Tag Archives: kotakucore

Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3’s Inhumans Level Is Just Sad

Most of Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3’s story chapters are lengthy affairs filled with enemies to fight, puzzles to solve, characters to recruit, and multiple boss battles. Chapter seven, set in the moon-based Inhuman city of Attilan, is a ten-minute trip to the most boring place in the Marvel universe.

Of all of Marvel’s properties, the Inhumans have had the hardest time breaking out of comic books into more mainstream media. The Inhumans movie was announced in 2014, then canned. It became a 2017 television series, which was laughably bad. The only time the Inhumans have been entertaining outside of comics is in ABC’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. series, and that’s because the show never went Attilan to hang out with the Inhuman royal family.

Chapter seven of Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3 sees our assembled heroes doing just that: stopping by Attilan to hang out with the Inhuman royal family. At the urging of Crystal, an Inhuman who joins the team earlier in the game, the alliance seeks Attilan’s aid in protecting the Infinity Stones from Thanos’ Black Order. Speaking for King Black Bolt, whose voice can shatter mountains, Queen Medusa tells Crystal that the Inhumans live on the moon in order to stay out of human affairs and they’ve no plans to change that now.

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Fortunately for our heroes, villains attack. Which villains? Why, the only real villain the Inhumans have, Black Bolt’s brother, Maximus. Ever jealous of his brother’s power and ever hungry for the throne, Maximus chooses the exact moment a cadre of the universe’s greatest superheroes show up in order to stage a coup.

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To back up and provide some context, the Inhumans are an ancient race of super-powered humans created by Kree scientists to use as soldiers in the ongoing conflict between the Kree and the Skrull. After the Kree discovered a prophecy that stated the Inhumans would be the downfall of their empire, they left to the Inhumans to fend for themselves on Earth. Young Inhumans gain their powers through exposure to something called terrigen mist, though in rare cases the terrigenesis process does not result in powers. Maximus is one of those rare cases, and it’s made him a real dick.

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The entire chapter involves three battles against Maximus’ Alpha Primitives troops, who are as generic as lackies can be, followed by a battle against the man himself. It’s not a boring boss battle, as one might expect when pitting powerful heroes against a guy with a gun. Maximus has robot drones that fire powerful beam attacks. A guest character, whom I will not name for spoiler reasons, joins the battle, creating shields that players can hide under to avoid damage.

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But that’s it, really. The entire chapter spans all of three rooms, so there’s no exploring to do. No new characters join the alliance. The Inhumans don’t change their minds and decide to help. Instead, the group receives a distress call from the Winter Soldier and rush off to Wakanda, kicking off a much lengthier and more interesting chapter.

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Marvel’s been trying to make the Inhumans a thing for the past decade, mainly to fill the role of mutated humans with powers, since Fox had the film and movie rights to the X-Men. Now that Disney owns Fox, Marvel could just focus on the entertaining mutants and stop shoehorning the boring Inhumans into otherwise exciting video games. I guess someone felt the need to give it one last shot, though. Too bad it still didn’t work.

Source: Kotaku.com

The Mother Series 30th Anniversary Event In Smash Bros. Ultimate Is Too Cruel

July 27 will mark 30 years since the original Mother came out in Japan on NES. To celebrate, Nintendo is running a Mother-themed Spirit Board event in Smash Bros. Ultimate, torturing fans who have been desperate to see the rest of the series localized in the West.

Smash Ultimate’s Spirit Board is a single-player affair where people can grind for rewards and grow their collection of spirits, each representing some artifact from Nintendo’s video game history. The one dedicated to the Mother games is a hopelessly bittersweet affair, however, because it reminds fans that Mother 3 still hasn’t been localized.

It took fans no time at all, in fact, to hone in on a strange anomaly in the art Nintendo is using to promote the event, first through its Japanese Twitter account and now through Nintendo Europe. Specifically, they’ve focused on a small portion in the bottom of the image that shows sunflowers in front of a blue sky and clouds. Whatever that part of the image is taken from, it appears to be completely new. Maybe a remaster? Or at the very least some new Mother 3-related content coming to Smash Ultimate?

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While the sunflowers are a reference to a famous scene from Mother 3, they’ve apparently never been rendered the way they appear in the promotional art before. Meanwhile, the sky and clouds appear to come from Smash’s Tortimer Island stage. None of this probably means anything, but wild speculation like this often happens when it comes to Mother 3.

