Tag Archives: steam reviews

Destiny 2, As Told By Steam Reviews

It’s not every day that a series with as much legacy and history as Destiny suddenly orbital-drops onto Steam. This has resulted in a horde of Desti-neophytes rushing to see what all the fuss is about. Are they enjoying diving into the deep end of Bungie’s loot ocean of a game, though? Yes and no.

At this point in its life cycle, Destiny 2 is obstinately, maximally itself. This means heaps of lore, stats, currencies, and activities that can lead to a pretty overwhelming experience for newcomers. While many longtime Destiny 2 players are just happy to finally have their favorite shooter-MMO hybrid on Steam, some new players have expressed confusion and even rage over all the things they have to come to grips with upon starting the game. Also, Warframe fans have decided to turn Destiny 2‘s arrival on Steam into some weird tribalistic showdown between two free games that everybody can enjoy? It’s the internet, so I guess I’m not sure what else I was expecting.

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Source: Kotaku.com

Dota Underlords, As Told By Steam Reviews

SteamedSteamed is dedicated to all things in and around Valve’s PC gaming service.  

Are you someone who still battles in video games by using your fingers to directly input commands, like some kind of barbarian? That’s old hat. Today, auto-battlers are all the rage. Simply buy some guys, arrange said guys, and they (the guys) will do the battling for you. With Dota Underlords, Valve rushed to capitalize on the trend that began with a user-created mod of its own game Dota 2. So far, Underlords’ speedy turnaround seems to have paid off.

Underlords, currently in early access, is heavily based on Dota Auto Chess, a mod in which eight players purchase automated units and try to outdo each other in a mini-tournament of 1v1 duels. It may not sound like much, but it’s easy to learn, and once you’ve let your brain marinate in the intricacies for a bit, it’s addictive as heck. Steam users are pleased with Valve’s faithfulness to the original mod, as well as the subtle quality-of-life improvements and item changes that streamline some of the mod’s sloppier elements. Some people, however, are wary of hero and synergy changes Valve has made, while others just don’t dig how RNG-based the game (and genre) is. For most, though, Underlords is hitting the spot.

Source: Kotaku.com

Bloodstained: Ritual Of The Night, As Told By Steam Reviews

What is a Kickstarter-funded spiritual successor to Castlevania? Either a miserable or non-miserable pile of secrets (and gameplay mechanics), depending on which Steam reviewer you talk to.

Whether they love it or feel lukewarm about it, like Kotaku’s Joshua Rivera, nobody’s pretending Bloodstained: Ritual Of The Night is something that it’s not. This, pretty much everyone agrees, is a Metroidvania throwback in the style of director Koji Igarashi’s beloved classic, Castlevania: Symphony Of The Night, albeit with some modern quality-of-life updates and elements from more recent Castlevanias like Dawn of Sorrow. But is that enough to pass muster in ye newe year of 2019? That’s the real question. Broadly, Steam reviewers seem to think it is, with 93 percent of reviews registering as positive so far. But not everybody’s in agreement.

Source: Kotaku.com

Mordhau, As Told By Steam Reviews

Games with good swordplay are rare. Multiplayer games with good swordplay are rarer still, like Excalibur of Arthurian legend. It’s no wonder, then, that Mordhau has cut through the clutter and laid siege to the Steam charts. Steam users are digging the heck out of it.

Kotaku’s Ethan Gach described Mordhau as a game that’s “slow, awkward, and bloody, but for some reason, I want to keep playing.” That squares pretty well with the majority of Steam reviewers, who love the game’s skill-based melee combat in which you can control the arc of your swings, opening up all sorts of clever strategic possibilities. Mordhau released in a laggy, glitchy state, but many issues have already received fixes, with more on the way. Oh, and there’s versatile customization options that somehow, miraculously, have not been paired with microtransactions or loot boxes. Upon learning this, thousands of Steam users dropped whatever they were doing—some quitting their jobs and abandoning their families—to write reviews.

Source: Kotaku.com

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, As Told By Steam Reviews

SteamedSteamed is dedicated to all things in and around Valve’s PC gaming service.  

“Wait, they only die twice?” said all the literal title interpreters in the Steam community upon seeing Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice’s name. They’ve since been shocked—shocked, I say—to find themselves dying many more times than twice.

