Tag Archives: world of warcraft

World of Warcraft Classic Reunites Players Who Haven’t Seen Each Other In A Decade

World of Warcraft has its stalwarts, players who’ve been around since the good ol’ days of Onyxia and Ragnaros. It also has its transients. Maybe they were diehard players for a couple years in high school. Maybe they were living that sweet bachelor life. For whatever reason, they left. Now, thanks to the recent release of WoW Classic, many of them are back and reuniting with old friends.

The promise of WoW Classic, which came out on August 26, was not merely a return to gameplay systems and settings from the expansion-free “vanilla” iteration of WoW; it was an attempt to recreate the feeling of the community at the time. Modern World of Warcraft streamlines dungeon-running, raiding, and PVP, but back in 2006, the time period that WoW Classic recreates, players had much more direct interaction. More organic conversations spurred by a need to group up, more chance meetings between strangers destined to become lifelong friends, more getting backstabbed in the jungles of Stranglethorn Valve by rogues who didn’t have anything better to do at the time. Let’s not rewrite history here: Compared to earlier MMOs, WoW has always been a rigidly designed theme park first and a living, breathing world second. But in the vanilla days, many players argue, it felt a little more alive.

This feeling has brought back lapsed players in droves, and many WoW players have been surprised to find that old bonds between pals—the chains rusted thanks to 10 or 15 years of neglect—still hold up.

Chris Price, a player who started a Discord for more than 300 old WoW friends, was worried about possible drama flare ups at first, but has been relieved to find that, so far, everybody’s getting along.

“At first I thought there would be some awkwardness and friction because, let’s be honest, not everyone was on good terms back then,” Price told Kotaku in an email. “Some people rubbed other people the wrong way, old drama, etc. But I’m surprised to see that most people put all of that behind them and have met each other with open arms.”

One thing that might help: Everybody’s grown up now, where many of them were teenagers back in the day. “We often joke about a lot of the drama back then, laughing at how ridiculous things were now that we’re all older and have a bit of perspective,” said Price.

Of course, there are also drawbacks to the maturity that accompanies the unceasing march of time—namely, people now have less time for the game that once consumed most of their waking hours.

“The group I played with back then were full of hardcore raiders,” Price said. “A lot of us were doing server-first raid content with our respective guilds and hitting Grand Marshal/High Warlord and PVPing for 20+ hours a day to do so. Now we’re older and we don’t have that much time. Most people haven’t even hit [level] 60 yet, barring a few outliers (myself included). Even those that have hit it are reluctant to hit up the raiding circuit again because we’ve ‘been there, done that’ and are more in-tune with the social aspect that the game offers.”

Perhaps, though, it’s for the best, said Price. “We often joke about doing the Marshal/Warlord [PVP rank] grind again and usually just laugh off how much time we’d probably have to sink into the game to be able to achieve it, and how little time we all have now that most of us have full-time jobs, families, and kids.”

Another player, who goes by the handle Kroguardious, mourns the old days in which he and his friends used to get together in real life and host late-night LAN parties, but says that WoW Classic has allowed them to split the difference between their raucous, sleep-deprived high school marathons and their more complicated adult lives.

“Now we’re all moved out of our parents’ places and in our own apartments, and all but one of us are cemented in our career fields,” he said in a Twitter DM. “We all moved apart, and our computers have all gotten much bigger, so dragging everything to one spot for a LAN party like we used to is not going to happen. Having an online way to reconnect has been perfect, and its something we all had ties to, as our interests have grown apart slightly over the years and we haven’t all been able to get into and enjoy the same game since we left WoW.”

WoW Classic has allowed some players to rekindle even closer connections. Dusty Braddish, who was 14 when he first started playing World of Warcraft in the vanilla days, has reconnected with someone who he says was like a father to him. At the time, Braddish’s parents had just gotten divorced, and he was going through “a not-so-ideal living situation in the real world.” His mom was suffering from depression, he didn’t get along with his stepdad, and his father, who he loved dearly, was suddenly no longer consistently in his life, he says. His guild master, who was older, gave him a shoulder to lean on.

“My GM had had some life experiences that my father hadn’t that I think prove useful when being a mentor/meaningful figure for a young man,” Braddish told Kotaku in an email. “He had experiences with many groups of people and always treated everyone as equals without hesitation, and showed that you can be serious/professional while still being silly… My GM was the shining example of how to lead in the creation of a warm and welcoming environment.”

Braddish said his guild master mentored and encouraged him, letting him lead raids and organize guild activities “despite knowing I was quite young.” He’d also make sure Braddish got a chance to talk during officer meetings where more brash personalities were dominating. “Considering I went on to become a leader in college/grad school and now in my professional work, I have to think that played a fairly large part in my development and where I am now,” said Braddish.