When Earthbound, known as Mother 2 in Japan, released in North America in 1995 for the SNES, many fans had no idea it was part of a series. The first game wasn’t published outside of Japan for decades, and the third still hasn’t been. Even the most oblivious Earthbound fans realized something was up when Lucas, the protagonist of Mother 3, appeared in 2008’s Smash Bros. Brawl.

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Mother 3 had only come out two years earlier in Japan on the Game Boy Advance. If Nintendo was going to feature him in its major crossover fighting game series, surely it would bring the actual source material over at some point as well, either via a port or remaster. And yet, nothing.

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“Localize Mother 3” has become such a common refrain among fans, appearing on random signs at wrestling events and on the wishlists for every new Nintendo Direct, that it’s become almost something of a joke, uttered ironically to mask the sincere desperation deep inside players’ hearts.

That’s the only way to read the latest Mother 3 conspiracy theory: partly born of desperation and partly the result of fan brains broken by the fact that the game has still never been rereleased. Others have already poked fun at the attempts to read into the series’ future based on Spirit Board tea leaves.

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Most of the responses to the speculation on Twitter have been the same. “Don’t do that,” wrote one person. “Don’t give me hope.”

Source: Kotaku.com

Modder Recreates Skyward Sword Dungeon In Breath Of The Wild

For players who may have been disappointed with the lack of traditional dungeons in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a new set of modding tools is helping players add dungeons inspired by previous games.

As spotted by PC Gamer, Earth Temple is a mod that adds the dungeon of the same name from The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword. Created by a modder who goes by Kreny for the Wii U version of Breath of the Wild, the dungeon comes complete with tons of lava, platforming puzzles, and even a boss fight. While it’s not a one-to-one recreation of the original Earth Temple, it seems to get the spirit of it right.

The mod was made possible in part thanks to the visual editor “Ice-Spear” and collision data tool “Ice-Hall,” both of which were created by a modder called HailtoDodongo in order to help Breath of the Wild fans make more advanced dungeons for the game. “My goal is to get the feeling of old, bigger Zelda dungeons,” the modder told PC Gamer in an interview last month. While HailtoDodongo’s work includes ambitious additions like the Sky Maze dungeon, the tools are one small step toward a sort of unofficial “Zelda Maker” for the Wii U.

At this year’s E3, Nintendo announced it was making a sequel to Breath of the Wild that effectively grew out of how ambitious its original DLC plans for the game were. In light of the lack of new content then, it’s nice to see fans being able to add their own creations to the game to give players new dungeons to explore, at least for those with the Wii U version of the game.

About the author

Ethan Gach

Kotaku staff writer. You can reach him at ethan.gach@kotaku.com

Source: Kotaku.com

Speedrunner Beats His Punch-Out!! World Record With New King Hippo Trick

Screenshot: Joseph Harris (YouTube)

Mike Tyson’s Punch-Out!! for the NES hasn’t had a new speedrunning world record in over a year. The last one recorded was set in April 2018 by Summoningsalt with a time of 15 minutes and 10.5 seconds. But over the weekend, Summoningsalt returned, shaving a fraction of a second off his previous record. He was able to do that thanks to a new strategy for manipulating the fight against King Hippo in order to expose his weakness as early as possible.

King Hippo is impervious to every attack except when he opens his mouth, at which point he grabs his shorts to keep them from falling down and leaves his himself defenseless. However, there’s generally no pattern for when he’ll do so. He might open his mouth early in the round or continue to throw jabs, an outcome that can sink even the most expeditious speedrun attempts. On top of that, he needs to do it at least three times for players to KO him. But thanks to new insight into the game’s internal workings, it’s now possible to greatly increase the likelihood of King Hippo opening his mouth on all three of his first punches.

In a Google document released on July 7, Punch-Out!! speedrunner Lucandor158 and his brother, Zoxsox, detailed their research into how the game’s internal memory affects when King Hippo will open his mouth. “RNG in MTPO is based off the memory address 0018 in RAM,” they wrote, referring to how the game mathematically decides which move an opponent will use. “This value changes every frame based on 2 other memory locations: 0019 and 001E.”

