Tag Archives: the legend of zelda breath of the wild

Breath Of The Wild Player Beats Game Using Only Shields, No Weapons

After recently completing a run of Breath of the Wild making use of only bombs and shields, PointCrow went one better over the weekend and finished the game, Calamity Ganon and all, using only shields.

It took around 27 hours in total for him to scrape around the map and get it done, including a final battle that took three hours. Not to mention the couple of months spent before the run spent exploring and working out how to beat certain challenges and overcome certain parts of the game without weapons.

Here’s an abridged version of the run. The Ganon battles are a particular highlight, seeing the weird and wonderful ways PointCrow was able to work out ways to deal damage using… well, only Ganon’s own attacks.

Video: PointCrow

Source: Kotaku.com

A New Bomb Trick Is Blowing Up Breath Of The Wild Speedrunning

The act of finishing a video game as quickly as possible, or speedrunning, is an iterative process that evolves quickly with the contributions of a large community. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild has seen numerous updates to its speedrunning strategies in just two years, and the latest technique has the potential to be a massive step forward for players that gotta go fast.

Until now, Breath of the Wild speedrunning has revolved around two techniques: stasis launching and bullet time bounces, both of which utilize careful movement and physics manipulation to send Link soaring through the sky. The one drawback to these tools, however, is that their specific setups rely on using objects and enemies in the game world that, at times, don’t always cooperate like they should.

A new technique known as “bomb impact launches” opens up additional possibilities for speedy travel. According to Breath of the Wild speedrunner Zant, bomb impact launches were first demonstrated by Twitter user Satougashi020, whose original video showed the technique being used to launch Link into the air and quickly finish a shrine on September 5. After some experimentation, the speedrunning community realized that this trick could be used outside of shrines as well, giving them a powerful new tool to traverse the game’s huge open world.

“Up until this point in Breath of the Wild speedrunning, Link essentially had to rely on third parties to launch him around the world,” Zant explained in his own video. Stasis launching requires that Link find a nearby object, while bullet time bouncing required an enemy character. “But now that Link can simply pull out two bombs and fly across the map, we can take more direct routes than ever before between objectives,” he added.

The most consistent way to perform bomb impact launches is known as the “double backflip method.” First, the player needs to find something a little taller than Link that he can jump off in order to activate the slowdown that occurs when he pulls out his bow in midair. After lining up with the object and doing two backflips for consistent spacing, players then place a square bomb on the ground in front of Link.

Then, while still aiming, players need to walk forward and climb onto the item from which they plan to jump, with the square bomb situated behind them. After backflipping off this object and entering bullet time, players then need to drop a round bomb, timing it precisely so that it drops when the stamina bar is one-third empty.

At this point, quickly swapping to and detonating the square bomb will launch the round bomb, which will be sped up thanks to bullet time manipulation. If everything is done correctly, Link will be shot into the air by the round bomb, allowing him to glide to his next objective.

While bomb impact launches don’t travel the same distance as other tricks, they are much more convenient than both stasis launches and bullet time bounces because Link always has his bombs available for use. Speedrunners that skip directly to Hyrule Castle will likely stick with old techniques for their routes, but there’s definitely a place for bomb impact launches in runs that hit every main quest or complete all the dungeons. Further experimentation by the speedrunning community is sure to come up with tons of uses for this powerful trick.

“I seriously cannot understate the versatility of this trick,” Zant said. “We have more routing freedom than ever with this game, and I seriously can’t wait to see where it goes with speedrunning in the next year or so.”

Source: Kotaku.com

Breath Of The Wild Player Discovers A Ridiculously Easy New Way To Catch Fish

Want to gather a whole lot of delicious virtual fish in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild with very little effort? Redditor Charlieboy95 discovered that all you have to do to force fish ashore is purse your lips and blow.

It’s like whistling while you work, only whistling is the work. In a video posted to Reddit (via Destructoid), Charlieboy95 demonstrates the whistle fishing technique. It’s performed by floating near a beach or riverbank and using the game’s whistle command, normally reserved for calling a trusty steed. The noise of the whistle causes fish to swim away and beach themselves for easy retrieval.

Look at all of those fish!

According to Charlieboy95, the trick only works in areas where the water gently meets the land, with the banks of some lakes being too high for the fish to make the transition. According to several other posters in the thread, whistle fishing is awesome and is almost as fun as bomb fishing.

Source: Kotaku.com

Link Becomes Expert Rock Climber

Today on Highlight Reel we have Batman animations, Apex finishes, rock climbing, and much more!

Watch the video then talk about your favorite highlight in the comments below. Be sure to check out, like, and share the original videos via the links below. Subscribe to Kotaku on YouTube for more! Catch up on all the episodes on the Highlight Reel Youtube playlist!