Now Braddish is playing the game again, and he’s been overjoyed to discover that he and his old guildmates—including his guildmaster—have been able to pick up right where they left off. It’s been an interesting experience for him, given that he now perceives himself as a completely different person.

“I should say nothing has changed in our dynamic within WoW,” Braddish said. “Personally, I am a completely different person these days. I’ve finished high school, gone to college, gone to grad school, and been working in the ‘real world’ for years now. My GM seems to be largely the same, but I would say that’s because he was much older in the vanilla days. Whereas I began playing at 14, he was in his late 20s and already been through his most formative years.”

They’re now making new memories in old haunts, marinating in memories and reforging old bonds. “Oddly enough, many of the new ‘good old times’ are the same as the old ‘good old times’ just because we’re playing the same game as we were back then,” said Braddish. “Running Deadmines and Scarlet Monastery again, getting Dartol’s Rod of Transformation—which turns your character into a furbolg, a sort of ridiculous looking bear—and spamming our warcry while fighting and at the end of battles. It’s just a combination of small moments such as those.”

There is, however, a potential storm cloud hovering over the glow players are currently basking in: This could all be temporary. Many WoW Classic players are now adults with families and other responsibilities, and even if that wasn’t the case, WoW Classic itself is finite. Eventually, everyone will hit level 60 again, or raid until they have all the best possible gear. Some haven’t even stuck around long enough to reach the top of that proverbial mountain.

A player who goes by the handle “WestEschaton” told Kotaku that his old friends only messed around in WoW Classic for a couple weeks. Then they bounced. For all of vanilla WoW’s strengths, its grind often nosedived straight into tedium territory. The same is true of WoW Classic.

“In a couple of cases, the fond nostalgia of leveling in vanilla was replaced by the frustration of killing five dozen goretusks to get eight livers,” WestEschaton said in a Twitter DM. “I think that mostly [my friends] wanted to come back for a couple of weeks and just see how it went.”

WestEschaton said he thinks that even though WoW Classic is like stepping into a time machine, the environment, community, and culture surrounding it is still very much a product of 2019—not 2004. WoW Classic’s plains and wastelands are well-charted territory at this point, with countless guides available via Google and YouTube, and many WoW Classic players pre-formed their own guilds and groups on platforms like Discord (which was not around back in 2004) instead of allowing them to emerge organically in the game. These things do not intrinsically make connections between players any better or worse than they were in WoW’s vanilla days, but they do change the nature of interactions in the world itself.

“Community for me back then was a lot of not knowing anything about what was going on and there not being a lot of help available other than what other players knew,” WestEschaton said. “That’s entirely different now… Video gaming is in a very different place now than it was in 2005, and if you play games at all, it’s very likely that you’ve changed with it. In essence, it’s pretty unlikely that you can take a large group of 2019 gamers, put them down in a 2005 game, and have them be happy. Museums are nice places to visit.”

Then there’s the question of what comes next. At some point, WoW Classic will have to advance beyond the halcyon vanilla days, or else even relatively casual players will eventually run out of things to do. If Blizzard opts to slowly dole out the same old expansions, there’s a good chance that lapsed players will just lapse again, given that many of them burnt out on Burning Crusade and the content that followed.

Kroguardious is concerned for WoW Classic’s future. “My fear is that they will just continue re-releasing each [expansion pack] and eventually we’ll no longer have our common place,” he said.

What he’d prefer, then, is for Blizzard to use WoW Classic as the jumping-off point for a divergent timeline. “I’d love to see a new timeline that follows the Classic style of gameplay,” he said. “No new level cap, or maybe only going up by one with a new expansion. Maybe we chase Kel’Thuzad’s phylactery to Northrend right away and defeat the Lich King before he’s built up such a powerful armory, and an entire new story takes place. That’d be a dream come true.”

For now, though, many players are just trying to savor their present moment of reliving the past.

“For some people, it might be temporary,” said Price. “Some people I know hit their 30s-40s, when the game really starts to hit its grind, and trickled off to play other things, and I totally understand that. I think others may get tired of it and stop playing altogether, but the community has made a lasting impression on most. The amount of expression seen in chat when an old friend or known community member hops in never gets old… I’m happy that it was able to help these people reconnect and hope that those connections continue for a long, long time.”