The value in 0019 is determined by players’ cumulative controller inputs during a playthrough, looping every time that value surpasses 255. 001E simply keeps count of the number of frames that have occurred. As a result, it’s possible to influence the values that appear in 0018, and thus whether King Hippo opens his mouth when the fight starts.

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“When hippo decides whether or not to open his mouth, he looks at the 3 rightmost bits of 0018. If these bits are 001, 011, or 110, he will open his mouth,” wrote the brothers. “Any other combination will result in no open.” While the math going on behind the scenes can get a bit complicated, the strategy itself is more straightforward in practice.

“First punch involves starting the fight in the correct 8-frame window, which isn’t too hard to do—I probably get this part correctly 90-95 percent of the time,” Summoningsalt told Kotaku in an email. “In order to get the third punch to always be an open, the frames you hit the first two punches on must add up to either 3 or 4.” He added that it’s still hard since there are no visual cues to help with counting frames, but after practicing, he’s been able to create the conditions for King Hippo to open his mouth a third time consecutively about 75 percent of the time.

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That’s what happened during his attempt over the weekend, with the King Hippo fight taking almost two seconds less time to complete than normal. When combined with some other short time losses earlier in the run, he was able to secure his new world record of 15 minutes and 10.11 seconds.

Lucandor158 and Zoxsox speculate that this is only the beginning of a new era in Punch-Out!! speedrunning. In the past, world records like Summoningsalt’s have leaned heavily on skill and experience, but the brothers believe the same RNG manipulation could potentially be applied to other fights. It’s even conceivable that the entire game could be reverse engineered in this way to reveal the perfect route through it, with every bob, weave, and punch planned out ahead of time. Not bad for a 35-year-old NES game.

Source: Kotaku.com

Report: Rick Fox’s Esports Organization Plans To Sell League Of Legends Slot To Rams, Arsenal Owner

Photo: Matthew Eisman (Getty Images)

Former LA Laker Rick Fox’s esports organization Team Echo Fox plans to sell its slot in the North American League of Legends Championship Series to Los Angeles Rams owner Stan Kroenke, according to a new report by ESPN.

It’s the latest development in an increasingly complex drama that’s been unfolding since late April when an investor in Echo Fox, Amit Raizada, was revealed to have used a racial slur against fellow business partner, Jace Hall. Riot Games, which runs the League of Legends Championship Series, gave Echo Fox the choice of either removing the racist individual from its organization or losing its spot in the league.

It now appears that Echo Fox has decided to exit the league. ESPN reports that Kroenke’s monolithic LA-based holding company, Kroenke Sports & Entertainment, which also owns Arsenal and LA’s Overwatch team, is the proposed buyer, having offered Echo Fox $30.25 million for its League of Legends franchise. Esports organization Immortals reportedly purchased a slot in the league from Infinite Esports for between $35 million and $45 million last month.

“Echo Fox has submitted a proposal to sell its slot in the LCS to a new ownership group,” Riot announced on Twitter tonight. “The LCS is reviewing the potential sale and will be meeting with the proposed ownership group in the coming days.”

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The news comes a day after Echo Fox missed the extended deadline by which Raizada was supposed to have left. Riot originally announced on May 15 that organization had 60 days to remove Raizada, whose behavior ran afoul of league conduct rules, or face some sort of punishment. After 60 days, when no resolution had been reached, Riot delayed taking any action by another week, it now seems in order to give Echo Fox the time it needed to sort out a deal.

Neither Echo Fox nor Riot responded to a request for comment. (Update – 10:25pm: “We’re working diligently to minimize disruption to Echo Fox players and staff for the 2019 season in partnership with the LCS Players’ Association,” Chris Greeley, LCS Commissioner, said in a statement to Kotaku via email. “If LCS rejects the proposal, Echo Fox has agreed that LCS will be taking over the sale process for the slot. Our goal is to make sure we have an orderly transition and a new team ready for the 2020 season.”)

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In April, a report by Richard Lewis for Dexerto surfaced an email by Raizada in which he used the n-word to refer to Hall. It also accused Raizada of other instances of racism and harassment, including threatening Fox’s family. Raizada admitted to and apologized for his use of the n-word, but denied ever threatening Fox’s family, despite Lewis sharing another email that appeared to show him doing precisely that in a subsequent report.