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Programming note: I’m going on vacation! Here’s the schedule.

  • September 2-6: No show
  • September 9-13: One episode sometime in the week, probably on the 11th
  • September 16-20th: returning to normal, might be a day behind on the monday episode.

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Highlight Reel is Kotaku’s regular roundup of great plays, stunts, records and other great moments from around the gaming world. If you record an amazing feat while playing a game (here’s how to record a clip), send it to us with a message confirming that the clip is yours at [email protected] Or, if you see a great clip around that isn’t yours, encourage that person to send it in!

Source: Kotaku.com

I Played Breath of the Wild With My Sister And Put Her Through Hell

It’s not often I replay games, but when my sister asked for something to play together, I suggested The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. More than two years had passed since I completed Link’s adventure on my own, and I wanted her to experience it ahead of the recently-announced sequel. Let me recount all the ways I led her astray during her adventures in Hyrule.

I enjoyed my second Breath of the Wild adventure more than my first. It’s probably more accurate to say that I enjoyed it in different ways. The first time I played the Nintendo Switch’s 2017 game, and experienced all the strange and wonderful secrets Hyrule had to offer, it was eye-opening. This time with my sister, and armed with pre-knowledge of all to expect, I got to watch someone else be enthralled and listen to differing opinions on certain aspects of the game. It was interesting observing her approaches to tackling Hyrule’s various locations (even if I may have influenced her play-style somewhat, in some instances).

I had forgotten so many little details and saw new ones I had previously missed. I can truly say that I came away with a deeper appreciation of the game’s world by the time we were done. But most importantly, I got to watch my sister’s priceless reactions to some of the game’s weirder moments—some of them I willfully led her to find.

My sister and I have an excellent relationship. We rarely fight or have any sort of sibling rivalry. However, when I was presented with the opportunity to have a little fun at her expense in Breath of the Wild, I took it.

I’m not a terrible person. I just really enjoyed getting the controller thrown at me, sometimes.

Keeping Secrets

It’s not often my sister plays games on her own, and she especially dislikes the combat aspect to most of them. Exploring and building in games such as Dragon Quest Builders, Harvest Moon and Stardew Valley are more her speed. This means I’m usually the one to fight most of the battles whenever we play adventure games together. In Breath of the Wild, it was no different. She did have the occasional laugh at setting bokoblins on fire from afar or shooting arrows at Octoroks.

For my part, I mostly kept quiet on all the things she’d find as she wandered across Hyrule. I didn’t want her experience to be ruined by spoilers, and initially, I believed I was being kind. And I was! My intentions were good, I swear. But eventually, as we played through the early stages and I began to recall my adventures, I knew she’d start experiencing some dreadfully shocking things, which included lots of battles with Calamity Ganon’s forces.

And so, my secret keeping turned to wicked joy when I realized what was in store for her, and I looked forward to how she would react.

During my solo playthrough, the first time I had run into a blood moon—the game’s way of respawning enemies—I was safely indoors at a horse stable. My sister was less fortunate. “Keep going towards the field,” I told her, as I heard the all too familiar change in music whenever a blood moon approaches. Granted, she was in no real danger when her first blood moon eventually arrived but she panicked and quickly handed me the controller. It was a glorious moment.

The controller hand-off happened a few times during her journey. My sister would happily be exploring some corner of Hyrule and unwittingly stumble upon a sleeping cyclops, the Hinox, or one of those Wizzrobe jerks (after dealing with those spell-casting wizards for a second playthrough, I can truly say these enemies are some of my most hated). Inactive Guardians suddenly springing to life stressed her out every single time, and I may have smirked in each instance. To be fair, I was also nervous during my solo playthrough of Breath of Wild whenever those huge, deadly mechanical monsters came to life, too.

Quietly watching her fall into dangerous situations (and sometimes, actively encouraging her to explore perilous places) never got old during our 140 hours with Breath of the Wild.

My sister trusted me so much, at first, that when I asked her to stick to the roads in the early hours of the game, she did so without question. Was she happy when she believed she was talking to a hapless traveler but instead incurred the wrath of the Yiga—the clan hellbent on killing Link—in disguise? No, she was not. But was I? Yes, very much so.

Eventually, my secret keeping tactics failed me. She clued into my tricks when she noticed I sat up straight as we headed into the desert to find shrines. Having played the game before, I picked up on clues a lot faster. An open area surrounded by small rocks or ledges? That’s territory belonging to the terrifying sand monster, the molduga. I couldn’t pull a fast one on her as we approached the area because she saw my reaction. Curses.