Source: Kotaku.com

World of Warcraft’s Greatest Tragedies Look So Much Cuter In A Pop-Up Book

Last year, in the lead-up to World of Warcraft’s Battle for Azeroth expansion, Horde leader Sylvanas Windrunner went a bit more evil than usual. She set the world tree ablaze, destroying the night elf capital of Teldrassil and murdering countless innocents in the process. It was one of the most horrific events in the online role-playing game’s history. It’s also a delightful papercraft creation in the upcoming <a rel="nofollow" data-amazonasin="194568366X" data-amazonsubtag="[t|link[p|1838287009[a|194568366X[au|5724686334600252479[b|kotaku[lt|text" onclick="window.ga('send', 'event', 'Commerce', 'kotaku – World of Warcraft's Greatest Tragedies Look So Much Cuter In A Pop-Up Book‘, ‘194568366X’);window.ga(‘unique.send’, ‘event’, ‘Commerce’, ‘kotaku – World of Warcraft's Greatest Tragedies Look So Much Cuter In A Pop-Up Book‘, ‘194568366X’);” data-amazontag=”kotakuamzn-20″ href=”https://www.amazon.com/World-Warcraft-Pop-Up-Book/dp/194568366X/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=world+of+warcraft+pop-up+book&qid=1568994581&sr=8-1&tag=kotakuamzn-20&ascsubtag=8f9cc87c5444531780a87d2cc290baf0d6d97fa9″>World of Warcraft Pop-Up Book. You can almost smell the roasting night elves.

History, be it real-world history or fantasy MMO history, is full of terror and death and tragedy, but learning about history doesn’t have to be. The pop-up book, one of papercraft’s finest creations, can add depth, whimsy, and fun to even the most heartrending events.

The next major event in the Horde and Alliance war following the burning of Teldrassil was the Battle for Lordaeron. In the heat of the confrontation, Sylvanas ordered the ruins of the ancient Alliance capital that served as the capstone to the undead Undercity to be bombarded with blight, rendering it completely inhospitable for even the living dead. The World of Warcraft Pop-Up book lets children of all ages experience the ruins from a safe distance, preserving history and health at the same time.

As a special bonus, the book includes a fold-out depicting what Stormwind looks like when you’re drunk.

Hopefully next they make the World of Warcraft Classic Pop-Up Book, which is the same thing only with scissors so you can cut out the new bits.

Source: Kotaku.com

World of Warcraft Players Are Migrating From Fan Servers To WoW Classic

“I couldn’t help it,” said Ash, one of the dedicated World of Warcraft fans who’d helped manage illicit fan servers for years, of his decision to play Blizzard’s official World of Warcraft Classic. “I just wanted to stop working on privately owned projects and focus on myself for once. And that’s what I did… For years, I focused purely on the best experience for the players. Now it’s my own turn.”

World of Warcraft, Blizzard’s mega-popular online role-playing game, has changed drastically in the 15 years since it first came out. Visual upgrades and story overhauls have transformed World of Warcraft into a very different game, and the version you can play in 2019 is wholly changed from its 2004 origins, much to the dismay of players like Ash, who craved an older version they had no official way to play. In the past, players who wanted to stick with old-school World of Warcraft have had no choice but to painstakingly recreate the game on private servers, risking that Blizzard might shut them down, as it did to Nostalrius, which had over 150,000 active accounts when it was shuttered in 2016. Today, there are over two dozen of these servers, some with thousands of active players grinding out levels in a more streamlined yet challenging version of the 15-year-old game.

Now, however, many of those players have another option: World of Warcraft Classic, an officially sanctioned vanilla version of the online game that came out last month. Kotaku spoke to nine people who design, code, and play on communities for private WoW servers, and they say that as expected, there has been an exodus from the illegitimate servers to the legitimate ones. One of the larger fan servers, Light’s Hope, recently shuttered, citing Blizzard’s promise to bring WoW fans home. One person who ran it declared the shutdown a “relief” in DMs with Kotaku.

Player counts on the fan-run servers Kronos and Elysium have dropped significantly, with Elysium’s population going down by 25 percent. “We were expecting close to 50 or 60,” said a player with the handle Rain, who works closely with Elysium. The members lists for legacy servers’ Discord groups are full of people marked as “Playing WoW Classic,” although many of these groups still contain thousands of users. WoW Classic appears to be satisfying legacy server’s players’ desire for a slower, less overwhelming version of the game, one with the feeling of community that many World of Warcraft players say is lacking in the 2019 version. The classic version of WoW has become a phenomenon, popularizing a culture that, until recently, existed mostly underground. In fact, so many people are playing WoW Classic that in its earliest days, there were hours-long queues to log in.