According to an internal email from Fox to other Echo Fox shareholders obtained by Lewis, Fox was planning to sell his stake in the organization and leave over Raizada’s racist behavior. However, he later appeared to change his mind and told TMZ he was committed to trying to stay with the organization and force Raizada out instead, elaborating in the inaugural episode of a new podcast co-hosted with Hall at the end of May that his initial decision to leave was simply an “exploratory decision.”

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It’s unclear what will happen next given that Raizada appears to still be affiliated with the Echo Fox, but potentially $30.25 million for its spot in the LCS could be a boon to the investors in an organization which last fall dropped players and teams across a number of games amid a “realigning of its portfolio.”

Echo Fox’s League of Legends team, which would likely still finish out the current summer season under the terms of any deal, is currently ranked last.

Source: Kotaku.com

Overwatch’s New Hero Sigma Is Slow But Scary

What would you do if you could control gravity? Would you float everywhere? Hurl boulders at people? Yell all the time about a mysterious melody that haunts your every semi-lucid moment? Overwatch’s newest hero, the unhinged, accidentally evil astrophysicist Sigma, can do all of that and more. He’s fun to play, but he definitely takes some getting used to.

When I first started playing Sigma on Overwatch’s PC public test server earlier today, I felt uncomfortable. Despite the fact that his notably naked toesie-wosies hover about a foot off the ground at all times, he moves at a glacial pace, like most tanks. His primary attack—two “Hypersphere” projectiles that look like they were stolen from a Destiny merchandise stand—also travels a bit more slowly and arcs in a more exaggerated fashion than you might initially expect, and it has a fairly limited range.

Taken together, these things make him feel a little awkward, perhaps even vulnerable. This makes sense: He’s a barely-coherent old man whose powers come from his mind, not his brittle body. Even in those early uncomfortable moments, though, Sigma begins to reveal just how tricksy he can be. His orbs, for example, ricochet off walls, and even if they don’t nail a target square between the eyes, their impact results in an area-of-effect distortion that pulls enemies ever so slightly toward them. This can be used to disrupt aim.

It’s the rest of Sigma’s kit that turns him into a potential force to be reckoned with, though I’m still unsure how well he’ll mesh with other tanks right now. Most importantly, he has a portable shield, which likely means players will use him as a main tank like Reinhardt, Winston, and Orisa. Like his other abilities, his shield takes some getting used to. It’s similar to the floating shield Symmetra had several thousand major and minor revisions ago, except that Sigma can stop his wherever he wants and recall it with a quick button press. It’s versatile, but it has some drawbacks. You’ve got to recall it and not re-deploy it in order for it to start recharging, and it has a cooldown after it’s been busted. This means you can’t be quite as reactive as when you’re playing, say, Reinhardt, and you’ve got to have good positional awareness, because Sigma is a sitting duck without a glowing blue wall to hide behind.

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Despite an almost complete lack of mobility abilities, Sigma can, to a limited extent, mitigate threats from enemies who get all up in his face. Two of his most interesting abilities, Kinetic Grasp and Accretion, serve multiple purposes. The former allows him to freeze projectiles in midair and convert them into additional shields for his HP bar, while the latter lets him smash bull-rushing fools with a big ol’ rock, resulting in a brief stun.

Both can be used to buy you some time when enemies are crashing into your personal space, but they’re also versatile tools in their own rights. Currently, Kinetic Grasp can eat powerful ults like Zarya’s Graviton Surge and Hanzo’s Dragonstrike, à la D.Va’s Defense Matrix. Sigma’s ability does, however, have a longer cooldown and more limited range than D.Va’s devourer of all things big and flashy, so hopefully he won’t slurp up the game’s balance, too. Accretion, meanwhile, actually has better range than Sigma’s regular attack, though you’ve got to be smart about how you arc it.

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Then there’s his ult, which seems, at this early phase, pretty darn monstrous. Sigma rises into the air, temporarily gaining an enormous boost in mobility. While in this state, he can select a large, circular area of space on the ground. Enemies in this area will be lifted up into the air and slammed down, knocking off 50 percent of their full health total. Not only is this devastating from a damage perspective, but it can be used to move entire teams out from behind shields or lift them off points they’d bunkered down on. It can also combo extremely nicely with abilities ranging from Roadhog’s hook to McCree’s “Deadeye” ult. It feels like an absolute tide-turner, although I haven’t gotten to test it as much as I’d like in conjunction with other heroes since, surprise, everyone on the PTR is playing Sigma right now.