We Saw So Many Strange Things (And I Got Yelled At Lots)

I didn’t just lead her into danger, I also withheld quest information from her. This led her to give me some vicious side-eye for dealing with some of Hyrule’s most horrible residents. I’ve discussed some of these awful characters before, so it was fun for me to see how she’d react in turn. Of course, in some cases, this backfired on me.

When I told her to go investigate the “fairy fountain” knowing full well that the Horse God, a scary deity, lived there, she was aptly terrified when she met him. But then she made me go collect 1000 rupees to recover the cost of activating the Horse God’s services. It was worth it and a small price to pay in exchange for watching her get mad at losing her hard-earned rupees.

Once she had finished her Tarrey Town quest, I asked her to go back to pick up some additional ones. I encouraged her to complete the Monster Cake quest with Hunnie, and the subsequent Guardian quest with Hagie. Her response to Hagie’s awful privileged request—making Link fight Guardians for his viewing pleasure like a sport—was so good. My sister vowed to burn the town down that she had so happily built hours before. It’s those moments I’ll cherish forever.

Had I not played the game once more, I also would not have seen the most curious glitch we came upon late one night. It happened some time after we had killed Master Kohga, the leader of the Yiga clan, and I had her on the hunt for rupees, Yiga weapons, and mighty bananas. By then, she had already yelled at me after realizing the increased frequency of Yiga attacks if we were too close to the roads. What we were not expecting was seeing one of the NPC traders—the ones who travel with donkeys—acting strangely on the path near Kakariko village:

It happened again at a different village, too. My sister felt very sorry them.

These are some of the best memories I’ll carry with me in life, made all the better by having my sister there to see them unfold in real time.

Adventuring Together Is Always Worth The Time

Experiencing Breath of the Wild a second time was fantastic. It wasn’t just that I got to play a little devil at times with my sister (and that certainly was some of the fun) but I also got to another chance to spend quality time with her. It’s nice to just relax, be chased by Guardians, and laugh at all the stupid things we saw and did.

As we get older, I’m constantly thinking about ways to spend time with my family, and sharing my interests with them. Whether it’s God of War with my Dad or scowling at my sister for her wishing that a fearsome lynel would bust me in face in Breath of the Wild, I’m happy we’re afforded the time to do so. I play a lot of single-player games, and sometimes, I forget that sharing the experience with my loved ones for firsthand accounts—even if it means passing the controller back and forth—is much better than relaying my excitement about something cool that happened in a game through mere discussions.

As an aside, even though I was not the nicest to my sister during her playthrough of Breath of the Wild, don’t worry about her. She absolutely creates more beautiful living spaces in Dragon Quest Builders 2 than I do, and she has been shoving it in my face at every opportunity. I got my comeuppance.


Do you have fun multiplayer experiences to share with siblings, friends and family? I’d love to hear them.

All images via screenshot on Nintendo Switch.

Source: Kotaku.com

Video Game Characters Are Terrible At Archery

Screenshot: Sony

Video game characters love their bows and arrows, but I hate to be the bearer of bad news—almost all of them are terrible at archery. As an archer myself, I’ve had to spend a lot of time teaching and observing the sport, so I thought it might be appropriate to explain why, in real life, some of your favorite arrow-shooting characters at best wouldn’t be able to shoot straight and at worst would severely injure themselves.

Link, Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Illustration: Nintendo

One of the cardinal sins of archery is dry-firing a bow. A dry fire is the process of drawing the bow’s string back and then letting go without an arrow in place. A normal bow draws back to a conservative estimate of 30 to 40 pounds of tension created by the bending of the bow. As such you’re holding those pounds on your fingers. If you let that go without an arrow on it, all that energy comes rushing back into the bow, which could potentially shatter its limbs (the long ends of the bow), break the string, and/or make a god-awful sound. Think a tiny thunder roll in your hand. In rare cases, this could become dangerous to the archer, especially if the string snaps near the face, but more likely would it vibrate your arm and be more harmful to your bank account.

Whenever Link runs out of arrows, he pulls back his bowstring anyway. In the game, doing this is pretty useful to scope out enemies and such, but once he’s finished, Link just lets go of the string. Knowing how delicate weapons are in Breath of the Wild, this is a bad idea. What we see in the game as a cute little “ping” would be a disaster in real life; if your bow didn’t break, you’d have to spend the next 30 minutes checking for signs of damage. Life lesson: If you need to observe something, just use the Sheikah Slate.

Screenshot: Rockstar

Arthur Morgan, Red Dead Redemption 2

If you’ve ever tried archery, you know it’s not easy. In fact, you’d be surprised at how incredibly difficult the sport is. In Red Dead Redemption 2, poor Arthur Morgan is handed a longbow and told to hunt deer with it. Not only is Arthur a complete beginner, but generally speaking, longbows are the hardest bows to consistently aim at a stationary target, let alone a frolicking one.