“I figured if Blizzard did it right, there would be no reason for us to continue on with the private server scene, which was just fine in my book,” said a person on Kronos’ game master team who asked to remain anonymous. “Log into any of the major private servers now and you will see a marked drop in player activity, as well as on their forums you will see people talking about leaving for Classic. Blizzard is the original creator of the game and it is only right that people will think they will do a better job with supporting, scripting, and managing the game and its servers.”

Said Skeith, who helped run Light’s Hope, “I absolutely do believe WoW Classic is pulling people away from private servers.” He said he appreciates how well Blizzard has handled some of the trickier aspects of running a large-scale MMO, like players exploiting the in-game economy. “We had quite a difficult time throughout our history dealing with people who could have destroyed our economy when they discovered a bug in our engine. I’d say for this fact alone that WoW Classic definitely scratches that itch.”

The stability of WoW Classic is one big draw, say private server players on WoW’s official forum. “Blizzard managed to get named quest mobs spawning in the right places; unlike [private] servers that had named quest mobs with static spawn locations,” said one. Lots of players are happier with how monsters “aggro,” or aggressively approach, players. Without the polish of a huge, money-backed studio with a full-time staff, legacy servers are full of bugs and exploits. WoW Classic has also drawn in a huge portion of the standard WoW community, making for a healthy, active player base.

Three people who help run private servers said they believe many of the players sticking with those servers either can’t afford to play World of Warcraft Classic or don’t have PCs good enough to run it. Playing World of Warcraft Classic requires an active WoW subscription, which costs $15 a month. Fan servers, meanwhile, are functionally free (although many players choose to donate).

Said one player on the server Dalaran, “I am not currently playing WoW Classic as I cannot afford a subscription. However, I shall be playing in 2 weeks after I get a paycheck in finally and to join many of my friends who have already gone ahead.” The Kronos Game Master says he’s ideologically opposed to paying $15 a month, the same price as retail WoW. “Many in the community (myself included) do not believe we should be charged the same fee for a 15 year old game as for a current game that has literally thousands of additional hours of content in it, and we see it as yet another way of them being able to pad their subscription numbers.”

A deep suspicion of publisher Activision colors lots of remaining private server players’ distaste for WoW Classic. Two told Kotaku they’re not playing the official version in protest of Activision, which in the words of the Kronos Game Master, is “more interested in quarterly profits than actually putting out good games and content for their player base.” DodgyKebaab, a YouTuber making content about private WoW servers, says that while he’s playing the new game, he’s fearful that WoW Classic will be subject to in-game monetization efforts that will ruin the experience for him. “A company that parades loot boxes around like they are the greatest thing to hit gaming is not a company I trust to keep a game like WoW Classic free of extra in-game real money transactions,” he said.

In a video titled “Why I’m not hyped for Warcraft Classic,” DodgyKebaab details the mechanical differences between Blizzard’s fresh take on Vanilla WoW and fans’ private servers. Like others in his community, he is deeply in touch with the intricacies of early WoW mechanics, and has strong opinions on them. In a direct message on Discord, he gave Kotaku the TL;DR version of his biggest complaint against WoW Classic: “They have used a technique called layering so each realm has multiple versions running at the same time,” he explained. “This does mean the player base is split up even though people are playing on the same realm. So you might meet someone one day [and] add them as a friend but the next day you find that you are on two separate layers so you won’t run into each other again.”

The continuing benefit of private servers is that they offer specific, custom features for players with personal preferences. Some have their own seasonal events, like for Valentine’s Day. Some feature hardcore raiding experiences, while others are entirely player-versus-player (PvP), ditching the computer-controlled monsters that populate most versions of World of Warcraft.

Player WhiteKidney, who helped run Light’s Hope, says he’s received over 50 direct messages on Discord from players requesting they bring back the server. “They feel we provided a much better experience than Blizzard has with classic (harder content, no layering for example),” he said.

“I personally don’t think that there will ever be anything ever quite like Light’s Hope or Nostalrius ever again with the advent of WoW Classic,” said the player Skeith, who until recently also helped run Light’s Hope, “but I personally believe we both played an important role in showing Blizzard that going back to your roots is not necessarily a bad thing.”

Source: Kotaku.com

Over A Million People Are Watching World of Warcraft Classic On Twitch

Image: Asmongold

After two years of anticipation, WoW Classic is finally live. Top streamers from every corner of Twitch are streaming it right now, resulting in an audience of over one million concurrent viewers—and some seriously congested starter areas.

As of this writing, the slavering horde of Horde (and Alliance) fans topped out at 1.1 million people. That’s a colossal number for a single game on Twitch. For reference, Fortnite has been recently pulling between 100,000 and 200,000 concurrent viewers at any given moment. It’s rare that even big esports events bring this kind of attention to a single game.