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Sigma’s only been playable for part of today, meaning he’s still buried under a heap of questions so dense that not even his airborne feetsies can breathe. How will he synergize with other heroes and compositions, especially with the game-changing 2-2-2 role lock just around the corner? Are his abilities tuned well, or will they need some nerfing and buffing before he hits live servers? Why does he not wear shoes? I mean, on the one hand, if I could float, I guess I wouldn’t need them, but on the other hand I wouldn’t be floating through a series of bullet-riddled battlefields that have already claimed countless feet as casualties.

For now, though, Sigma is certainly a complex and unique tank, even if some of his abilities hearken back to ideas that Overwatch has already experimented with before. I’m excited to see what players do with him once he’s in the fray for real.

Source: Kotaku.com

I Brought My Switch To A House Full Of Kids And All Hell Broke Loose

Kotaku Game DiaryDaily thoughts from a Kotaku staffer about a game we’re playing.  

I’m visiting my twin sister in Texas this week, where she has a lot of cool stuff: a swimming pool, the world’s most perfect dog, two horses, and my four nieces and nephews, aged 5 to 11. I have one very cool thing that I could offer to them: a Nintendo Switch. I thought it would be a great thing to share with them and would make me the coolest uncle. It has not worked out that way.

All four of the kids enjoy games, but my two nephews are the most obsessed. Earlier this year, my sister bought them an Xbox, which allowed me to win some serious Cool Uncle Points when I introduced the kids to some of my favorite age-appropriate games, like Spelunky and Rocket League. Everything was going great, until the Xbox broke. Since then, my nephews have been playing Roblox and Minecraft on their iPads, but they haven’t been able to play many other games. I thought they’d be really excited to get to play with my Switch. I even bought a copy of Mario Kart ahead of the trip so we could have something to play together.

For a while, it worked. The kids did okay with sharing Mario Kart, even though I only have two Switch controllers and there are four kids. When the shine started to wear off of Mario Kart, I got them into Downwell, and my sister wasn’t even mad that it involves a bit of shooting (she doesn’t want them playing violent games). I had to steer them away from Nuclear Throne and Broforce without telling them the games are full of blood and gore, which would only make them want to play them more. The kids also aren’t allowed to see Fortnite, per my sister’s orders, so I had to find a few minutes to hide with my Switch in a corner to watch Saturday’s robot-versus-monster battle. My littlest nephew, who’s five, tried to play Breath of the Wild but lost interest after I wouldn’t let him start a new game and destroy my save progress. I downloaded the demos of Pokemon Let’s Go and Yoshi’s Crafted World, and I repeatedly explained why we couldn’t buy every $60 game on the eShop. Mostly, though, they enjoyed what my Switch had to offer, despite these limitations.

Then I decided to buy them Boxboy + Boxgirl. That went very wrong.

I thought Boxboy + Boxgirl would be the perfect game for them to play together. I’d seen our editor-in-chief play it, and it looked simple enough for the five-year-old but challenging enough to intrigue my ten-year-old nephew as well. And it was, for a little while. But a game that involves cooperating to solve spatial puzzles is a recipe for disaster even for adults, not to mention kids who have short fuses and are hyped up on getting to play a new system. They started to knock each other off the levels on purpose, which was all in good fun until it led to arguments, which led to further in-game sabotage. The littlest struggled to solve the puzzles, and the older one got frustrated explaining the solution over and over. My nieces wanted to play too, and trying to figure out how to share became a puzzle in its own right, one that mostly ended in screaming. My sister had to take the Switch away more than once, which then necessitated me hiding it while fending off repeated questions of “can I play with the Switch now?” I spent the morning sitting in front of the drawer the Switch is hidden in while my littlest nephew eyed me shrewdly and tried to figure out the best way to trick me into giving it back.

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At this point, I feel bad about having brought my Switch with me. My dreams of being piled up with the kids on the couch, laughing and cheering to Mario Kart, have been replaced by harsh reality: screaming, crying, resentment, and hurt feelings. I even apologized to my sister for bringing the Switch. She said she doesn’t mind and, somehow, she is still glad I brought it.