As a novice, there is no way Arthur would be able to shoot a deer in the head from more than 15 meters away. His release is also trash. He splays out his hand and shoots his shoulder and elbow far back enough to knock out any comrades nearby. All in all, Arthur Morgan, the beefiest character on the list, should stick to two other types of shots: the bullet kind, and the ones he takes with Lenny.

Screenshot: Sony

Aloy, Horizon: Zero Dawn 

Game developers love to make a character look and feel good. Often, to get a point across, you might see an exaggeration of visual features that are important to a character. For Aloy, this is her fletchings. Fletchings, or vanes, are the feathers or plastic things you see on the end of the arrow, designed to help your glorified stick fly more predictably through the air. They’re really useful and pretty important when it comes to archery, but Aloy’s are ridiculously oversized. If you were to have fletchings that big, your arrows would be more unpredictable, as they would ricochet off the bow to the left. Or every arrow’s fletchings would be ruined, and your arrow damaged. Aloy, we get that you’re an archer—just tone down the feathers, okay?

Pit, Kid Icarus: Uprising

Photo: Nintendo

Pit’s bow is gorgeous but comically impractical. Made out of two swords jointed at the hilt, it is the most dangerous bow on this list, and not for the right reasons. Bows aren’t nearly as elegant as you might assume. Carry a lightweight object that’s close to your own height in just one hand, and accidents are bound to happen. I don’t know of any archer who hasn’t accidentally bumped someone else or themselves with their bow, and when your bow is made out of two menacing blades, the outcome could be gory.

Another labored part of archery is loading an arrow onto the bow. In every game, show or movie, loading a bow seems swift and beautiful, but in reality it is quite fiddly. You’d need to check the orientation of the arrow was correct before “nocking” or fixing the arrow to the string, all of which takes at least a couple seconds. Orientation of the arrow matters because otherwise the arrow’s fletchings will graze the rest of the bow, compromising its flight path.

When nocking an arrow, you’d also have the bow down by your leg. I actually rest mine on my thigh to hold it steady. Even if an archer were to hold the bow away from their body when loading an arrow, bringing their arm up to shoot would mean swinging a blade past their leg to aim. Pit loading an arrow in a flurry of movement without nocking the arrow wrong or slicing himself is improbable at best, and a quick amputation at worst.

Screenshot: Blizzard

Hanzo, Overwatch

Hanzo is a really difficult character to critique, because if you’ve ever played Overwatch, you know his third- and first-person techniques are completely different. In third-person, Hanzo holds the bow upright; in first-person he holds it sideways. Holding a bow sideways deeply limits the draw length of the bow because your body is in the way. You can only pull back as far as your torso is away from the bow, whereas holding it upright means you can pull back to your face or further. It’s also hazardous to your arm’s health. I once met a girl who tried shooting sideways, who proceeded to show me a photo of the damage she did to her arm. It wasn’t pretty, and I’m sure Hanzo’s arm wouldn’t be either.

Normally, another issue that I would have with Hanzo would be the lack of an anchor point, which is a specific place on your body you “anchor” your hand to in every shot for consistency. Anchor points are important for any archery that doesn’t require a sight, because it helps an archer reference to where they should pull back. In Hanzo’s style of modern barebow, the anchor point will often will be on the face—you’d use a finger to touch the corner of your mouth, or a tooth.

However, I cannot fault Hanzo for his lack of an anchor point, because Hanzo is Japanese, and the Japanese have a particular version of archery called kyūdō. It’s an art form, really, and those that perform it have a different way of achieving accuracy, basically relying on dedicated practice. The masters of kyūdō don’t rely on a physical anchor point as most archers do; they pull the string back to somewhere near the face and let loose.

I’ll give Hanzo the benefit of the doubt and say he’s a kyūdō master. But what I can’t forgive is the weight of his bow. Hanzo grits his teeth and shakes like he’s experiencing an earthquake every time he shoots. This indicates that he is way too weak to be handling his bow, especially if he were trying to shoot high-quality arrows on a battlefield. You’d get really tired really quickly, and your aim would be affected by a lack of stability—not to mention the backache you’d feel the next day. Fixes include getting a new bow or going to the gym, so unless Hanzo wants to trade in his weapon, he might need a few protein shakes here and there.

Screenshot: Sony

Ellie, The Last of Us

Every other character on this list should be ashamed for being shown up by a 14-year-old. Ellie is the most realistic archer in any of the games on this list. Every shot looks almost exactly the same. She is consistent and precise. The further away you aim, the more the arrow drops on the way there. Arrows break, which they would in real life if you hit bone.