Even more impressively, WoW Classic pulled in the majority of these viewers while streamers were waiting to be able to log in. For example, by the time he was able to join a server, popular WoW streamer Asmongold was already at more than 200,000 viewers. Other popular streamers like Sodapoppin and Shroud, the latter of whom hasn’t traditionally been much of a WoW streamer, have attracted similarly gargantuan gaggles of gawking spectators. So too has top WoW guild Method, which is hosting an event where various personalities and high-level players race to be the world’s first players to complete, er, basically everything.

Even individual streamers are racing to level up, and the reason for that is simple: They want to physically separate themselves from the rest of the pack. Servers, especially ones that popular streamers have joined, are absolutely slammed right now, with tangled body piles of players rolling Katamari-like across the landscape and converging on quest-givers and low-level enemies alike.

It is comical to watch, but also frustrating, since enemies are having a hard time spawning quickly enough to keep up with demand, and the game is hitching and lagging in great, heaving bursts. Meanwhile, players who haven’t made it in yet are reporting hours-long server queue times. Granted, this is not entirely streamers’ fault. A lot of people have been waiting a long, long time to return to vanilla WoW’s boar-filled fields.

Still, despite technological improvements that are no doubt keeping the servers from plummeting off the internet altogether, it’s worth noting that the original World of Warcraft—and by extension, WoW Classicwas not designed with streamers and Discord and strictly regimented mega-guilds in mind. Those things, for the most part, didn’t come until later. It’ll be interesting, then, to see how streamers affect the 2004 revival’s delicate leveling ecosystem—not to mention if a relatively barebones MMO can hold people’s attention in the long run.

When WoW first launched, its quest system was a revolutionary streamlining of the MMO formula, but much of the game’s magic came from spontaneity in the absence of structured activity: hours-long world PVP struggles, awkward encounters in The Barrens, factions trying to storm each others’ home cities, blood plagues accidentally killing everybody, and so on. But times have changed, and you can’t just repeat something and have it feel spontaneous again. WoW Classic, much like vanilla WoW before it, will live or die based on what people make of it.

Source: Kotaku.com

Sorry, You Can’t Spell Out Messages With Skeletons In WoW Classic

In vanilla World of Warcraft, as in life, skeletons were built to last. If you died somewhere and your flesh decayed to bone, your blanched, skinless husk would stick around for so long that you could die again and produce another right next to it. If you’ve spent more than several seconds around those of the game-liking persuasion, you will not be shocked to learn that a lot of people did exactly that. WoW Classic, however, won’t allow it.

This might strike you as a betrayal of everything WoW Classic stands for. It is, after all, supposed to be a resurrection of the pre-expansion “vanilla” WoW experience. But Blizzard is modernizing that experience in subtle ways, and this is one of them. In a recent Reddit AMA, one fan noted that long-lasting skeletons used to serve a purpose, with big ol’ bone piles organically indicating dangerous areas. Senior test lead Josh “Aggrend” Greenfield agreed, but said that the feature was ultimately too abusable.

“While we understand that this was a flavorful part of Original WoW and the earlier expansions, individual players leaving multiple player corpses and skeletons throughout the game world can lead to behavior such as spelling out advertisements, hate speech, and other negative messages,” Greenfield wrote. “As such, this will not be a part of WoW Classic.”

It’s a shame, but at the same time, I do remember seeing a lot of advertisements for illicit gold farming services spelled out in skeletons back in the day, so it’s probably for the best. For now, then, I suppose we’ll have to settle for leaving our own real bones in piles that vaguely spell out messages for passersby. It is, I’ll admit, a little old-fashioned, but isn’t that why we’re excited about games like WoW Classic in the first place?

Source: Kotaku.com

I Can’t Deal With People Getting Ahead Of Me In MMOs

Kotaku Game DiaryDaily thoughts from a Kotaku staffer about a game we’re playing.  

Earlier today, my Kotaku coworker Heather Alexandra posted what I am sure was an amazing and insightful look at the end of Final Fantasy XIV’s Shadowbringers expansion. An ending that I’m still a level and a half and a whole bunch of quests away from experiencing. I am so damn jealous.

It’s not just Heather. It’s Heather and the countless other players who’ve managed to get ahead of me since Shadowbringers’ launch. It’s the people in my Free Company who hint at the cool things I haven’t seen yet (looking at you, Syg). It’s the people running by me in-game who are level 80 to my level 78. It’s folks on Twitter who respond to my screenshot tweets with posts like, “Oh neat, you’re getting near the end,” Brant.