Like Kotaku’s own Natalie Degraffinried, Steam reviewers mostly love Sekiro, the latest deliciously murderful brainchild of Dark Souls director Hidetaka Miyazaki and his team, whose sadism comes so clearly through these series that I’m convinced they’d be in jail if they weren’t game designers. Steam reviewers are big fans of the fast-paced combat, stealth-centric encounter design, and setting. They’re also all about the punishing timing-based difficulty—for the most part. A handful of Sekiro’s Steam reviews read like that angry text you sent an ex when you probably just should’ve taken a nap instead. The salt, it flows.

Source: Kotaku.com

Valve Says It Will Remove ‘Off-Topic Review Bombs’ From Steam Scores

SteamedSteamed is dedicated to all things in and around Valve’s PC gaming service.  

Over the past few years, review bombs—people organizing en masse to post negative reviews to a game’s store page to tank its review score—have become one of Steam’s most visible issues. Last year alone, review bombing happened in Steam reviews over everything from women generals to sales that happened too early. Developers have cited this sort of toxicity as a reason they’re excited about the Epic Games Store, which plans to address the issue with an opt-in review system. Today, Valve announced it will take steps to defuse Steam’s review bomb problem.

In a news post, Valve described a series of planned changes to Steam’s review system aimed at minimizing the impact of review bombs. “That change can be described easily,” the statement reads.. “We’re going to identify off-topic review bombs, and remove them from the Review Score.”

Valve says it will do this by using its chart-based review bomb detection system—which previously only served to make review bombs more visible—to identify “anomalous review activity.” At that point, Valve says a team of people will investigate those anomalies, and, if they determine that something fishy is afoot, they’ll “mark the time period it encompasses and notify the developer.” If Valve finds that coordinated review bombing has indeed occurred, any reviews posted during that time period won’t count toward the game’s review score. This will unfortunately include reviews posted from non-nefarious individuals during that time period, though, because it “isn’t feasible for us to read every single review.” According to Valve, however, data has shown that review bombs are “temporary distortions,” so the overall review score will remain accurate even if some well-meaning reviews get caught up in Valve’s net.

It’s unclear whether Valve will be selectively removing reviews left during a review bombing time period, hiding them, or doing nothing at all to them. On one hand, the company says that “the reviews themselves are left untouched—if you want to dig into them to see if they’re relevant to you, you’ll still be able to do so.” But then, one sentence later, the company says, “To help you do that, we’ve made it clear when you’re looking at a store page where we’ve removed some reviews by default, and we’ve further improved the UI around anomalous review periods.” Kotaku has reached out to Valve for clarification on this point, but has not yet heard back.

In the statement, Valve offered examples of subjects that will be deemed “off topic” in the form of DRM and EULA changes. “We had long debates about these two, and others like them,” Valve said. “They’re technically not a part of the game, but they are an issue for some players. In the end, we’ve decided to define them as off-topic review bombs. Our reasoning is that the ‘general’ Steam player doesn’t care as much about them, so the Review Score is more accurate if it doesn’t contain them.” Valve also noted that players will still be able to dig into “removed” reviews if they’re interested in those issues.

On top of that, Steam users will be able to opt out of this new system entirely by using an option that’ll keep review bombs in games’ review scores. And, again, people will apparently still be able to look at reviews that have been removed. Review bombers won’t have as much power to affect games’ standing with the Steam algorithm, but this could also just encourage review bombers to find other ways to evolve their tactics and get through what sounds like some still worryingly large loopholes. Time will tell.

Source: Kotaku.com

Dawn Of Man, As Told By Steam Reviews

SteamedSteamed is dedicated to all things in and around Valve’s PC gaming service.  

Since the dawn of video games—and possibly even the dawn of man—human beings have been creating city-building games. It’s fitting, then, that the latest genre hit is set in prehistoric times and called Dawn of Man. Steam users are loving it.

Dawn of Man came out a week ago and has been one of Steam’s top sellers ever since. In it, you try to shepherd a small civilization of ancient humans through the ages, hunting, gathering, crafting, and researching all the while. You also try not to get mauled by bears or gored by mammoths. Times were tough in the prehistoric days, before we invented medicine, sophisticated agriculture, and also history, and players say they love Dawn of Man because of the satisfying ways in which things can go both right and disastrously wrong. They cite everything from a detailed progression system to murderous cave lions as positives, though some say the game doesn’t have quite enough depth to live up to its ambitious scope.

Source: Kotaku.com