Ellie is no doubt the best. My only gripe with her is the back quiver, where she stores her arrows. I understand that Ellie might not have the time to find a better solution, but in general, back quivers are pretty stupid. You can’t see the arrows, for one, so if you were in a combat situation, every time you wanted to fire, you would have to reach back, maybe stab your hand on the end of an arrow, fiddle around to find an arrow, pull it out at a really awkward angle, and then shoot it. Not to mention the fact that you might not notice if you didn’t have any arrows left.

Back quivers also make collecting arrows an issue, because trying to place a stick in a pocket on your back is hard. How about when you’re trying to be stealthy? When you bend down, it’s very likely they would just slide out, clatter to the ground, and hey presto, Ellie would be dead. It would be a shame, too, as she would do well in an archery competition.

Ellie could instead use a field quiver, which goes around the waist and often has a lot of room for tools. Field quivers are unfortunately quite loud when it comes to movement, since arrows tend to rattle when loose, so my recommendation for Ellie would be a bow quiver. It’s an attachment to your bow to hold your arrows directly on the “riser” (the handle) in a fixed position. Advantages include no clattering of arrows, easy access to arrows, and a constant visual of ammunition—not to mention making the bow look a lot more impressive.

Screenshot: Kotaku (Square Enix)

Lara Croft, Rise of the Tomb Raider

Gaming’s legendary heroine is also the pinnacle of bad video game archery. Rise of the Tomb Raider smushes so many mistakes into this one gameplay mechanic that you’re going to need to buckle up, because I can’t hold back.

Lara Croft, explorer extraordinaire, has to do a lot of sneaking around to find the very best a tomb may have to offer, as well as killing a couple of unfortunate souls on the way, and a compound bow is often her weapon of choice to get the job done. Up until now, most bows we’ve seen on this list are simply a stick and some string. Compounds are the more complex, more technical younger brother of the traditional bow. They require a complicated mixture of “cables” (string) and “cams” (rotating discs that the cables sit on), from which they get the name “compound.” They’re faster and more accurate.

A compound bow has a couple other crucial advantages that make it an accurate and deadly weapon. The biggest thing is that its draw length, the distance between the bow and the string when it’s pulled back to the face, is specific to the archer using it. It’s basically custom-fit. Once you get it back to that draw length you can’t pull it back further without damaging the bow or compromising yourself.

The problem Lara displays is something you can demonstrate to yourself with a little audience participation. If you put your left arm straight out to the side, and your right hand by your chin/jawline, the distance between those two places is about what your draw length should be. That is indeed the distance Lara’s bow comes back to. Now put that right hand by your left armpit. That’s a significantly shorter distance, right? Well, when Lara crouches down, the string goes straight through her armpit to make up for this distance issue.

Ow.
Screenshot: Kotaku (Square Enix)

The draw length being specific means you also shouldn’t draw short. The way a compound is designed means there’s an arc of “weight” to the bowstring. It’s really light when you start drawing, then gets really difficult to pull back, but becomes light again when you reach your draw length. Drawing about halfway, which Lara often does, means that holding the bow would be an incredible struggle, if not incredibly stupid. The accuracy of the shot would decrease—not to mention the fact that Lara’s arm gets in the way of the string.

This isn’t even the biggest issue I have with Lara’s shot, because Lara has a sight on her bow that she doesn’t use. When standing with the bow upright, she pulls it to the side of her face, looking down the length of the arrow to aim. That’s not necessary, and is less accurate, when you have a sight on the bow. When Lara crouches, the sight is oriented sideways, so she actually can’t see down it.

Her bow itself has another problem. There are arrow rests that can hold an arrow in place no matter what the orientation of the bow is, but Lara’s bow doesn’t have those, meaning that arrows should be falling right off of her bow in many situations. And yes, she even uses a back quiver. Ultimately, our Tomb Raider would be the worst character on this list emulate if you were going to pick up a bow.

I know that many people don’t care how accurate archery is in video games, but as an archer, this has been therapeutic for me. We’re always on the lookout to see how accurately our sport is represented in games, and are often disappointed. All I can really end this on is asking you to go out and try archery for yourselves. It’s a fantastic sport, especially if you hate running. Please, however, listen to archers when they tell you not to try the version of archery you see in games. You’d likely hurt our pride—as well as your body.

Calypso Mellor is a freelance journalist with a passion for point-and-clicks, piano, and puns. You can often find her in a field shooting a target from fairly far away, or alternatively on Twitter @imomellor.