I don’t hate these people. I could never hate them. We’re all playing and enjoying the same game. They’re just playing it faster than I am. And that should stop, somehow. I haven’t quite figured it out yet. Maybe progression servers where no one can play more than two hours a day? That seems reasonable.

I don’t get jealous when others progress faster than I do through single-player games. Hell, I never finished The Last Of Us, and I’ve never once felt like throwing heavy things at people who have. But when I am surrounded by living, breathing evidence of my personal lag, I get testy. It looks like my little World of Warcraft gnome is running through Mechagon Island having the time of her life, but behind the keyboard, I am loudly cursing at people who’ve gotten new mounts and equipment before I have.

All that these poor people are guilty of is having more free time than I do. Maybe I should be happy that I have such a full life that I don’t have as much time to dedicate to a massively multiplayer online game. That seems healthier than combining curse words with body parts that don’t go together, calling players that can’t hear me things like “shit elbow” and “fuck neck”.

Ultimately, my anger and frustration is with myself, and it eventually subsides. In a week, I’ll have finished Final Fantasy XIV Shadowbringers’ story, and I’ll stop wishing serious internet and/or power outages on my friends and co-workers. Love you, Heather.

Source: Kotaku.com

Juggling World Of Warcraft And Final Fantasy XIV Isn’t Easy

Kotaku Game DiaryDaily thoughts from a Kotaku staffer about a game we’re playing.  

One minute I’m a gnome warlock, delving deep into the naga-infested ocean of World of Warcraft’s Azeroth. The next I’m a red mage with cat ears and a tail, trying to remember my spell rotation in Final Fantasy XIV before the Shadowbringers expansion comes out. There’s brand-new content in both of my favorite massively multiplayer online role-playing games, and I’m having trouble keeping up.

I’ve been playing MMORPG games since the days of Ultima Online, but normally one at a time. I can juggle non-MMO games all day long. I’m currently playing a retro platforming shooter on the Switch (Gunlord-X), a monster truck racer on the Xbox One (Monster Jam Steel Titans), and a tactical fighting game (Samurai Shodown) on the PlayStation 4. There’s no danger of me mixing up those three.

MMORPGs are a different story. I’ve been playing World of Warcraft for nearly 15 years and Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn since its relaunch in 2013. Both games take place in unique fantasy settings. Both feature rich storylines I’ve become heavily invested in over the years. In both games I am part of an expansive community. I’ve got friends on servers and friends in guilds. I wish I could play World of Warcraft and Final Fantasy XIV more.

Except for right now. Right now, World of Warcraft just released the Rise of Azshara expansion, adding two massive new zones full of quests, gear, and adventure. Meanwhile, in Final Fantasy XIV, the Shadowbringers expansion launches in early access on Friday, and I’ve got a couple of dungeons to complete before I’ve caught up with the game’s story, which I have to complete before I can enjoy the expansion’s new high-level content.

I am hopping back and forth between two very different characters on two structurally similar but mechanically unique games, and I am getting dizzy. Here are some of the fun things I’ve screwed up in the process of playing both.

  • After a few months away, I’ve finally remembered the button sequence I use to efficiently perform my Final Fantasy XIV red mage’s spell rotation…in World of Warcraft, where it is far from how I play my warlock. I have died several times.
Red mage or dead warlock? Your choice!
  • I keep forgetting to summon my demon in Final Fantasy XIV. I have no demon in Final Fantasy XIV.
  • Did you know that red mages in Final Fantasy XIV often handle rezzing duties in multiplayer trials against powerful boss creatures? I forgot, and I got yelled at last night, and it was completely my fault.
  • I keep trying to message linkshell members from Final Fantasy XIV in World of Warcraft and WoW guildies in FFXIV.

It’s not always like this. During less busy times, when the lulls between new content grow long, I can slip between the two with ease. But now, standing at the crossroads between brand new Azeroth stuff and becoming Final Fantasy XIV’s Warrior of Darkness, I kind of just want to curl up and wait until the traffic is clear. I won’t, as it is my duty to collect and report on that sweet MMORPG booty. Just forgive me if I mix up my verstone and corruption spells.

Source: Kotaku.com

World Of Warcraft’s Rise Of Azshara Update Is Live And There’s So Much To Do

It’s a big day for World of Warcraft as the long-running MMORPG upgrades to version 8.2 with the massive Rise of Azshara update. Players can now explore two new zones, earn gnome and tauren heritage armor, learn to fly in the Battle for Azeroth zones and gain the ability to hide all of their armor but their pants. Truly, it is the dawn of a new Azerothian age.

