to be the very first Birds of Prey teaser showed up on YouTube and basically the entire cast is there including Robbie’s Harley, Mary Elizabeth Winstead’s Huntress, and Jurnee Smollett-Bell’s Black Canary. Our money’s on the video being a bit of viral marketing, but take a look and judge for yourself.

This team-up film has a screenplay from Christina Hodson who also recently wrote Bumblebee, so we’re hopeful. Hopefully this is a sign of better things to come when Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn)—also starring Jurnee Smollett-Bell, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Rosie Perez, Ella Jay Basco, and Ewan McGregor—hits theaters February 7, 2020.


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Source: Kotaku.com

How Shazam Will Use Childlike Wonder to Set It Apart From the Superhero Pack

If you want to know how Shazam is going to be different from the DC Entertainment films that preceded it, you need only reference two scenes: One in which the hero fights the bad guy in a toy store filled with DC superhero merch, and another where a big fight takes place at a festive winter carnival, complete with a giant Ferris wheel and dozens of games. Not your typical DC movie. Not your typical superhero movie period. But that’s Shazam.

“I like to compare it to ‘80s movies, like Goonies, Ghostbusters, and Back to the Future,” said director David F. Sandberg on the film’s Toronto set. “That sort of like, ‘Oh, it’s a family [film]…kind of.’” Basically, it’s trying to be something you wouldn’t expect.

Like Justice League, Batman v Superman, and Suicide Squad, Shazam is 100 percent set in the DC movie universe. However, hewing closer to Wonder Woman or Aquaman, it’s going to feel like a standalone movie with its own mythology and tone. But even compared to the bright, hopefulness of Wonder Woman and Aquaman, Shazam feels like it could be another level. Similar to the DC Comics story, the hero in the film is 14-year-old Billy Batson (played by Asher Angel), chosen by an ancient wizard (Djimon Hounsou) to be his champion and possess all the power of Shazam (the beings Solomon, Hercules, Atlas, Zeus, Achilles, and Mercury). Just by saying “Shazam,” the boy becomes a full-grown adult, played by Zachary Levi.

The movie has a young cast, is filled with humor, and really, only has one darkly lit set (the crucial Rock of Eternity where Billy meets the Wizard). Even Shazam’s costume isn’t the typical dark blue, black, or green. It’s bright red with a gold belt, boots, and gauntlets, complete with a short white cape and a blinding yellow lightning bolt that lights up practically on set (it goes from dim to blindingly bright with the touch of a button). The idea is, he’s what a 14-year-old who lives in a world where Superman and Wonder Woman exists might draw if he imagined a superhero.

Freddy (Jack Dylan Grazer) and Zachary Levi (Shazam) share a “beer” with director David F. Sandberg.
Photo: Steve Wilkie/DC Comics

“There are two characters that I can think of in all of comic-dom [that actually want to be a superhero]” said Levi. “And it’s Billy Batson and Peter Parker.” Because Billy enjoys being a hero, Levi loved that he could really amp up the enthusiasm. “That I don’t have to restrain myself with the fucking coolness factor is so great,” he said. “I have to act so little. I just get to be me on so many levels.”

That’s why Sandberg, best known for horror films like Lights Out and Annabelle: Creation, cast Levi in the role: He’s not your typical superhero. Even just chatting between takes, he has this unique, palpable, youthful excitement. And yet, when Levi first heard a Shazam movie was coming and Warner Bros. might be interested in him, he told his agents not to even pursue it.

“I knew that the Rock had been cast as Black Adam, so my first reaction is, ‘Why the hell are they sending me this right now?’” he said. “So, I said, ‘Well, I think I’m going to pass because I think that might be a waste of time. This doesn’t seem like I’ve got a shot at getting this job, to be perfectly honest.’”

But he did have a shot, mainly because he has the enthusiasm and childlike exuberance needed for the main character. Plus, the film was structured as a standalone origin story with a much more personal touch, hence the big battles in the toy store and carnival. It lent itself to someone new and different. “It’s a very sort of personal story which I like,” Sandberg said. “I find it more engaging when it’s not an entire world [at stake] and it’s [a] blue beam in the sky”

On April 18, 2018, in Toronto, Canada, the crew of Shazam was on day 51 of their shoot. The cold of Toronto was doubling for Christmas time in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which is when a young Billy is placed in a foster home filled with kids from varying backgrounds. Sandberg shot the scene where Billy enters the house as a three-plus minute Steadicam shot as actors go in and out of various rooms, creating a very dynamic, overwhelming environment. Billy can barely keep his head from spinning, there’s so much going on so fast. And though the family is large, Billy gravitates to Freddy (Jack Dylan Grazer), who is a massive fan of superheroes, going so far as wearing an Aquaman t-shirt during this scene. (So, yes, it’s canon that you can buy DC merch in the DC universe…I wonder who gets the royalties?) And though later in the day Sandberg filmed a scene of Billy trying to escape, this idea of a big, warm, family is at the heart of Shazam.