Source: Kotaku.com

Meet The Pixel Artist Recreating Breath of The Wild Scenes In 8-Bit

Image: ncxaesthetic

On Tuesday, Instagram user ncxaesthetic began uploading a series of “screenshots” in which he took iconic scenes from The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and rendered them in the 8-bit pixel art style of the Game Boy Color Zelda games like Link’s Awakening DX. Here, for example, is a scene from early in the game, where Link meets the “Old Man” shortly after awakening at the start.

Dig back further into ncxaesthetic’s profile, and you’ll see he’s been working at this for a while, remaking scenes from almost every 3D Zelda in the style of the 2D Game Boy entries.

Turns out ncxaesthetic—also known as Nate, 20—began making these pieces as a way to get better at something he loved doing: making pixel art.

“Around January of this year, I was replaying Link’s Awakening DX on my 3DS and out of nowhere I just thought to myself, I wonder if anyone has drawn up the bosses from the 3D Zelda games in a 2D format?” Nate wrote to me via email. “So I did some digging around and much to my disappointment, I found none.”

So Nate decided to do it himself. He started with Gohma, the first boss from The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, and began using a 7-year-old laptop with a cracked screen and an old copy of Photoshop CS6. Soon, he had fashioned every Wind Waker boss in pixel art.

“I found that project very fun to complete,” Nate said, “so I just continued making content from there and now here we are.”

Nate began making pixel art four years ago. He had been on his way to a convention and planned to attend a signing by one of his favorite actors from The Walking Dead. As a gift, he had brought a pixel-art representation of the character.

“The artwork was absolutely terrible and I give him props to this day for acting like it was good,” Nate says. “It truly showed me how talented of a performer he is.”

It took Nate two years before he returned to pixel art, recreating scenes the iconic finale of The Walking Dead’s sixth season and its seventh-season premiere with Mega Man sprites.

Image: ncxaesthetic

“At a certain point I realized I really did enjoy making pixel art, however I was still terrible at it and that bothered me,” Nate says. “I told myself I’d make at least one pixel artwork per day as a way to keep practicing and keep getting better, so that’s what I did. I took a few breaks here and there, but currently I’m on almost a nine-month streak of making pixel art every single day.”

Thus Nate began working his way through 3D Zelda games. It’s a task that he says is much harder than it looks. He walked me through how he translated the entrance of the Forest Temple in Ocarina of Time into 2D.

“My first step was to take a look at the room from the original game and to see the basic layout of everything. The entrance lies south, a door to the north, two dead trees symmetrical to each other on both sides of the room and a climbable wall to the right that provides access to a chest and key. The Game Boy Color is a very limited system, so my biggest challenge here is to figure out how to incorporate that climbable wall into my piece. I save that for last because it helps me to visualize things better when I have something to look at; so I create the room, add the trees, the door, and the entrance. To add some extra flair to the room I add symmetrical pillars to either side of the north door. Now I approach that challenge I mentioned earlier. In Link’s Awakening, Oracle of Seasons, and Oracle of Ages, there are two ways to create “height” in a dungeon: either by adding an interactive staircase texture leading up to a whole other floor or by adding a plain staircase texture paired with a wall below which takes up quite a lot of room on the screen. The latter isn’t an option given the size constraints of the room, so I opted for the interactive staircase as my method of translating the climbable wall into a 2D format.”

To Nate, the placement of different objects and textures on the limited amount of space you have when recreating a Game Boy screen is a challenge akin to a good puzzle game, one that he says is only enhanced by the limitations of his old equipment.

“The crack near the middle of my screen slowly grows larger week by week, however I find it humbling in an odd way. There is a common notion that to make decent content you need decent tools. However, here I am making content with a less-than-decent piece of hardware that even sometimes gets in the way of me trying to work,” he says. “It’s almost poetic—a reminder that anyone with a creative mind can still create no matter the quality of the tools they work with.”

Source: Kotaku.com

Meet The Pixel Artist Recreating Breath of The Wild Scenes In 8-Bit

Image: ncxaesthetic

On Tuesday, Instagram user ncxaesthetic began uploading a series of “screenshots” in which he took iconic scenes from The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and rendered them in the 8-bit pixel art style of the Game Boy Color Zelda games like Link’s Awakening DX. Here, for example, is a scene from early in the game, where Link meets the “Old Man” shortly after awakening at the start.

Dig back further into ncxaesthetic’s profile, and you’ll see he’s been working at this for a while, remaking scenes from almost every 3D Zelda in the style of the 2D Game Boy entries.

Turns out ncxaesthetic—also known as Nate, 20—began making these pieces as a way to get better at something he loved doing: making pixel art.

“Around January of this year, I was replaying Link’s Awakening DX on my 3DS and out of nowhere I just thought to myself, I wonder if anyone has drawn up the bosses from the 3D Zelda games in a 2D format?” Nate wrote to me via email. “So I did some digging around and much to my disappointment, I found none.”