Internally, and by that I mean inside my head, I’ve been referring to Rise of Azshara as the gnome update. One of the two new zones introduced, the mechanical city of Mechagon, is a gnomish paradise, and I hope my smaller World of Warcraft characters can spend most of their lives living there. The Mechagon Island zone is sort of an extension of my favorite spot in the expansion, and I can’t wait to explore its junk-covered hills, meeting and making all sorts of mechanical toys, minions and equipment using the new junkyard tinkering feature.

Mechagon Island leads to Operation: Mechagon, a new eight-boss mega-dungeon that’s only available in the advanced, Mythic difficulty.

Meanwhile, in non-gnomish content, Horde and Alliance players will be plunged into the Nazjatar zone, home of Queen Azshara and her naga armies. I don’t know why she gets top billing, but her zone, which is a vast kingdom beneath the surface of Azeroth’s ocean, looks mighty impressive so far.

In Nazjatar, players can collect something called Prismatic Manapears, which can be exchanged for special upgradeable Benthic gear. This unique armor, intended for use in the Nazjatar zone and the upcoming Azshara’s Eternal Palace raid, will grant the owner special benefits, such as increased damage, increased mount speed, enemy debuffs and such.

This is one of those World of Warcraft expansions where I log in and have no idea what to go after first. Do I work towards earning exalted with Gnomeregan so I can get the new gnome heritage armor?

Do I level an alt so I can get the tauren heritage armor, which replaces cloaks with a huge, wooden totem?

There are also new quests to complete. The war campaign continues, advancing the Horde versus Alliance battle at the center of the Battle for Azeroth expansion. There are new island expeditions and a vast new PVP battleground to get wrecked in. Hell, I haven’t even completed the first half of the flying in Battle for Azeroth achievement, and now the second half is live in the game. Should I complete that and get the mechanical parrot mount? I just don’t know.

Oh wait, let me just look through these update notes one more time. Of course, it was staring me in the face this whole time. One moment.

Did I mention players can now turn all of their armor invisible except for their pants? It’s pants party time, people. PANTS PARTY.

Check out Blizzard’s hand Rise of Azshara survival guide video for a list of things to do if pants parties aren’t your thing.

Source: Kotaku.com

WoW Classic Fans Brace For The Arrival Of Something That Didn’t Exist In 2004: Twitch Streamers

Image: WoW Classic

World Of Warcraft Classic is kinda wild when you think about it. It’s a time capsule from 2004 that you can live inside, a swirling portal to a place many people thought they’d never get to visit again. There’s no denying, however, that times have changed since “Vanilla” WoW’s rosily-remembered heyday. One recent development that’s been causing some friction: streamers.

Currently, WoW Classic is still in closed beta, meaning access is limited. A handful of popular streamers like Sodapoppin, Asmongold, Dafran, and Esfand are among those who can play, and they’re already the most visible presences in the beta. Some prospective players have gone so far as to swear off so-called “streamer servers” entirely. This largely stems from concerns that once WoW Classic is properly live, streamers’ fans will constantly mob them, obliterate everyone else in PVP through sheer numbers, overwhelm in-game economies, and generally make toxic nuisances of themselves.

“Almost the entire population revolves around them,” said one player on the WoW Classic subreddit, voicing concerns that are, so far, largely hypothetical given the current scope of the beta. “When they are on, 2k more people are on, when they aren’t it’s dead.”

While World of Warcraft has always put most things of consequence—dungeons, raids, PVP arenas, etc—in their own sequestered-off “instances” so as to create structure and keep jerks from raining on people’s parades, modern WoW is much more heavily instanced than Vanilla WoW was. Many fans regard WoW Classic as a chance to return to the days when non-instanced “world” PVP was all the rage, and massive spontaneous clashes between Horde and Alliance were the norm. Not only that, there will be world bosses and, eventually, limited-time world events for players to contend with in Classic.

As a result, some are worried that streamers will throw endless armies of fans at PVP, bosses, progression, economies, and more, monopolizing WoW Classic in a way that’s simply not possible in WoW as it is now. The Wild West feeling of early WoW, they fear, will be trampled by streamers immediately grabbing the spotlight and refusing to let go.

At this point, it’s hard to say if things will unfold this way once WoW Classic is available to everyone. However, there have been some instances of streamers and their audiences causing a ruckus in the beta, as when Dafran disrupted an otherwise orderly tournament by attacking the opposing faction, kicking off a massive, ugly brawl.

In another instance, Asmongold and a horde of Alliance followers kited a black dragon world boss all the way to the Alliance capital city of Stormwind. Havoc, as you might expect, ensued. True, Asmongold and his friends pulled off a heck of a feat, but it also drove home the idea that streamers can wield their influence in ways that bring entire servers to their knees.