The whole situation has given me a lot more compassion for what it means to be a parent. The age differences between all her kids makes it hard to find activities they can do together, and while the older ones are mature enough to know the younger ones act the way they do because of their age, they’re also not quite old enough to keep from totally losing their cool and making any disagreement worse. The Switch has highlighted some of the stresses that come with having a family, and I really admire my sister’s patience with how many people and feelings she’s responsible for mediating every day.

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Of course, it hasn’t all been bad. It’s been really cool to talk to the kids about games. They’re very impressed with my job, even if they don’t understand that I don’t actually make video games. We’ve had a lot of fun playing Mario Kart. It’s been cute to watch my little nephew go on about expert strategies that he has completely invented. He’s especially proud that we’ve gotten so many trophies in Boxboy + Boxgirl because we used so many blocks. Okay, actually, we haven’t earned any trophies, and he’s mistaken. I can’t get him to understand that you get the trophies for using fewer blocks, not more, and that he’s just seeing pictures of the trophies rather than earning them, but honestly, I like his version better. Since he can’t read, I’ve gotten to completely invent the story of Hollow Knight every time we talk to a character, which is a lot more fun than whatever the game is actually about. We’ve also gotten to have lots of non-video game fun: my oldest nephew taught me how to make paper airplanes that don’t suck, my littlest niece sang all of The Greatest Showman to me, and I got to see my oldest niece compete in a barrel race. I live alone, so it’s been nice to get to be part of a family, even when it’s overwhelming. Writing this article has taken about ten times longer than it should have, as kids keep running over to ask where the Switch is, but they’ve also come over to tell me things they’re thinking, show me a book or toy, and even tell me they’re glad I’m here.

I’m not sure if my sister will buy the kids their own Switch, though she’s told them she will if they help out around the house. The littlest two are currently cleaning up the playroom, with the older one coaching the younger one through doing the best job they can. Sure, it’s all in service of getting a Switch, but they’re getting along and making my sister’s life a little easier. We’ll see how long that lasts.

Source: Kotaku.com

Nvidia Geforce RTX 2080 Super Review: Just A Bit Of A Boost

Following the recent release of the GeForce RTX 2060 Super and 2070 Super, we have the final piece in Nvidia’s Super puzzle. Coming in at the same $700 price point as its predecessor, the new RTX 2080 Super version will offer some performance increases, though we suspect we won’t see anything too dramatic considering the proposed specs and the fact that Nvidia doesn’t need to cannibalize sales of the 2080 Ti, nor does it have any direct competition at this price point.

The GeForce RTX 2080 Super adds two extra SM units for a 4% increase in cores, meaning this is now a fully enabled TU104 silicon. This is the same silicon used by the standard RTX 2080, as well as the 2070. There’s also a 9% frequency uplift for the base clock, and a 6% increase for the boost clock. Due to the way GPU boost works though, we anticipate this will be closer to a 3 to 4% increase in frequency.

The GDDR6 memory also sees a boost and now we’re looking at a peak data transfer speed of 15.5 Gbps, up from 14 Gbps, an 11% improvement in memory performance. These upgrades have increased the TDP by 16% from 215 watts up to 250 watts.

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Nvidia says the RTX 2080 Super delivers a robust 4K experience along with real-time ray tracing. For this review we’re going to look at the 4K gaming experience, while skipping over ray tracing for now as our opinion of the technology in its current state hasn’t changed since we covered it many months ago.

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We do plan to revisit ray tracing on a roundup piece with the Super graphics cards soon though, so if you’re interested in the technology that will no doubt be worth a read.

For testing we’ve used our usual gaming rig comprised of an Intel Core i9-9900K clocked at 5 GHz with 32GB of DDR4-3400 memory. The latest drivers available at the time of testing have been used. We have 13 games to look at before the usual performance breakdowns and cost per frame data.

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Benchmarks

The newest game in our battery of benchmarks, F1 2019, sees the 2080 Super deliver 75 fps on average making it — drum roll please — 4% faster than the standard 2080 and 17% slower than the 2080 Ti.