So Nate decided to do it himself. He started with Gohma, the first boss from The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, and began using a 7-year-old laptop with a cracked screen and an old copy of Photoshop CS6. Soon, he had fashioned every Wind Waker boss in pixel art.

“I found that project very fun to complete,” Nate said, “so I just continued making content from there and now here we are.”

Nate began making pixel art four years ago. He had been on his way to a convention and planned to attend a signing by one of his favorite actors from The Walking Dead. As a gift, he had brought a pixel-art representation of the character.

“The artwork was absolutely terrible and I give him props to this day for acting like it was good,” Nate says. “It truly showed me how talented of a performer he is.”

It took Nate two years before he returned to pixel art, recreating scenes the iconic finale of The Walking Dead’s sixth season and its seventh-season premiere with Mega Man sprites.

Image: ncxaesthetic

“At a certain point I realized I really did enjoy making pixel art, however I was still terrible at it and that bothered me,” Nate says. “I told myself I’d make at least one pixel artwork per day as a way to keep practicing and keep getting better, so that’s what I did. I took a few breaks here and there, but currently I’m on almost a nine-month streak of making pixel art every single day.”

Thus Nate began working his way through 3D Zelda games. It’s a task that he says is much harder than it looks. He walked me through how he translated the entrance of the Forest Temple in Ocarina of Time into 2D.

“My first step was to take a look at the room from the original game and to see the basic layout of everything. The entrance lies south, a door to the north, two dead trees symmetrical to each other on both sides of the room and a climbable wall to the right that provides access to a chest and key. The Game Boy Color is a very limited system, so my biggest challenge here is to figure out how to incorporate that climbable wall into my piece. I save that for last because it helps me to visualize things better when I have something to look at; so I create the room, add the trees, the door, and the entrance. To add some extra flair to the room I add symmetrical pillars to either side of the north door. Now I approach that challenge I mentioned earlier. In Link’s Awakening, Oracle of Seasons, and Oracle of Ages, there are two ways to create “height” in a dungeon: either by adding an interactive staircase texture leading up to a whole other floor or by adding a plain staircase texture paired with a wall below which takes up quite a lot of room on the screen. The latter isn’t an option given the size constraints of the room, so I opted for the interactive staircase as my method of translating the climbable wall into a 2D format.”

To Nate, the placement of different objects and textures on the limited amount of space you have when recreating a Game Boy screen is a challenge akin to a good puzzle game, one that he says is only enhanced by the limitations of his old equipment.

“The crack near the middle of my screen slowly grows larger week by week, however I find it humbling in an odd way. There is a common notion that to make decent content you need decent tools. However, here I am making content with a less-than-decent piece of hardware that even sometimes gets in the way of me trying to work,” he says. “It’s almost poetic—a reminder that anyone with a creative mind can still create no matter the quality of the tools they work with.”

Source: Kotaku.com

Some Hilarious Zelda Talk I Overheard At The Rock Climbing Gym

Kotaku Game DiaryDaily thoughts from a Kotaku staffer about a game we’re playing.  

When your job involves talking about video games all day, you get pretty attuned to hearing people mention them when you’re outside of work. While eavesdropping can be a way to learn what games people are playing and thinking about, it can also provide neat insight into how those games fit into their lives.

I’ve just gotten into rock climbing, and on Saturday night I went to the climbing gym near my house. I’ve been on a somewhat maddening hiatus for a few weeks because I’d hurt myself, and even though I told myself to take it easy on Saturday, I was so excited to be back at my new hobby that I was throwing myself at challenging bouldering routes in no time.

Before I started climbing, I didn’t know how psychological the sport is—it’s as much about solving a little puzzle as it is physical strength. Routes have a “crux,” a part where they get particularly tricky. I was stuck on one route’s crux, hanging horizontally while trying to figure out how to haul my far-too-spread body around a sort of corner and get back to vertical, when I heard some people near me talking. They were not talking about rock climbing.

“So you have to find these little, like, leaf guys,” one person was saying to the others, “and they kind of laugh?”

“They pop up when you find stuff,” another explained. “And they go, like, how does it go?..” He made a loud, high-pitched laugh.

I realized they were talking about The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, in particular the Korok seeds you can find scattered around the game’s map. When you find one, a Korok—a weird little monster with a leaf face—pops up and makes a very distinct cackle.

I tried to concentrate on my climbing, but the little group was determined to exactly emulate to their friend how the Koroks laugh.

“It’s, like, ‘yahoo!’” one said, sounding more like Mario than a Korok.

“No,” the other corrected, “like ‘yo-ho-ho!’”

“Yahaha!”

“Right! Yahaha!” They both made the sound together eagerly.