Freddy and Billy explore Freddy’s room which, as you can see, is filled with DC stuff.
Photo: Warner Bros.

“He’s had a hard life,” Angel said. “He lost his mom when he was really, really young and he’s basically just been searching for her his entire life. He does not want to be with these people, he does not want to be here. He just wants his mom, that’s it. Just wants his mom.”

Along with the story of Billy getting the powers of Shazam, the film will simultaneously follow Dr. Thaddeus Sivana, whom the audience will meet as a young child in the film’s opening. Long before Billy was granted his powers, Sivana was given the same opportunity but was seduced by a more evil power, the Eye of Sin. He spends the rest of his life trying to change that and, eventually, finds himself with the ability to control the seven deadly sins, which will physically appear in the film.

“He is a proper super villain,” said Mark Strong, who plays the character. “He gets to fly, he can create electric fields in his hands and fire electricity. I love the whole notion that in his eye he has seven sins that manifest themselves at various points whenever they or he wants them to. So, it’s a good, proper supervillain.”

Eventually, after Billy is given the powers of Shazam and goes a little too wild (he and Freddy test out the powers and put it on YouTube, which you see in the first trailer), Sivana finds him and the two begin to battle.

Shazam may have met his match in Dr. Sivana.
Photo: Warner Bros.

“He can’t understand that the Wizard has chosen this boy as his champion,” Strong said. “But, it just justifies him in his quest to unify the good force and the evil force and be in control of all of it.”

And Strong—who has played in the comic book sandbox before, taking on a the classic hero-turned-villain Sinestro in Warner’s 2011 Green Lantern film—loves tackling a character with that kind of evil power.

“Sivana should be like, heat-seeking ballistic evil,” he said. “The more frightening you make him, the more you feel that the kids are in jeopardy, and therefore the more that morality term of the balance of good and evil plays out satisfactory. I think if he ever steps back and takes his foot off the gas of being dark, it doesn’t serve the purpose of the story, which is he needs to be a terrifying nemesis.”

Sivana is the one character in the film who looks most unlike the more traditional versions of their comic book counterparts. Instead of the classic, white-lab-coat-doctor depiction, this Sivana is rocking a purple velvet vest and long black leather coat. Otherwise, though, this is a movie largely inspired by DC’s “New 52” line through and through. Everyone on set, from the actors and director, down to the costume designer and props master, cited the Gary Frank/Geoff Johns New 52 run of Shazam as the primary influence on the film. (There’s even a scene of Freddy and Shazam using the new body to try and buy beer, like in Justice League Volume 2 #15). Beyond that, there will, of course, be plenty of nods to Shazam’s history, some of which are so spoilery, we were asked not to mention them.

Don’t let that bubble get in your hair, Billy.
Photo: Warner Bros.

Those comic details extend to all parts of the production. The buttons linking Shazam’s cape to his costume have images of Tawky Tawny on them, a nod to the anthropomorphic tiger who is a frequent ally of Shazam. There are also tigers all over the elaborate “Chilladelphia Winter Carnival” set, which we were told was a very purposeful touch. The set was completely built and recreated in 360 degrees with working rides, games and more. For all intents and purposes, it’s a real carnival…which will get destroyed in the movie. Freddy’s room is also filled with winks and nods to recent DC films.

And yes, in response to all the internet hubbub, there is padding in the Shazam suit. “The only all-natural person ever in history was Christopher Reeve, so there’s your answer, okay?” said costume designer Leah Butler. “But Zach got in incredible shape. So we were very thankful that he was able to do that and his form has really helped so much and really showing our Shazam the way he should be.”

But will the movie as a whole turn out the way we hope?

Like most times you visit a set, everyone was saying the right things and the story on a macro level seems to work very well. All the pieces were there to make a DC movie that has a whole new tone and accessibility.

“I think everything is informing everything else,” Strong said. “Guardians of the Galaxy comes out that has a sense of humor. That now infuses Thor [Ragnarok] which gives that a big sense of humor. Now we’ve moved into the world of Black Panther and now we’ve got a female superhero in Wonder Woman. It’s as if everything is pushing the genre onwards and that, I think, can only be a good thing.”

Shazam opens April 5.


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Source: Kotaku.com