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Thankfully the margin is a little more noteworthy in Battlefield V. Here the 2080 Super offered an 8% performance uplift over the older 2080 and that basically put it on par with the newly discontinued Radeon VII.

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Rainbow Six Siege sees a minor 3% boost to the average frame rate over the standard 2080, though we do see a 6% improvement for the 1% low performance. This time the 2080 Super was 15% slower than the Ti model.

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Can we interest you in 1-2 fps more performance? Good, because that’s all you’re going to get in Metro Exodus. That’s to be expected given the specs.

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A 6% performance boost in Resident Evil 2 may be cause for celebration (for the same price if we’re totally fair), taking us to 66 fps on average at 4K, for some nice smooth gameplay.

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We didn’t quite hit 60 fps in Shadow of the Tomb Raider but given the 2080 Ti just falls short that’s not surprising. The extra memory bandwidth does allow the 2080 Super to beat the vanilla 2080 by an 11% margin in this title.

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Memory bandwidth isn’t that important in Fortnite, so a small 3% performance uplift over the standard 2080 for 72 fps on average at 4K. Still it was a nice smooth and very crisp looking gaming experience.

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When testing with The Division 2, the Super provided us with a 4% performance boost over the standard RTX 2080.

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DiRT Rally 2.0 gets a 3 fps performance boost. Ignore the 1% low result and we see a breathtaking 4% performance uplift.

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Forza Horizon 4, like Shadow of the Tomb Raider, is a game that benefits from some extra memory bandwidth at 4K and here we see a more significant 7% performance boost, taking the 2080 Super to 92 fps on average.

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We also see a 6% performance boost in Far Cry New Dawn which allowed the 2080 Super to just edge out the Radeon VII.

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The 2080 Super provided a 4% performance improvement from the standard 2080 in World War Z.

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Finally we have Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey for a 3 fps performance uplift, though that does equate to a 6% increase in frame rate.

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Power Consumption and Temperatures

The RTX 2080 Super consumes 5% more power than the standard 2080, which sounds right given the specs and what we just saw performance-wise. This means it consumed 6% less power than the Radeon VII, but 24% more than the new 5700 XT.

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We also measured total system consumption from the wall and here we see the faster 2080 Super increased total draw by 12% over the standard 2080. There are a few reasons for this increase, the GDDR6 memory will be consuming more power given the 11% overclock, and the CPU will also be working slightly harder given the increase in performance. What’s interesting is that the 2080 Super does push system consumption higher than that of the Radeon VII.

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We won’t go into overclocking as with all Turing GPUs you’re likely looking at a ~10% performance boost at best through manual tinkering. The Founders Edition model we tested maxed out at 72 degrees in a 21 degree room and there it maintained a core clock speed of 1905 MHz with a fan speed of 1820 RPM, making this graphics card rather cool and quiet after an hour-long test in F1 2019.

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Performance Summary

The RTX 2080 Super looks to be the least “super” graphics card from Nvidia yet, but before we get too bummed out with this release, let’s take a look at some performance breakdown graphs and cost per frame data.

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RTX 2080 Super vs. RTX 2080 @ 4K

On average the 2080 Super was 5% faster than the standard 2080. For testing we used the MSI RTX 2080 Duke which comes with a modest overclock that sees it maintain 1905 MHz under load, the same operating frequency as the 2080 Super FE card.

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RTX 2080 Super vs. RTX 2080 @ 1440p

For those of you gaming at 1440p on average you’re looking at a 6% performance uplift, similar to what we saw at 4K. Those of you who were planning to jump the gun anyway, will see some extra frames for the same price, so there’s that.

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RTX 2080 Super vs. RTX 2080 Ti @ 4K

On average the RTX 2080 Super was 16% slower when compared to the 2080 Ti. This is not a massive difference and it is around 30% cheaper, so if you’re not after the most premium 4K experience possible, the 2080 Super looks to be a decent option.

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RTX 2080 Super vs. RTX 2080 Ti @ 1440p

For gaming at 1440p the 2080 Ti looks to be a bit of a waste as the more affordable RTX 2080 Super was just 12% slower and never more than 19% slower worst case.