Their imitation was so spot-on, and they were so delighted to have figured it out, that I started laughing. This was, of course, not that helpful for climbing. I promptly fell off my perch and dropped to the mat below.

I never quite know what to do when I hear people talking about video games in public. Once, I overheard someone trying to remember the release date of a video game and tried to help, only to get into an argument about it. They kept insisting on the wrong date, and I kept insisting on the right one—I knew I was right in part because I used to be in charge of keeping Kotaku’s game release calendar and had entered the correct date myself that day—but they wouldn’t believe me. In a less-than-noble moment, I finally said, “Look, I work at Kotaku, and I know I’m right.” They continued not to believe me, and I’m sure thought I was a pretentious jerk.

Recently, I was riding the subway when two teenagers near me were talking about Fortnite. One of them was trying to explain a building move called 90s to the other, but they couldn’t quite describe it. They kept challenging each other:

You don’t know what 90s are!”

“Yes I do!”

“OK, explain it then.”

You explain it!”

I wondered if I should help, but I didn’t want to be some strange adult popping into two kids’ conversation about video games. (I will also admit that, in the moment, I couldn’t quite explain what 90s are either.)

In these moments, I put pressure on myself to be an expert. When people find out what I do for work, they often want game recommendations, which can be hard to offer a stranger. Sometimes they tell me fascinating things about games they love—I met an older man at a bar once who proudly told me he only owns five games, mostly Souls games, and he’s going to play them forever. We talked about how excited he was for Sekiro, and he knew way more about the then-upcoming game than I did. It was cool to get excited for something through the experience of a player instead of through the internet or my professional colleagues.

I don’t know why those people at the gym were thinking about Breath of the Wild instead of rock climbing, but it was a fun distraction. It was cool to learn that other people at the gym share more of my hobbies than just climbing. I didn’t manage to complete the climbing problem I was working on that night, but now I’m going to think of Zelda whenever I try. 

Source: Kotaku.com

Breath Of The Wild Players Discover An Infinite Jump Glitch

A new glitch in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is setting off a flurry of testing and exploration from speedrunners and glitch hunters. The complicated trick allows Link to jump infinitely, making it possible to explore the upward bounds of Hyrule and completely skip shrine puzzles.

Exploration and experiments with the new trick, tentatively dubbed “moonwalking” by some speedrunners, started after Japanese Twitter account @HyruleDojo posted a clip of Link leaping high into the air with a series of jumps. The discovery of the glitch is attributed to a player called Melissist. Since then, glitch hunters have been testing the glitch to learn more about it. Triggering the glitch actually involves a sequence of highly specific tricks. While this makes the glitch somewhat difficult for casual play, it’s a potentially powerful tool for speedrunning.

To perform the moonwalk glitch, players must first complete two other glitches. The first is known as “Hold Smuggling,” a trick that allows Link to hold items anywhere in the game world. For instance, it becomes possible to hold items while riding a horse or while in a shop’s menu. This trick involves dropping an item, taking damage from a bomb or jelly, and teleporting at precisely the right time. The process is laid out in this tutorial by Kleric, who discovered the glitch in late 2018. Hold Smuggling is required for another trick called “Walk on Horse,” which itself is needed to trigger the moonwalking glitch. Walk on Horse involves triggering Hold Smuggling, attempting to mount a horse while triggering a text box such as the ones that pop up when finding a new item, and pausing the game to hold an item. This allows Link to mount his horse and stand on it. To trigger moonwalking from this point, you the player needs to either kill the horse or warp off it. If they do the former, they must also pull out Link’s paraglider, and then use a menuing trick that’s typically used to cancel fall damage. This complicated setup process puts Link into a state where he can jump nearly infinitely. This state persists through warps and load screens, making it possible to explore the world or enter shrines while keeping the ability to jump through the air. As of writing, it seems that the only way to cancel this state is to mount a horse.

The lengthy nature of this set up, which requires grabbing multiple items and having a horse, means that moonwalking might not have a role in every speedrun. The Any% speedrun, in which runners seek to clear the game as fast as possible, could very well ignore the trick entirely. But moonwalking opens up a great deal of possibility for beating individual Sheikah Shrines quickly or skipping sections of dungeons, as this video from Twitch streamer and Breath of the Wild speedrunner Orcastraw shows:

Breath of the Wild speedrunning has rapidly changed over the last two years thanks to a variety of major glitch discoveries, including the “Bullet-Time Bounce,” which allows runners to launch across huge distances at high speed by precisely shield-jumping on an enemy. The specifics of moonwalking are still unclear, and more is bound to be discovered. However, the trick already holds promise, and we might get to enjoy playthroughs that involving a flying, probably half-naked Link.

Source: Kotaku.com