Streamers, meanwhile, are dealing with issues of their own. As battle royale games like PUBG and Fortnite have shown us, where streamers go, stream snipers follow, to try and kill them or just infuriate them with troll-y antics. During a stream yesterday, Sodapoppin proposed a controversial plan to discourage stream-sniping shenanigans in WoW Classic: a Horde and Alliance “blacklist.” He prefaced his idea by saying that he wishes people would just treat him like an anonymous player, but that’s not happening. And while he thinks it’s fine to kill streamers, he said that if somebody is obviously stream sniping—for example, moving exactly where he’s moving while stealthed—then they’ll get added to his list.

“I’ll take that person, and I’ll say, ‘OK, blacklist this person,’” he said. “My friends on the Alliance or other streamers don’t play with this person. They are never allowed in anything that the actual good guilds on the Alliance are doing. They are blacklisted. And it’s vice-versa as well. So you won’t get any good raids. You’ll never get any good gear. And eventually, if you want to keep stream sniping, you’ll be doing it while I have double your gear.”

Players have not taken kindly to this suggestion. One highly upvoted thread on the WoW Classic subreddit offered a particularly dramatic response to Sodapoppin and like-minded streamers.

“Down with Soda, and down with anyone else who believes they should be able to dictate who is able to enjoy the game,” wrote the player who started the thread. “You get the perks of being a streamer, and one of the few things we get out of your perks is the ability to hunt you. As a result I suggest we create a super guild, ‘The Blacklist’ with the explicit purpose of pushing content as efficiently as possible, with the goal of hunting those who wish to abuse their streamer privilege to dictate what others may do. Any and all shall be welcome, and those who we blacklist shall be hunted relentlessly.”

Others, however, view this as an opportunity. They like their Vanilla WoW experience spicy, and in streamers, they see high potential for PVP, chaos, and drama.

“Sooo many extra events, sooo much more PVP and Drama,” wrote one player on the official WoW Classic forums who pledged to “terrorize the Streamers and their goons.”

The player drew a distinction between WoW Classic and the current expansion Battle For Azeroth, in which PVP-centric stats and abilities function completely differently than they did in WoW’s early days. “”The streamers will not be invincible,” they wrote. “A group of 20-30 highly skilled and coordinated PVPers that are decked out in PVP/PVE gear can easily wipe out a streamer and their 80+back peddling headless chicken goons.”

Even some players who don’t write like super villains think the inevitable streamer influx doesn’t have to be a bad thing. One, who said they personally will “cut their losses and re-roll” if they ever end up on a server with a popular streamer, is still choosing to view things through an optimistic lens.

“My best memories of WoW were in 2006 when there was a huge influx of new players,” they wrote in a post on the WoW Classic forums. “It was fun watching new players experience everything for the first time. It reminded me of my first time leveling to 60. A few months later, we were all noobs in a new raid. If these streamers are hyping this game and bringing in new players, maybe we can see this as a positive and something that will enhance our experience.”

Source: Kotaku.com

World Of Warcraft Classic Beta Players Are Reporting Bugs That Are Actually Just Features From The Past

Screenshot: Blizzard (WoW)

World Of Warcraft is an old game that has changed a lot since it was first launched back in 2004. Many players might have forgotten just how the game worked back then and as a result, players with access to the new classic version of the game are reporting old features as bugs.

World of Warcraft Classic is currently in beta, which means some players are getting a chance to experience a much older version of the MMO ahead of its release. WoW Classic is based on how WoW played in August 2006, back around update 1.12. Back then, things were different. Tauren hitboxes were much larger, sitting could cause certain combat effects to not trigger and completed quests were marked with dots and not question marks. Strange days.

These differences and classic features are causing some confusion among beta testers, who are submitting bug reports based on features that are working as intended. For example, creature spawn rates are much lower and slower in this version of the game. That’s not a bug, that’s just old World of Warcraft.

In response to these false bug reports, Blizzard has released a “not-a-bug list.” This list contains about dozen different things that aren’t broken or wrong, but working exactly how Blizzard wants them too. There is an actual bug list of real problems, but that is very different than the list below.

It seems Blizzard feels some players have incorrect memories of how WoW used to work and made this list to help gently remind players that World of Warcraft was a much different game back in the day.

One player said in a comment posted in response to the list, “Yeah people don’t realize the sheer enormity of game system evolution WoW has gone through since release. I’m not the biggest fan of BoA by any stretch, but I’ve played since closed beta vanilla, and I doubt I’ll be going back to classic. Leveling was painful. Experiencing these old systems once was enough.”

Source: Kotaku.com