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RTX 2080 Super vs. Radeon RX 5700 XT @ 4K

When compared to AMD’s new Radeon RX 5700 XT, the 2080 Super was on average 26% faster at 4K. Do consider that the 2080 is considerably more expensive (it costs 75% more), yet the GeForce was never more than 47% faster. Evidently the higher-end you go, the less value you get so you’ll have to decide if paying that kind of price premium for the ability to run at slightly higher quality settings is worth it.

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RTX 2080 Super vs. Radeon RX 5700 XT @ 1440p

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When gaming at 1440p the RTX 2080 Super is less attractive as it was just 17% faster than the 5700 XT on average.

Cost per Frame and Conclusion

Starting with a MSRP comparison and using the 4K gaming data, we see that the RTX 2080 Super comes out at a cost of $9.85 per frame. Given it comes in at the same $700 MSRP as the original 2080, that makes it roughly 6% cheaper per frame. Compared to the 5700 XT you are paying 41% more per frame which is a massive price premium, but that’s just what you’re faced with when going up a level in performance.

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The 1440p results are less favorable, again looking strictly at MSRPs. We see that the 2080 Super costs $5.73 per frame, or 5% cheaper than the standard RTX 2080. It’s also 52% more costly than the 5700 XT per frame, so unless you need to go from around 106 fps on average to 122 fps, the Radeon GPU is a more sensible purchase.

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But what about current market pricing? The only major change in the analysis would be that the RTX 2080 Super will keep its price, while soon to be extinguished RTX 2080 cards have dropped down to $630 for some models. In that case the standard 2080 offers a better value given the small change in performance.

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Earlier this month we got the RTX 2070 Super and 2060 Super. The 2070 Super provides 12% more performance than the standard model and we liked the boost enough to kill off most competitors at this price point, though the Radeon RX 5700 XT comes very close in performance for less money. The 2060 Super, on the other hand, gave us nothing. It costs 18% more than the standard 2060 and was just 8% faster on average. We’re seeing a similar story with the RTX 2080 Super, where the performance lift is even less significant.

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Overall, the RTX 2080 Super is a solid premium-priced GPU, it’s just not particularly exciting. Officially discounting the RTX 2080 to $600 would have been worlds more thrilling in our opinion. Put in other words, the RTX 2080 Super is ~9% faster on average than the GTX 1080 Ti at both 1440p and 4K. So we’re getting a performance boost, at the exact same price point, almost two and a half years later. Without a doubt, GTX 1080 Ti owners can rejoice at the news.

Source: Kotaku.com

The Inevitable Dead Or Alive 6 Swimsuit DLC Is Here

It’s been nearly five months since the release of Dead or Alive 6. Five months full of solid fighting with few distractions outside of some crossover characters and pirate and wedding costumes. Enough of that. Bring on the swimsuits.

The first installment of Dead or Alive 6‘s second season of downloadable content is called Seaside Eden. It includes a free island paradise stage, complete with a volleyball net and a hilarious dolphin hazard. Players keen on paying can acquire swimsuits and accessories for 26 characters, enough to turn a respectable fighting tournament into a tawdry display worthy of the smuttier side of Dead or Alive’s name.

The swimsuits and scenery are the first part of the second Dead or Alive 6 season pass, which will eventually include 72 costumes and an additional playable character.

Source: Kotaku.com

Overwatch’s New Hero Is Sigma, An Astrophysicist Who Doesn’t Know He’s A ‘Living Weapon’

After a series of teases that culminated in the apparent demise of Overwatch director Jeff Kaplan, Blizzard has revealed the game’s latest hero. His name is Sigma, and he has the power to see math. Also, perhaps related to that, he can control gravity.

Today, Blizzard introduced Sigma in an animated story trailer. “Gravity is a harness,” Sigma says in the trailer. “I have harnessed the harness.” But that wasn’t enough for him, so he decided to try and double-harness the power of a black hole. That, however, appears to have driven him mad, or at least stuffed his brain so full that it’s like an overflowing bowl of mashed potatoes.

Like many a great mad scientist before him, Sigma is evil. Specifically, the trailer ends with him standing alongside Widowmaker, Sombra, Moira (who’d be the obvious ship if we weren’t all 99 percent sure she’s gay), and other members of Overwatch’s Talon organization. But, Blizzard adds, there’s a twist: Sigma is apparently “unaware” that he’s “being used as a living weapon.”

We’ll almost certainly find out more about how he plays later this week.

Source: Kotaku.com